Tails.com dog food trial (£1 delivery)
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Tails.com dog food trial (£1 delivery)

30
Found 1st Nov
Tails are offering a 1 month trial of their tailored made dog food for £1 and then the real price after the month but I got 12kg of dog food a scooper and 42 jelly meat and others pictures below
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30 Comments

not sure you get the month straight off - it offeres you 2 weeks and if you dont purchase after signing up you get a code through for a month

So where do we get the code from for the 1 month trial then? You need a code to sign up for the month trial...

Original Poster

furiousjammin4 m ago

So where do we get the code from for the 1 month trial then? You need a …So where do we get the code from for the 1 month trial then? You need a code to sign up for the month trial...


Click get deal the code should be their ?
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Edited by: "fitzyboy1690" 1st Nov

Original Poster

dazza1214 m ago

not sure you get the month straight off - it offeres you 2 weeks and if …not sure you get the month straight off - it offeres you 2 weeks and if you dont purchase after signing up you get a code through for a month


Offered me 1month I did it for a second dog after that on another account it only offered 2 weeks I'm sure if you say you have a big dog you get 1month and if you do a smaller dog you get 2 weeks

Mine just offering 14 day trial. Ive gone through the setup for having a medium/large dog and still offering 14 days

Original Poster

I would contact them then as their website states 1 month

furiousjammin1 m ago

Mine just offering 14 day trial. Ive gone through the setup for having a …Mine just offering 14 day trial. Ive gone through the setup for having a medium/large dog and still offering 14 days


go through the process - dont order anything after it has suggested your food - you will get an email in a day or 2 with an improved trial offer of 1 month - the code on here will only give you 14 days

Do they take the money for your 1st month after the 2 week trial?
Will the PayPal page only charge £1?
Edited by: "mymymy" 1st Nov

mymymy1 m ago

Do they take the money for your 1st month after the 2 week trial?


they do but you can pause or cancel it straight after your trial has been sent so you dont get charged anything

dazza1211 m ago

they do but you can pause or cancel it straight after your trial has been …they do but you can pause or cancel it straight after your trial has been sent so you dont get charged anything


You can start and stop really easily. I've never had any issues with them.

Original Poster

dazza12115 m ago

go through the process - dont order anything after it has suggested your …go through the process - dont order anything after it has suggested your food - you will get an email in a day or 2 with an improved trial offer of 1 month - the code on here will only give you 14 days


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Mines is saying 31 days ?
Edited by: "fitzyboy1690" 1st Nov

I did the one for 14 days, and then got an offer straight away giving me a code to give to friends for them to have 31 day free trial.
So for some unknown reason i only get 14 days, it seems everyone else on this thread got 31 days, and any friends that i recommend get 31 days. Why dont they like me? What did i do wrong? lol

tails.com/fet…7MR this code gives you a month as it says I can refer a friend with that code and it gives the friend a month
Edited by: "debdrfc" 1st Nov

try with code DARREGAK

tails.com/?pc…GAK
Edited by: "dazza121" 1st Nov

Bearing in mind you should introduce new food gradually by mixing with current food for a week or two, you're only really trailing it for a couple of weeks and then you have none left to mix if you go back to your original food.

If you know someone who is subscribed you get a month code HOLLYLTC

Also it is supposed to be for one dog but someone on MSE added all their dogs weights together and got a month for all of them!

DexMorgan34 m ago

Bearing in mind you should introduce new food gradually by mixing with …Bearing in mind you should introduce new food gradually by mixing with current food for a week or two, you're only really trailing it for a couple of weeks and then you have none left to mix if you go back to your original food.



But if you are mixxing it with the existing food then you will already be mixxing in the old food to go back onto. Its a paradox!
Pretty much just use this to bulk out normal food. If all else fails, i'll be putting it in a bowl at home on the table when the boys come round. After a few beers they'll think they are large peanuts. lol

is anybody getting wet food free?

if so, what breed are you using

thanks

DexMorgan1 h, 4 m ago

Bearing in mind you should introduce new food gradually by mixing with …Bearing in mind you should introduce new food gradually by mixing with current food for a week or two, you're only really trailing it for a couple of weeks and then you have none left to mix if you go back to your original food.



if they're hungry, they'll eat anything

my bro in law feeds his dog half on scraps incl chicken & duck & pork bones/ carcass (actually all bones but these ones are meant to be avoided) - he's never had any issues

luvsadealdealdeal11 m ago

if they're hungry, they'll eat anythingmy bro in law feeds his dog half on …if they're hungry, they'll eat anythingmy bro in law feeds his dog half on scraps incl chicken & duck & pork bones/ carcass (actually all bones but these ones are meant to be avoided) - he's never had any issues


True that they'll eat anything, and that's fine if your dog doesn't have a sensitive stomach like mine does!

