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Superior Erx630-t Touring E-bike (Shimano Steps Mid Drive) £1278.99 delivered (with code) @ Planet X
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Superior Erx630-t Touring E-bike (Shimano Steps Mid Drive) £1278.99 delivered (with code) @ Planet X

£1,278.99Planet X Deals
18
Posted 29th Aug
Saw this, looks reasonably good value from PlanetX online. Use code SIZZLING30 at checkout for this price (code valid until Aug31). Available in 19 & 21.5in sizes


More details
superiorbikes.eu/en/…red

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Top comments
dam..... thats ugly
for £1278.99 i would be hoping for something that looks a bit more cooler , than that...
Edited by: "paulkerr" 29th Aug
18 Comments
dam..... thats ugly
for £1278.99 i would be hoping for something that looks a bit more cooler , than that...
Edited by: "paulkerr" 29th Aug
The ladies' version is also available for £1,419.98 (including delivery)......
planetx.co.uk/i/q…ike
Edited by: "cutthroat_jake" 29th Aug
Looks very good for the final price but unsure how strong that rear rack is as it looks like it anchors to the mudguard on the right. Also Shimano state a up to 200km range but the battery is only 418Wh so really can only provide 250W for 1-1/2hrs but 200Km would be more like 10 hours riding so you'd have to be very sparing with the use of power. Maybe Shimano did their range tests in then Netherlands. My main complaint about these sort of bikes is the frame is purpose designed for the motor so either when the motor or battery fails which are often uneconomic to replace/fix the bike is a throwaway item. That is an issue with much proprietary parts on higher price bikes. You'd certainly want to check your warranty before purchase, Planet X can be fantastic value but they are a bit of a box shifter not taking much interest in supporting their customers after purchase. I guess my point is you don't want to be buying any high maintenance and more complex products from them.
Keep meaning to have a go at making mine in to an electric bike, Is this a better option than doing a conversion myself?
bonzobanana29/08/2020 11:07

Looks very good for the final price but unsure how strong that rear rack …Looks very good for the final price but unsure how strong that rear rack is as it looks like it anchors to the mudguard on the right. Also Shimano state a up to 200km range but the battery is only 418Wh so really can only provide 250W for 1-1/2hrs but 200Km would be more like 10 hours riding so you'd have to be very sparing with the use of power. Maybe Shimano did their range tests in then Netherlands. My main complaint about these sort of bikes is the frame is purpose designed for the motor so either when the motor or battery fails which are often uneconomic to replace/fix the bike is a throwaway item. That is an issue with much proprietary parts on higher price bikes. You'd certainly want to check your warranty before purchase, Planet X can be fantastic value but they are a bit of a box shifter not taking much interest in supporting their customers after purchase. I guess my point is you don't want to be buying any high maintenance and more complex products from them.


Yep, all valid points, which no doubt someone in the market for a mid drive entry level bike will have researched before making a purchase. This undercuts the likes of Cube, Raleigh, Trek, Scott, Kalkhoff etc and even Halfords for like for like spec, hence posting the deal
bonzobanana29/08/2020 11:07

Looks very good for the final price but unsure how strong that rear rack …Looks very good for the final price but unsure how strong that rear rack is as it looks like it anchors to the mudguard on the right. Also Shimano state a up to 200km range but the battery is only 418Wh so really can only provide 250W for 1-1/2hrs but 200Km would be more like 10 hours riding so you'd have to be very sparing with the use of power. Maybe Shimano did their range tests in then Netherlands. My main complaint about these sort of bikes is the frame is purpose designed for the motor so either when the motor or battery fails which are often uneconomic to replace/fix the bike is a throwaway item. That is an issue with much proprietary parts on higher price bikes. You'd certainly want to check your warranty before purchase, Planet X can be fantastic value but they are a bit of a box shifter not taking much interest in supporting their customers after purchase. I guess my point is you don't want to be buying any high maintenance and more complex products from them.


All good points which I agree with. Planet X's customer support is dreadful. You will basically be on your own if owt goes wrong.
greencat29/08/2020 18:09

All good points which I agree with. Planet X's customer support is …All good points which I agree with. Planet X's customer support is dreadful. You will basically be on your own if owt goes wrong.


Yeah, replacement owts are very hard to find! Fortunately they tend to be trouble free .
Bendown29/08/2020 12:34

Keep meaning to have a go at making mine in to an electric bike, Is this a …Keep meaning to have a go at making mine in to an electric bike, Is this a better option than doing a conversion myself?


I did my own with a 350w tsdz2. It's quite decent although heavy with the battery as well. Make sure you start with a light weight bike and disc brakes!
How does buying an ebike online work?

I have owned a ebike for few years, and usually have 1-3 manufacture warranty repairs along its life (on my second ebike now)

when no store how to fixed work?

