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SQL: Programming Guide: Javascript and Coding - Kindle Edition now Free @ Amazon
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SQL: Programming Guide: Javascript and Coding - Kindle Edition now Free @ Amazon

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Posted 13th Aug
Good crash course style book, if you wanted to pick up some SQL skills.

The book helps you understand:
  • Table Basics
  • The SELECT Statement
  • Using Clauses
  • Combining Conditions and Boolean Operators
  • The Importance of Table Joins

It claims to make you an expert in a day, but oh well, that bit, I would take with a pinch of salt

Hope it helps someone.
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snappyfish13/08/2019 14:59

I love dabbling with web stuff, i fiddle with sites for fun for family …I love dabbling with web stuff, i fiddle with sites for fun for family members, still a good trade to get into?


Yes it's massively growing. I'm 48 and I don't care about my age, employers might do, but I'll cross that bridge if I come to it. Nothing is stopping me from learning as much as I can, so screw ageists, they need people like me, hard working, never giving up. I used to be an insane addict, so I just about beat that, nothing can touch me after that to be honest. I've done the hard bits of life, programming is easy in comparison.

The Odin Project
FreeCodeCamp
Open App Academy

Personally I'd go with The Odin Project and Open App Academy and choose one of those two. I've been doing Open App Academy which I really liked with the video tutorials but The Odin Project, gets you dev setup straight away. So it gets you setup on these:

Code Editor : Visual Studio Code
Version History: GIT / Github
Linux/Unix Command Line

As soon as possible you should be pushing your code to Github daily. Why? Because it essentially tracks everything you're doing and provides an employer with your status, what you've been doing. So the employer can see what you were doing in the last 12 months for example. No commits to Github in the last 12 months? Been playing on the PS4 too much thinks the employer, next candidate please.

I also linked tomato.es to Github and it tracks everything I do daily using the Pomodoro method, if you're an addicted procastinating loathsome feckwit like myself, I found this to be revolutionary in making me actually do work everyday. I had to kick my r's everyday to do something, even though I know it's vital for my future, procrastination is easy, brain likes easy, doesn't like hard, if you do hard and you can't do hard and struggle, brain thinks, oh s^&t! not as clever as I thought I was are we? Brain crashes, doesn't like hard. Hard is an illusionary measure of your worth, hard is absolutely worth doing, hard is the way. Anyway I now have a system of learning and I enjoy learning stuff everyday.

One last thing. Forget languages, just learn how to program, not learn how to code, learn to program, most people say learn Javascript as soon as you can, but I found Javascript to be such a hateful language in comparison to Ruby. I really enjoy Ruby and it got me programming quicker. Javascript is the standard of the web and it's getting better and better, but damn is it horrible to use in comparison to Ruby. Do NOT worry that you're learning Ruby first. It does NOT matter. Learn to program that is the plan. Get very good at Algorithms and Data Structures, Algorithms are essentially recipes that do stuff, they often include mathematics but ultimately they're logical constructs, and Data Structures are just data constructs of programming, so ways to organise, manage and store data.

In terms of HTML, HTML is very easy to understand. CSS is also easy to understand, but CSS must have the most massive library of commands ever. You could literally just become an expert in CSS and get a job, however the three main systems of front end web dev are HTML, CSS and Javascript. The courses above take longer because they give you back end skills as well, in fact they're known as full stack as you learn the main systems of full stack development.

Don't pay to learn Web Dev, you can do it all for free. What I would pay for is a mentor and that's what you can do with Open App Academy, it's free, but a mentor is $29 a month, which is a bargain. The Odin Project has a Discord so you can buddy up with someone there. It's vital you pair program to keep motivated and try and find local programming/web dev clubs and go once a week, network with people. They might be the ones giving you a job in the future, start now. Programming is constantly about solving problems, it's difficult if you haven't done that before. Everything is a puzzle to be solved, you will want to give up and you will get frustrated. I spent most of last night fixing my Ruby on Rails setup because the bundler versions were wrong, I was trying all the commands I could think of and find on Stack Exchange, but I didn't think oh damn this is wasting time, I should be learning. I was learning because I fixed something that was broken and I learnt how to fix it.

