Status Carbon Monoxide Alarm for £5 (down from £15) at Morrisons (instore) Crawley
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Status Carbon Monoxide Alarm for £5 (down from £15) at Morrisons (instore) Crawley

9
Posted 6th OctAvailable: National
I found this CO detector alarm at Morrisons in store (Crawley) reduced from £15 to £7.50 to £5. I noticed that this was posted here in past when found in B&M (hotukdeals.com/dea…595 , hotukdeals.com/dea…216) and Home bargain (hotukdeals.com/dea…726).

It's hard to find the reviews of this alarm. There is article in which site (which.co.uk/rev…ors) that contains reviews of some CO alarms and mentions some of them are "bad" but no mention of Status alarm - whether good or bad.

If this is not of bad quality then it's at cracking price.
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miaomiaobaubau07/10/2019 08:28

My personal opinion: wasting of money, it would not sound at all unless it …My personal opinion: wasting of money, it would not sound at all unless it is a serious matter. No way to test it as it does need huge amounts of carbon monoxide to start to sound and no sure if by then we will be dead. Not even you gas cooker with all the burners left on all day would trigger the alarm.


No interest in getting involved in arguments on here but as a gas service engineer for over 15 years I strongly disagree with the above and wouldn't like to think of someone deciding against having a CO alarm based on that sort of opinion.
Correct that if it sounds it's a serious matter and to highlight you want to know alarm you have is reliable which is why to ensure to buy somewhere reputable and get one that conforms to BS EN 50291. Not just for gas appliances either, recommended for anything that burns fossil fuels so coal fires,wood stoves etc, ideally one for each room containing such appliances correctly located in room as per instructions that come with alarm. I personally also think a good idea in any upstairs bedrooms that have chimneys or flues passing through them for appliances below but whether to go that far is personal choice. I have been called to properties over the years where a dangerous appliance or situation was found due to CO alarm activation, better to be safe than sorry.
Just make sure to note alarm life span and any requirement to change batteries etc per instructions. In my opinion best type of alarms are ones with sealed batteries that last the life of alarm and don't need replaced with the alarm giving an end of life intermittent chirp once expired. I once came across a CO spilling gas fire where the mains wired CO alarm in the room hadn't sounded as it was expired by several years, (as indicated by a label that was on the the rear) even though it still had a power indicator light on and sounded if pressed,the sensors don't last forever, usually 7-10 years max for CO alarms depending on model, some much less, should be indicated on packaging or instructions and ideally on alarm itself with ideally somewhere on label on rear to note down installation date.

Further info regarding buying somewhere reputable.

which.co.uk/new…53/
Edited by: "P1119" 7th Oct
9 Comments
Damn I were there this morning could have done with 1 as old one need replacing. BTW this store will be closing down in November. Heard the staff talking, shame as so conveniently placed in town😞
_P1506/10/2019 13:41

Damn I were there this morning could have done with 1 as old one need …Damn I were there this morning could have done with 1 as old one need replacing. BTW this store will be closing down in November. Heard the staff talking, shame as so conveniently placed in town😞


like mine in swindon
My personal opinion: wasting of money, it would not sound at all unless it is a serious matter. No way to test it as it does need huge amounts of carbon monoxide to start to sound and no sure if by then we will be dead. Not even you gas cooker with all the burners left on all day would trigger the alarm.
miaomiaobaubau07/10/2019 08:28

My personal opinion: wasting of money, it would not sound at all unless it …My personal opinion: wasting of money, it would not sound at all unless it is a serious matter. No way to test it as it does need huge amounts of carbon monoxide to start to sound and no sure if by then we will be dead. Not even you gas cooker with all the burners left on all day would trigger the alarm.