I feel I have to buy an ebike from a shop that are qualified to get parts and repair them
Gumbon29/08/2020 21:41

How does buying an ebike online work?I have owned a ebike for few years, …How does buying an ebike online work?I have owned a ebike for few years, and usually have 1-3 manufacture warranty repairs along its life (on my second ebike now)when no store how to fixed work? I feel I have to buy an ebike from a shop that are qualified to get parts and repair them


I think with some like NCM you get authorisation to take to the bike store you nominate
dans197229/08/2020 19:59

I did my own with a 350w tsdz2. It's quite decent although heavy with the …I did my own with a 350w tsdz2. It's quite decent although heavy with the battery as well. Make sure you start with a light weight bike and disc brakes!


Whats your logic regarding lightweight bikes for ebike conversions, surely you'd want a bike to be as strong as possible to cope with the extra weight and extra forces of a motor unless you are going for a very low power motor unit maybe something like a Swytch kit.
bonzobanana30/08/2020 00:02

Whats your logic regarding lightweight bikes for ebike conversions, surely …Whats your logic regarding lightweight bikes for ebike conversions, surely you'd want a bike to be as strong as possible to cope with the extra weight and extra forces of a motor unless you are going for a very low power motor unit maybe something like a Swytch kit.


Just my bike is now really heavy and hard to move around the garage. When the battery runs out it's practically unusable due to it's weight.
dans197230/08/2020 08:43

Just my bike is now really heavy and hard to move around the garage. When …Just my bike is now really heavy and hard to move around the garage. When the battery runs out it's practically unusable due to it's weight.


Fair point, I guess it depends on the rider weight, if you are a heavy rider you'd definitely want to go with a strong bike, maybe if you are 90kg or more but less than that probably ok adding ebike components to a fairly lightweight frame. Ebike conversions can add from about 4kg to 14kg to the bike or possibly a lot more than that if you go for a huge capacity battery plus all the extra force applied through the frame or forks and wheels. If you have a bike with very low weight limits like lets say btwin bikes which are rated at a total load of 100kg (bike+rider+accessories+luggage) that would take most people well over the total load figure. Ebike conversions do increase the fatigue rate of frames and forks so more over-capacity in the total load figures would slow that fatigue. If you go with a mid-drive motor conversion they really need a very strong overbuilt bottom bracket area. If the rider is capable of lets say 300W and the mid-drive motor while rated to 250W but peaks at something like 600-750W (normal short bursts for most motors) you are applying up to 3x the power of a conventional bike to that bottom bracket area. Look at how commercial mid-drive ebikes are overbuilt around the bottom bracket area. Lastly the difference between an overbuilt bike may only be a couple of kg so personally I don't think its a night and day difference. If you have a lightweight bike at 12kg and an overbuilt bike at 14kg and you add a 2kg motor and 6kg battery its 20kg vs 22kg and an adjustment in gear ratios can make the 22kg easier up hills than the 20kg bike albeit at a slower speed.
bonzobanana30/08/2020 09:26

Fair point, I guess it depends on the rider weight, if you are a heavy …Fair point, I guess it depends on the rider weight, if you are a heavy rider you'd definitely want to go with a strong bike, maybe if you are 90kg or more but less than that probably ok adding ebike components to a fairly lightweight frame. Ebike conversions can add from about 4kg to 14kg to the bike or possibly a lot more than that if you go for a huge capacity battery plus all the extra force applied through the frame or forks and wheels. If you have a bike with very low weight limits like lets say btwin bikes which are rated at a total load of 100kg (bike+rider+accessories+luggage) that would take most people well over the total load figure. Ebike conversions do increase the fatigue rate of frames and forks so more over-capacity in the total load figures would slow that fatigue. If you go with a mid-drive motor conversion they really need a very strong overbuilt bottom bracket area. If the rider is capable of lets say 300W and the mid-drive motor while rated to 250W but peaks at something like 600-750W (normal short bursts for most motors) you are applying up to 3x the power of a conventional bike to that bottom bracket area. Look at how commercial mid-drive ebikes are overbuilt around the bottom bracket area. Lastly the difference between an overbuilt bike may only be a couple of kg so personally I don't think its a night and day difference. If you have a lightweight bike at 12kg and an overbuilt bike at 14kg and you add a 2kg motor and 6kg battery its 20kg vs 22kg and an adjustment in gear ratios can make the 22kg easier up hills than the 20kg bike albeit at a slower speed.