Programming is not easy, in fact it's very difficult, it's not for everyone, but just about everyone can do it, if they put in the effort. What Maths do you need to learn? I have not much idea, I didn't even know what Modulo was and I've learnt that, so whatever Maths they throw at me I'll learn as and when I need it.

Link to mentored learning > exercism.io/
Edited by: "fishmaster" 14th Aug
33 Comments
SELECT * hot_freebies FROM HUKD;
Thanks for that - will give it a go.
delete from users where username<>'jaydeeuk1'
GO
delete from deals where mechantname='Gearbest'
I love dabbling with web stuff, i fiddle with sites for fun for family members, still a good trade to get into?
Edited by: "snappyfish" 13th Aug
Thanks. Some light reading before bedtime.
"The only mention of Javascript is in the title." << /chuckled
snappyfish13/08/2019 14:59

I love dabbling with web stuff, i fiddle with sites for fun for family …I love dabbling with web stuff, i fiddle with sites for fun for family members, still a good trade to get into?


If you're serious about it, yes. Huge money in software development because good developers are hard to find. I'm a developer / DBA by trade but have now set myself up as an LTD co for consultancy and are working with a client to try and recruit a couple of developers. In East Midlands junior Devs with a couple of years experience should expect £25-£30k, I imagine far more in London. Senior Devs at the company are on £45-£55k, another contractor on £350 a day, myself £400+vat. London rates can be £1000+, and the very best 'problem solver' type consultants can be several k a day.
snappyfish13/08/2019 14:59

I love dabbling with web stuff, i fiddle with sites for fun for family …I love dabbling with web stuff, i fiddle with sites for fun for family members, still a good trade to get into?


Oh yes absolutely - as @jaydeeuk1 says in his comment above, if you are good, you can make a very good salary. I work for a big MNC in an engineering capacity and recruit developers for the software we write and I can tell you the pay is pretty good
Not a great book unless you want to inadvertently share your new databases with the whole world. One of the PHP examples has an obvious SQL injection vulnerability in it.
Not a great book unless you want to inadvertently share your new databases with the whole world. One of the PHP examples has an obvious SQL injection vulnerability in it.
jaydeeuk113/08/2019 18:32

If you're serious about it, yes. Huge money in software development …If you're serious about it, yes. Huge money in software development because good developers are hard to find. I'm a developer / DBA by trade but have now set myself up as an LTD co for consultancy and are working with a client to try and recruit a couple of developers. In East Midlands junior Devs with a couple of years experience should expect £25-£30k, I imagine far more in London. Senior Devs at the company are on £45-£55k, another contractor on £350 a day, myself £400+vat. London rates can be £1000+, and the very best 'problem solver' type consultants can be several k a day.


Typically how long would you give someone to learn? Or expect to learn?
jaydeeuk113/08/2019 18:32

If you're serious about it, yes. Huge money in software development …If you're serious about it, yes. Huge money in software development because good developers are hard to find. I'm a developer / DBA by trade but have now set myself up as an LTD co for consultancy and are working with a client to try and recruit a couple of developers. In East Midlands junior Devs with a couple of years experience should expect £25-£30k, I imagine far more in London. Senior Devs at the company are on £45-£55k, another contractor on £350 a day, myself £400+vat. London rates can be £1000+, and the very best 'problem solver' type consultants can be several k a day.


Yeah that's the feeling I am getting, so embarked on building my site to show as a portfolio and still developing it. I find the whole web developer stuff Interesting. Any other tips u can give to someone like me to get a job as a junior developer? I have experience using Matlab, Mathematica, Maple and some Python from doing a mathematics degree.
Edited by: "RaiKush" 13th Aug
RaiKush13/08/2019 19:18

Yeah that's the feeling I am getting, so embarked on building my site to …Yeah that's the feeling I am getting, so embarked on building my site to show as a portfolio and still developing it. I find the whole web developer stuff Interesting. Any other tips u can give to someone like me to get a job as a junior developer? I have experience using Matlab, Mathematica, Maple and some Python from doing a mathematics degree.