No interest in getting involved in arguments on here but as a gas service engineer for over 15 years I strongly disagree with the above and wouldn't like to think of someone deciding against having a CO alarm based on that sort of opinion.
Correct that if it sounds it's a serious matter and to highlight you want to know alarm you have is reliable which is why to ensure to buy somewhere reputable and get one that conforms to BS EN 50291. Not just for gas appliances either, recommended for anything that burns fossil fuels so coal fires,wood stoves etc, ideally one for each room containing such appliances correctly located in room as per instructions that come with alarm. I personally also think a good idea in any upstairs bedrooms that have chimneys or flues passing through them for appliances below but whether to go that far is personal choice. I have been called to properties over the years where a dangerous appliance or situation was found due to CO alarm activation, better to be safe than sorry.
Just make sure to note alarm life span and any requirement to change batteries etc per instructions. In my opinion best type of alarms are ones with sealed batteries that last the life of alarm and don't need replaced with the alarm giving an end of life intermittent chirp once expired. I once came across a CO spilling gas fire where the mains wired CO alarm in the room hadn't sounded as it was expired by several years, (as indicated by a label that was on the the rear) even though it still had a power indicator light on and sounded if pressed,the sensors don't last forever, usually 7-10 years max for CO alarms depending on model, some much less, should be indicated on packaging or instructions and ideally on alarm itself with ideally somewhere on label on rear to note down installation date.

Further info regarding buying somewhere reputable.

which.co.uk/new…53/
Edited by: "P1119" 7th Oct
P111907/10/2019 10:38

No interest in getting involved in arguments on here but as a gas service …No interest in getting involved in arguments on here but as a gas service engineer for over 15 years I strongly disagree with the above and wouldn't like to think of someone deciding against having a CO alarm based on that sort of opinion. Correct that if it sounds it's a serious matter and to highlight you want to know alarm you have is reliable which is why to ensure to buy somewhere reputable and get one that conforms to BS EN 50291. Not just for gas appliances either, recommended for anything that burns fossil fuels so coal fires,wood stoves etc, ideally one for each room containing such appliances correctly located in room as per instructions that come with alarm. I personally also think a good idea in any upstairs bedrooms that have chimneys or flues passing through them for appliances below but whether to go that far is personal choice. I have been called to properties over the years where a dangerous appliance or situation was found due to CO alarm activation, better to be safe than sorry.Just make sure to note alarm life span and any requirement to change batteries etc per instructions. In my opinion best type of alarms are ones with sealed batteries that last the life of alarm and don't need replaced with the alarm giving an end of life intermittent chirp once expired. I once came across a CO spilling gas fire where the mains wired CO alarm in the room hadn't sounded as it was expired by several years, (as indicated by a label that was on the the rear) even though it still had a power indicator light on and sounded if pressed,the sensors don't last forever, usually 7-10 years max for CO alarms depending on model, some much less, should be indicated on packaging or instructions and ideally on alarm itself with ideally somewhere on label on rear to note down installation date.Further info regarding buying somewhere reputable.https://www.which.co.uk/news/2016/10/unsafe-carbon-monoxide-detectors-named-and-shamed-by-which-454153/


Thanks for the input. I have a carbon monoxide battery operated appliance in use for the kitchen and it's been their 3.5 years since I bought the house ( and whatever beforehand). It sirens whilst depressed, so assumed that all is good (which it may be?) but never knew about the potential of the appliance not to genuinely work and safeguard beyond its expiry date.

When I get home I will check, if it needs replacing or close to expiry, in comes a new appliance.

Genuinely, thank you. Your input is hugely appreciated
Edited by: "bantamdave33" 7th Oct
P111907/10/2019 10:38