Every mid drive conversion I have ever seen uses a bike with the standard frame and normal size bottom bracket. The only exception is that carbon frames are not recommended. If you want good advice on a suitable donor bike, with advice from some very knowledgeable real world experienced folk, head over to the pedelecs forum
pedelecs.co.uk/for…42/
bonzobanana29/08/2020 11:07

Looks very good for the final price but unsure how strong that rear rack …Looks very good for the final price but unsure how strong that rear rack is as it looks like it anchors to the mudguard on the right. Also Shimano state a up to 200km range but the battery is only 418Wh so really can only provide 250W for 1-1/2hrs but 200Km would be more like 10 hours riding so you'd have to be very sparing with the use of power. Maybe Shimano did their range tests in then Netherlands. My main complaint about these sort of bikes is the frame is purpose designed for the motor so either when the motor or battery fails which are often uneconomic to replace/fix the bike is a throwaway item. That is an issue with much proprietary parts on higher price bikes. You'd certainly want to check your warranty before purchase, Planet X can be fantastic value but they are a bit of a box shifter not taking much interest in supporting their customers after purchase. I guess my point is you don't want to be buying any high maintenance and more complex products from them.


Certainly they won't be cheap to fix or replace but they should still be cheaper than buying a new bike. The one place you might get stung is labour costs, but a lot of motors and batteries are sealed units with connectors for the rest of the bike so unless your wiring loom needs replacing it won't take long to do.

That said this is the one point that scares me. I currently own a Bosch mid-drive ebike and one day it's going to need a new motor. I can't buy and fit those parts myself as far as I'm aware and Bosch don't publish their repair price lists. Thankfully it's saving me plenty over owning a car so it'd still be worthwhile fixing when it breaks.
rugman30/08/2020 09:41

Every mid drive conversion I have ever seen uses a bike with the standard …Every mid drive conversion I have ever seen uses a bike with the standard frame and normal size bottom bracket. The only exception is that carbon frames are not recommended. If you want good advice on a suitable donor bike, with advice from some very knowledgeable real world experienced folk, head over to the pedelecs forumhttps://www.pedelecs.co.uk/forum/forums/conversion-kits-general-discussion.42/


Obviously it would be a standard frame as its conversion but there is a big difference in strength between a lightweight road bike and an overbuilt mountain bike especially around the bottom bracket where mountain bikes can be very overbuilt due to the more extreme climbing and lower gear ratios.

Pedelecs forum seems to be run or sponsored by a commercial ebike company and replies to many forum posts suggesting his own products, some of which are quite low end with basic freewheels etc. It's a good forum but you need to be careful about some advice there as its heavily influenced by commercial interests. There are other forums which while not UK based have some great technical advice and posters like endless sphere.
CampGareth30/08/2020 11:19

Certainly they won't be cheap to fix or replace but they should still be …Certainly they won't be cheap to fix or replace but they should still be cheaper than buying a new bike. The one place you might get stung is labour costs, but a lot of motors and batteries are sealed units with connectors for the rest of the bike so unless your wiring loom needs replacing it won't take long to do.That said this is the one point that scares me. I currently own a Bosch mid-drive ebike and one day it's going to need a new motor. I can't buy and fit those parts myself as far as I'm aware and Bosch don't publish their repair price lists. Thankfully it's saving me plenty over owning a car so it'd still be worthwhile fixing when it breaks.


I seem to recall a story about a Brose motor that failed 5 times in warranty and the owner was faced with a possible $1000 plus fitting charge for the motor outside warranty and I can't remember if he sold it with a working motor before the warranty ran out or he had to sell it for scrap, its hard to remember exactly all the mid-drive motor failure threads on forums. However Brose and Bosch seem to be the main culprits although pretty sure Bosch is market leader for prebuilt mid-drive ebikes. You don't really hear the same stories about Bafang mid-drive motors that could be because they are a lot more reliable or simply parts are freely available so people can easily repair them themselves plus they may not have such a large market exposure.

This particular ebike probably wouldn't be economic to repair if there was a major fault with the motor that required replacement. It's going to be £600-1000 for the motor plus fitting and once your out of warranty the battery is likely a good part through its lifespan anyway. Saying that Shimano can be more reasonable for spares pricing and are generally more reliable and designed from the outset for a longer lifespan but still its a complicated motor with lots of parts that wear down and can fail like most mid-drive motors.
bonzobanana29/08/2020 11:07

Looks very good for the final price but unsure how strong that rear rack …Looks very good for the final price but unsure how strong that rear rack is as it looks like it anchors to the mudguard on the right. Also Shimano state a up to 200km range but the battery is only 418Wh so really can only provide 250W for 1-1/2hrs but 200Km would be more like 10 hours riding so you'd have to be very sparing with the use of power. Maybe Shimano did their range tests in then Netherlands. My main complaint about these sort of bikes is the frame is purpose designed for the motor so either when the motor or battery fails which are often uneconomic to replace/fix the bike is a throwaway item. That is an issue with much proprietary parts on higher price bikes. You'd certainly want to check your warranty before purchase, Planet X can be fantastic value but they are a bit of a box shifter not taking much interest in supporting their customers after purchase. I guess my point is you don't want to be buying any high maintenance and more complex products from them.


250w is the legal limit of e bike in the uk in europe. I wish it was something more sensible like 400-500w
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