That's the best way with no previous experience or recent degree, having examples of work using a variety of tech, bootstrap, react, jQuery, c# etc and how it was built such as MVC, .net core, perhaps knowledge and working of agile development or similar. SQL is always handy, as is knowing how to navigate around the azure dashboard, deploy apps. Used to be the big money was in Microsoft stack, but with AWS being a big player then it opens up other ways of getting in to it. Impossible to learn everything, I've never touched PHP or python, node, and only ever used SQL server, iis , xenserver (although now using more of azure db and virtual machines). I think whichever route you go down will open up plenty of options. Id rather (and have) taken someone on with a good portfolio of work self taught as opposed to a graduate
jaydeeuk113/08/2019 19:41

That's the best way with no previous experience or recent degree, having …That's the best way with no previous experience or recent degree, having examples of work using a variety of tech, bootstrap, react, jQuery, c# etc and how it was built such as MVC, .net core, perhaps knowledge and working of agile development or similar. SQL is always handy, as is knowing how to navigate around the azure dashboard, deploy apps. Used to be the big money was in Microsoft stack, but with AWS being a big player then it opens up other ways of getting in to it. Impossible to learn everything, I've never touched PHP or python, node, and only ever used SQL server, iis , xenserver (although now using more of azure db and virtual machines). I think whichever route you go down will open up plenty of options. Id rather (and have) taken someone on with a good portfolio of work self taught as opposed to a graduate


Yeah, I found out that initiating things is the way forward. So I have made the site live, and continue editing every 4 days. I have learnt a lot and like using Visual studio code. The only gripe i have is, most jobs ask for experience, but how do you gain more experience if not given the chance...., but anyway for me, I don't let that deter me. I will keep on learning and eventually I will get there. You're also right in saying you can't know everything, I found out that there is a lot of things out there i.e. Bootstrap, SQL, Java, Ruby, Azure, C++ etc. But I decided HTML, CSS and Javascript are ideal as we will keep using websites for the foreseeable future. I will also keep doing all the computational mathematics so as to not forget it.
Edited by: "RaiKush" 13th Aug
RaiKush13/08/2019 19:48

Yeah, I found out that initiating things is the way forward. So I have …Yeah, I found out that initiating things is the way forward. So I have made the site live, and continue editing every 4 days. I have learnt a lot and like using Visual studio code. The only gripe i have is, most jobs ask for experience, but how do you gain more experience if not given the chance...., but anyway for me, I don't let that deter me. I will keep on learning and eventually I will get there. You're also right in saying you can't know everything, I found out that there is a lot of things out there i.e. Bootstrap, SQL, Java, Ruby, Azure, C++ etc. But I decided HTML, CSS and Javascript are ideal as we will keep using websites for the foreseeable future. I will also keep doing all the computational mathematics so as to not forget it.


Depends how you sell yourself. If you're doing work to build a portfolio that is experience, put it as self employment or freelancing on your CV. Just because a job advertises for experience it's still difficult getting the right candidate so sometimes the requirements may be relaxed. We can advertise for several weeks or months and not get anything appropriate in (usually applicants from middle East!). A company in Leeds or Nottingham can probably be a bit more picky than somewhere out in the sticks.

Include all your skills on your CV, even if they may not be 100% relevant to the position. We took on a junior web developer who didn't have much experience, basic HTML and CSS because they're big in to VR and had a cracking portfolio of 360 and VR videos in unity and the like and knew her way round adobe premiere. It was an area we were looking in to so she got the job purely on that
Edited by: "jaydeeuk1" 13th Aug
jaydeeuk113/08/2019 20:00

Depends how you sell yourself. If you're doing work to build a portfolio …Depends how you sell yourself. If you're doing work to build a portfolio that is experience, put it as self employment or freelancing on your CV. Just because a job advertises for experience it's still difficult getting the right candidate so sometimes the requirements may be relaxed. We can advertise for several weeks or months and not get anything appropriate in (usually applicants from middle East!). A company in Leeds or Nottingham can probably be a bit more picky than somewhere out in the sticks.Include all your skills on your CV, even if they may not be 100% relevant to the position. We took on a junior web developer who didn't have much experience, basic HTML and CSS because they're big in to VR and had a cracking portfolio of 360 and VR videos in unity and the like and knew her way round adobe premiere. It was an area we were looking in to so she got the job purely on that


Fair enough & thank u, I had my CV reviewed by the university, I will tweak to add freelancing. I will keep going till I get there, in the meantime I will keep teaching mathematics privately + how to use computer algebra systems like wolfram mathematica...
snappyfish13/08/2019 14:59

I love dabbling with web stuff, i fiddle with sites for fun for family …I love dabbling with web stuff, i fiddle with sites for fun for family members, still a good trade to get into?