No interest in getting involved in arguments on here but as a gas service …No interest in getting involved in arguments on here but as a gas service engineer for over 15 years I strongly disagree with the above and wouldn't like to think of someone deciding against having a CO alarm based on that sort of opinion. Correct that if it sounds it's a serious matter and to highlight you want to know alarm you have is reliable which is why to ensure to buy somewhere reputable and get one that conforms to BS EN 50291. Not just for gas appliances either, recommended for anything that burns fossil fuels so coal fires,wood stoves etc, ideally one for each room containing such appliances correctly located in room as per instructions that come with alarm. I personally also think a good idea in any upstairs bedrooms that have chimneys or flues passing through them for appliances below but whether to go that far is personal choice. I have been called to properties over the years where a dangerous appliance or situation was found due to CO alarm activation, better to be safe than sorry.Just make sure to note alarm life span and any requirement to change batteries etc per instructions. In my opinion best type of alarms are ones with sealed batteries that last the life of alarm and don't need replaced with the alarm giving an end of life intermittent chirp once expired. I once came across a CO spilling gas fire where the mains wired CO alarm in the room hadn't sounded as it was expired by several years, (as indicated by a label that was on the the rear) even though it still had a power indicator light on and sounded if pressed,the sensors don't last forever, usually 7-10 years max for CO alarms depending on model, some much less, should be indicated on packaging or instructions and ideally on alarm itself with ideally somewhere on label on rear to note down installation date.Further info regarding buying somewhere reputable.https://www.which.co.uk/news/2016/10/unsafe-carbon-monoxide-detectors-named-and-shamed-by-which-454153/


Absolutely spot on.
bantamdave3307/10/2019 10:52

Thanks for the input. I have a carbon monoxide battery operated appliance …Thanks for the input. I have a carbon monoxide battery operated appliance in use for the kitchen and it's been their 3.5 years since I bought the house ( and whatever beforehand). It sirens whilst depressed, so assumed that all is good (which it may be?) but never knew about the potential of the appliance not to genuinely work and safeguard beyond its expiry date.When I get home I will check, if it needs replacing or close to expiry, in comes a new appliance.Genuinely, thank you. Your input is hugely appreciated


It will bleep if batteries need replacing. And if you replace batteries with new and it still bleeps it has expired and needs replacing.
It will tell you when it needs replacing. Trust me it will drive you mad lol.
Edited by: "peterdarlison2" 7th Oct
peterdarlison207/10/2019 21:25

It will bleep if batteries need replacing. And if you replace batteries …It will bleep if batteries need replacing. And if you replace batteries with new and it still bleeps it has expired and needs replacing.It will tell you when it needs replacing. Trust me it will drive you mad lol.


Lol been there n replaced it.
P111907/10/2019 10:38

No interest in getting involved in arguments on here but as a gas service …No interest in getting involved in arguments on here but as a gas service engineer for over 15 years I strongly disagree with the above and wouldn't like to think of someone deciding against having a CO alarm based on that sort of opinion. Correct that if it sounds it's a serious matter and to highlight you want to know alarm you have is reliable which is why to ensure to buy somewhere reputable and get one that conforms to BS EN 50291. Not just for gas appliances either, recommended for anything that burns fossil fuels so coal fires,wood stoves etc, ideally one for each room containing such appliances correctly located in room as per instructions that come with alarm. I personally also think a good idea in any upstairs bedrooms that have chimneys or flues passing through them for appliances below but whether to go that far is personal choice. I have been called to properties over the years where a dangerous appliance or situation was found due to CO alarm activation, better to be safe than sorry.Just make sure to note alarm life span and any requirement to change batteries etc per instructions. In my opinion best type of alarms are ones with sealed batteries that last the life of alarm and don't need replaced with the alarm giving an end of life intermittent chirp once expired. I once came across a CO spilling gas fire where the mains wired CO alarm in the room hadn't sounded as it was expired by several years, (as indicated by a label that was on the the rear) even though it still had a power indicator light on and sounded if pressed,the sensors don't last forever, usually 7-10 years max for CO alarms depending on model, some much less, should be indicated on packaging or instructions and ideally on alarm itself with ideally somewhere on label on rear to note down installation date.Further info regarding buying somewhere reputable.https://www.which.co.uk/news/2016/10/unsafe-carbon-monoxide-detectors-named-and-shamed-by-which-454153/


Thanks P119 for the details. On the back of this alarm, I found one number "EN 50291-1:2010+A1:2012". Though I don't know exact meaning it has quality standard number you mentioned. Please see attached image.
38629824-rXYvR.jpg
Edited by: "getcopy" 8th Oct
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