St Patricks Days Costume Mens Irish Mascot Fancy Dress £13.94 from onefancydress / ebay
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St Patricks Days Costume Mens Irish Mascot Fancy Dress £13.94 from onefancydress / ebay

£13.94eBay Deals
10
Found 13th Mar 2016
Cast all the snakes out of parliament with this St Patrick blessed robe!

St Patrick

Includes: Robe, sash and headpiece
Brand new

One size- Chest 44" / Waist 36"-41" / Inside Leg 32"

Plus Size - Chest 48" / Waist 41"-46" / Inside Leg 33"
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10 Comments
Impressively tasteless.
Scary
Only Patricks Day post on here and its only four days away
yea, bet lots wear them here. Catolics.
According to the Confessio of Patrick, when he was about 16, he was captured by Irish pirates from his home in Great Britain, and taken as a slave to Ireland, looking after animals, where he lived for six years before escaping and returning to his family. After becoming a cleric, he returned to northern and western Ireland. In later life, he served as a bishop, but little is known about the places where he worked. By the seventh century, he had already come to be revered as the patron saint of Ireland.
belfastgeoff

yea, bet lots wear them here. Catolics.According to the Confessio of … yea, bet lots wear them here. Catolics.According to the Confessio of Patrick, when he was about 16, he was captured by Irish pirates from his home in Great Britain, and taken as a slave to Ireland, looking after animals, where he lived for six years before escaping and returning to his family. After becoming a cleric, he returned to northern and western Ireland. In later life, he served as a bishop, but little is known about the places where he worked. By the seventh century, he had already come to be revered as the patron saint of Ireland.


Thanks for that Geoff, good job.
belfastgeoff

yea, bet lots wear them here. Catolics.



Are they 'Catholic converters'?
belfastgeoff

yea, bet lots wear them here. Catolics.According to the Confessio of … yea, bet lots wear them here. Catolics.According to the Confessio of Patrick, when he was about 16, he was captured by Irish pirates from his home in Great Britain, and taken as a slave to Ireland, looking after animals, where he lived for six years before escaping and returning to his family. After becoming a cleric, he returned to northern and western Ireland. In later life, he served as a bishop, but little is known about the places where he worked. By the seventh century, he had already come to be revered as the patron saint of Ireland.



England. No GB back then. Even before Wales.

Amazing that the Irish Nationalists support Paddys day, an Englishman made a saint.
What nonsense, do even a modicum of research.......'Patrick (Patricius or Padrig) was born around 386 AD to wealthy parents. Patrick's birthplace is in fact debatable, with many believing that he was born in the still Welsh-speaking Northern Kingdom of Strathclyde of Romano-Brythonic stock, at Bannavem Taberniae. Others consider his birthplace to be in the south of Wales around the Severn estuary, or at St. Davids in Pembrokeshire, the tiny city of St Davids sitting directly on the seagoing missionary and trade routes to and from Ireland. His birth name was Maewyn Succat.'
More at....
Shaydog

What nonsense, do even a modicum of research.......'Patrick (Patricius or … What nonsense, do even a modicum of research.......'Patrick (Patricius or Padrig) was born around 386 AD to wealthy parents. Patrick's birthplace is in fact debatable, with many believing that he was born in the still Welsh-speaking Northern Kingdom of Strathclyde of Romano-Brythonic stock, at Bannavem Taberniae. Others consider his birthplace to be in the south of Wales around the Severn estuary, or at St. Davids in Pembrokeshire, the tiny city of St Davids sitting directly on the seagoing missionary and trade routes to and from Ireland. His birth name was Maewyn Succat.'More at....



Wales didn't exist then, and 'Welsh' wasn't spoken then either. The Celts at the time referred to themselves as Brythoniaid (Brythons or Britons). It was approx 600 yrs before Cymry was taken up to describe what is now Wales.

A Briton rather than an Englishman I concede.
simont_space

Wales didn't exist then, and 'Welsh' wasn't spoken then either. The Celts … Wales didn't exist then, and 'Welsh' wasn't spoken then either. The Celts at the time referred to themselves as Brythoniaid (Brythons or Britons). It was approx 600 yrs before Cymry was taken up to describe what is now Wales. A Briton rather than an Englishman I concede.


The Britons were an ancient Celtic people who lived in Great Britain from the Iron Age through the Roman and Sub-Roman periods. They were driven west to Wales and Ireland by the invading Anglo-Saxons who comprised people from Germanic tribes who migrated to the island from continental Europe. 'Briton' is also a Celtic word coming from the Insular Celtic language known as Common Brittonic.
I do love a bit of history.
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