Yes it's massively growing. I'm 48 and I don't care about my age, employers might do, but I'll cross that bridge if I come to it. Nothing is stopping me from learning as much as I can, so screw ageists, they need people like me, hard working, never giving up. I used to be an insane addict, so I just about beat that, nothing can touch me after that to be honest. I've done the hard bits of life, programming is easy in comparison.

The Odin Project
FreeCodeCamp
Open App Academy

Personally I'd go with The Odin Project and Open App Academy and choose one of those two. I've been doing Open App Academy which I really liked with the video tutorials but The Odin Project, gets you dev setup straight away. So it gets you setup on these:

Code Editor : Visual Studio Code
Version History: GIT / Github
Linux/Unix Command Line

As soon as possible you should be pushing your code to Github daily. Why? Because it essentially tracks everything you're doing and provides an employer with your status, what you've been doing. So the employer can see what you were doing in the last 12 months for example. No commits to Github in the last 12 months? Been playing on the PS4 too much thinks the employer, next candidate please.

I also linked tomato.es to Github and it tracks everything I do daily using the Pomodoro method, if you're an addicted procastinating loathsome feckwit like myself, I found this to be revolutionary in making me actually do work everyday. I had to kick my r's everyday to do something, even though I know it's vital for my future, procrastination is easy, brain likes easy, doesn't like hard, if you do hard and you can't do hard and struggle, brain thinks, oh s^&t! not as clever as I thought I was are we? Brain crashes, doesn't like hard. Hard is an illusionary measure of your worth, hard is absolutely worth doing, hard is the way. Anyway I now have a system of learning and I enjoy learning stuff everyday.

One last thing. Forget languages, just learn how to program, not learn how to code, learn to program, most people say learn Javascript as soon as you can, but I found Javascript to be such a hateful language in comparison to Ruby. I really enjoy Ruby and it got me programming quicker. Javascript is the standard of the web and it's getting better and better, but damn is it horrible to use in comparison to Ruby. Do NOT worry that you're learning Ruby first. It does NOT matter. Learn to program that is the plan. Get very good at Algorithms and Data Structures, Algorithms are essentially recipes that do stuff, they often include mathematics but ultimately they're logical constructs, and Data Structures are just data constructs of programming, so ways to organise, manage and store data.

In terms of HTML, HTML is very easy to understand. CSS is also easy to understand, but CSS must have the most massive library of commands ever. You could literally just become an expert in CSS and get a job, however the three main systems of front end web dev are HTML, CSS and Javascript. The courses above take longer because they give you back end skills as well, in fact they're known as full stack as you learn the main systems of full stack development.

Don't pay to learn Web Dev, you can do it all for free. What I would pay for is a mentor and that's what you can do with Open App Academy, it's free, but a mentor is $29 a month, which is a bargain. The Odin Project has a Discord so you can buddy up with someone there. It's vital you pair program to keep motivated and try and find local programming/web dev clubs and go once a week, network with people. They might be the ones giving you a job in the future, start now. Programming is constantly about solving problems, it's difficult if you haven't done that before. Everything is a puzzle to be solved, you will want to give up and you will get frustrated. I spent most of last night fixing my Ruby on Rails setup because the bundler versions were wrong, I was trying all the commands I could think of and find on Stack Exchange, but I didn't think oh damn this is wasting time, I should be learning. I was learning because I fixed something that was broken and I learnt how to fix it.

Programming is not easy, in fact it's very difficult, it's not for everyone, but just about everyone can do it, if they put in the effort. What Maths do you need to learn? I have not much idea, I didn't even know what Modulo was and I've learnt that, so whatever Maths they throw at me I'll learn as and when I need it.

Link to mentored learning > exercism.io/
Edited by: "fishmaster" 14th Aug
fishmaster13/08/2019 20:51

Yes it's massively growing. I'm 48 and I don't care about my age, …Yes it's massively growing. I'm 48 and I don't care about my age, employers might do, but I'll cross that bridge if I come to it. Nothing is stopping me from learning as much as I can, so screw ageists, they need people like me, hard working, never giving up. I used to be an insane addict, so I just about beat that, nothing can touch me after that to be honest. I've done the hard bits of life, programming is easy in comparison. The Odin ProjectFreeCodeCampOpen App AcademyPersonally I'd go with The Odin Project and Open App Academy and choose one of those two. I've been doing Open App Academy which I really liked with the video tutorials but The Odin Project, gets you dev setup straight away. So it gets you setup on these:Code Editor : Visual Studio CodeVersion History: GIT / GithubLinux/Unix Command LineAs soon as possible you should be pushing your code to Github daily. Why? Because it essentially tracks everything you're doing and provides an employer with your status, what you've been doing. So the employer can see what you were doing in the last 12 months for example. No commits to Github in the last 12 months? Been playing on the PS4 too much thinks the employer, next candidate please. I also linked tomato.es to Github and it tracks everything I do daily using the Pomodoro method, if you're an addicted procastinating loathsome feckwit like myself, I found this to be revolutionary in making me actually do work everyday. I had to kick my r's everyday to do something, even though I know it's vital for my future, procrastination is easy, brain likes easy, doesn't like hard, if you do hard and you can't do hard and struggle, brain thinks, oh s^&t! not as clever as I thought I was are we? Brain crashes, doesn't like hard. Hard is an illusionary measure of your worth, hard is absolutely worth doing, hard is the way. Anyway I now have a system of learning and I enjoy learning stuff everyday.One last thing. Forget languages, just learn how to program, not learn how to code, learn to program, most people say learn Javascript as soon as you can, but I found Javascript to be such a hateful language in comparison to Ruby. I really enjoy Ruby and it got me programming quicker. Javascript is the standard of the web and it's getting better and better, but damn is it horrible to use in comparison to Ruby. Do NOT worry that you're learning Ruby first. It does NOT matter. Learn to program that is the plan. Get very good at Algorithms and Data Structures, Algorithms are essentially recipes that do stuff, they often include mathematics but ultimately they're logical constructs, and Data Structures are just data constructs of programming, so ways to organise, manage and store data. In terms of HTML, HTML is very easy to understand. CSS is also easy to understand, but CSS must have the most massive library of commands ever. You could literally just become an expert in CSS and get a job, however the three main systems of front end web dev are HTML, CSS and Javascript. The courses above take longer because they give you back end skills as well, in fact they're known as full stack as you learn the main systems of full stack development. Don't pay to learn Web Dev, you can do it all for free. What I would pay for is a mentor and that's what you can do with Open App Academy, it's free, but a mentor is $29 a month, which is a bargain. The Odin Project has a Discord so you can buddy up with someone there. It's vital you pair program to keep motivated and try and find local programming/web dev clubs and go once a week, network with people. They might be the ones giving you a job in the future, start now. Programming is constantly about solving problems, it's difficult if you haven't done that before. Everything is a puzzle to be solved, you will want to give up and you will get frustrated. I spent most of last night fixing my Ruby on Rails setup because the bundler versions were wrong, I was trying all the commands I could think of and find on Stack Exchange, but I didn't think oh damn this is wasting time, I should be learning. I was learning because I fixed something that was broken and I learnt how to fix it.Programming is not easy, in fact it's very difficult, it's not for everyone, but just about everyone can do it, if they put in the effort. What Maths do you need to learn? I have not much idea, I didn't even know what Modulo was and I've learnt that, so whatever Maths they throw at me I'll learn as and when I need it.


Great Post, thanks I'm just 43.. I'm the type who sits for hours tweaking my website and my family's websites. Its not a paid job for me but I'd like to earn money from it one day.. Really thinking about how to get more involved this year.
snappyfish13/08/2019 23:26

Great Post, thanks I'm just 43.. I'm the type who sits for hours tweaking …Great Post, thanks I'm just 43.. I'm the type who sits for hours tweaking my website and my family's websites. Its not a paid job for me but I'd like to earn money from it one day.. Really thinking about how to get more involved this year.


There is a lot to learn, and whilst you can do it for free, I suggest a formal way of doing it via an organised course, the main three I suggested above and I've tried all three and for me The Odin Project has the right balance. FreeCodeCamp has an awesome Javascript section so that's also worth doing. You might like videos so do Open App Academy, however I would do the Web 101 of The Odin Project first, so you know how to setup everything including GIT / GitHub as they're vitally important.
I'll add this to my original post and here so it's visible >

exercism.io/

Quite a cool site, where you choose a language and then do exercises which are reviewed by mentors, and you gain feedback to improve your skills in your chosen language/s
fishmaster13/08/2019 23:30

There is a lot to learn, and whilst you can do it for free, I suggest a …There is a lot to learn, and whilst you can do it for free, I suggest a formal way of doing it via an organised course, the main three I suggested above and I've tried all three and for me The Odin Project has the right balance. FreeCodeCamp has an awesome Javascript section so that's also worth doing. You might like videos so do Open App Academy, however I would do the Web 101 of The Odin Project first, so you know how to setup everything including GIT / GitHub as they're vitally important.


Thanks, a career change. Or even trying to push myself into something else at 43 after spending my 23 years with one employer seems daunting.

I currently work for myself. But I'd like to do something like this. But how on earth do I even get employed.

Does this work happen remotely? Or you office based?
snappyfish15/08/2019 07:24

Thanks, a career change. Or even trying to push myself into something else …Thanks, a career change. Or even trying to push myself into something else at 43 after spending my 23 years with one employer seems daunting.I currently work for myself. But I'd like to do something like this. But how on earth do I even get employed. Does this work happen remotely? Or you office based?


If you've not done it before then it's office based. Then eventually you can work remotely and even work for yourself if you wish with all the pros and cons that entails.
This Post proved wayyyyyyyy more informative than I'd initially thought it would have presented itself as. :-)

Good insight there, all you guy's.
Edited by: "amour3k" 17 h, 56 m ago
amour3k16/08/2019 03:46

This Post proved wayyyyyyyy more informative than I'd initially thought it …This Post proved wayyyyyyyy more informative than I'd initially thought it would have presented itself as. :-)Good onsite for all guy's.


Absolutely, some super helpful and detailed comments from folks who know their stuff. I am glad I played a small part in facilitating those comments by posting the deal
matwalaboy16/08/2019 10:12

Absolutely, some super helpful and detailed comments from folks who know …Absolutely, some super helpful and detailed comments from folks who know their stuff. I am glad I played a small part in facilitating those comments by posting the deal


Yep, and amen to all of that too. :-)
Edited by: "amour3k" 16th Aug
Coming up as 1.99 for me...
fishmaster15/08/2019 07:30

If you've not done it before then it's office based. Then eventually you …If you've not done it before then it's office based. Then eventually you can work remotely and even work for yourself if you wish with all the pros and cons that entails.


Ah shame, you'd think the trend Would be to get people out of offices these days.
Edited by: "snappyfish" 17th Aug
snappyfish17/08/2019 23:36

Ah shame, you'd think the trend Would be to get people out of offices …Ah shame, you'd think the trend Would be to get people out of offices these days.


Well you could end up as a digital nomad, but people that have that lifestyle have plenty of experience.
fishmaster18/08/2019 00:37

Well you could end up as a digital nomad, but people that have that …Well you could end up as a digital nomad, but people that have that lifestyle have plenty of experience.


My previous jov was retail, which involved mechanics and Web design, customer floor based.

No I work for myself from home. Doing mechanics collecting and fixing.

Love that freedom.

I meet so many people working from home. I don't see why so many people need to stare at each other in a dull office when you work on a computer.
snappyfish18/08/2019 08:35

My previous jov was retail, which involved mechanics and Web design, …My previous jov was retail, which involved mechanics and Web design, customer floor based.No I work for myself from home. Doing mechanics collecting and fixing.Love that freedom.I meet so many people working from home. I don't see why so many people need to stare at each other in a dull office when you work on a computer.


There's so much to learn to be a competent web dev. I'm not saying you can't work at home, but you'll be missing a large amount of skills learnt from an office based web job. Most of those jobs won't let juniors work remotely because they don't have the skills.
intikab17/08/2019 21:36

Coming up as 1.99 for me...


This freebie was about 10 Day's ago now ...

(And that's perhaps the reason as to why?).

OP .. perhaps your Freebie now needs expiring. :-)
Thanks guys - expired now.
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