The most important consideration here is not money saved but your animals welfare.

According to allaboutdogfood.co.uk Tails food sample had a carb level of 51% which is very high, and just 24% protein. For a premium kibble I'd want a better balance, carbs can be good for VERY active dogs, but in most all other cases you'd want to have a lower level. I'd also be interested in hearing how they create a 'bespoke' formula and how different it really is for each individual animal.

Here's the ingredients (as listed by AADF)

Total Meat Content 44.6%; Chicken 44.1% (Including 30.7% from Dehydrated Chicken, Maize, Sweet Potato, Beet Pulp, Potato, Maize Gluten Feed, Brown Rice, Maize Gluten food, Linseed, Seaweed Meal, Yeast, Brewer's Yeast, Gravy (Digest) 0.5%, Monocalcium Phosphate, Glucosamine, Sodium Chloride (salt).

So what does this mean? Well, here's what AADF says about the highlighted ingredients:

Maize (or corn to us Brits) is widely used in dry dog foods as an alternative to grains like rice, oats and barley. Of all of the grains used in dog food, maize is certainly amongst the most controversial, with vocal critics and supporters in equal measure.

It has to be said though that many of the most ardent supporters of maize are from within the pet food industry. They correctly argue that maize is a good quality, nutritious carbohydrate source with a comparable nutritional profile to grains like oats and barley.
Critics of maize, on the other hand, claim that it is harder for dogs to digest and is therefore much more likely to lead to food intolerance or allergies. Many canine nutritionists and some vets now recommend avoiding maize based diets altogether.

Maize gluten (sometimes called maize gluten meal, corn gluten or prairie meal) is a by-product of maize processing and can be used to top-up the protein levels of dog foods, usually as an alternative to more expensive meat-proteins. Unfortunately, maize gluten protein is not as easy for dogs to deal with as protein from meat sources and as a result it can lead to health issues like skin problems and hyperactivity. For this reason, we would recommend steering clear of maize gluten, especially with sensitive dogs.

Salt, or sodium chloride as it is often listed, is commonly added to pet foods as a flavour enhancer.
While salt is a necessary mineral, it is generally present in sufficient quantities in the raw ingredients of pet foods. However, since dogs, like humans, enjoy the taste of salt, extra is regularly added to dog foods to make them more appealing. Unfortunately, excessive salt has the same health implications for dogs as for us and should be avoided. This is particularly important if your dog has a history of heart problems or high blood pressure.

Potatoes are becoming more popular in dog foods as anti-grain sentiment continues to increase. Potatoes are predominantly made up of starch, although some varieties like russet potatoes are especially starchy. There is some debate over the ability of dogs to digest starch efficiently but where it is digested it is broken down into its constituent simple sugars. For this reason, starchy foods like potatoes may not be the best choice for diabetic dogs. Potatoes do however also contain some dietary fibre as well as vitamin C, vitamin B6 and potassium.

The full review from AADF can be found here: allaboutdogfood.co.uk/dog…ils and to be fair to Tails I should add this additional note from the same website: Tails create a 'bespoke' formula for each individual dog. The ones given here are simply intended to provide a general overview of the product for comparative purposes.

My personal advice would be to look around first and see what others are saying about this company and their products and other similar dog food manufacturers, the only problem here is some reviews look a little too good to be true and you have to wonder what was in it for the reviewer, on that basis you are simply left with trial and error. My personal experience, and the food that gave our dogs (we have both a large breed and the smallest breed) the least problems IE: hyper activity, skin issues, iffy poos etc was Eden - also reviewed on AADF here: allaboutdogfood.co.uk/dog…ood

In the last year, however, we have changed from kibble and decided to feed raw (frozen meat mince/tripe/offal + fruit/veg), we did this as the meal is completely customisable to each dogs needs, also, great levels of protein with no added nastys like salt, sugar, grain etc and carbs are low too. The results have been fantastic with the vet commenting on the dogs coat and how clean their teeth are.

Norse2 h, 25 m ago

The most important consideration here is not money saved but your animals …The most important consideration here is not money saved but your animals welfare. According to www.allaboutdogfood.co.uk Tails food sample had a carb level of 51% which is very high, and just 24% protein. For a premium kibble I'd want a better balance, carbs can be good for VERY active dogs, but in most all other cases you'd want to have a lower level. I'd also be interested in hearing how they create a 'bespoke' formula and how different it really is for each individual animal.Here's the ingredients (as listed by AADF)Total Meat Content 44.6%; Chicken 44.1% (Including 30.7% from Dehydrated Chicken, Maize, Sweet Potato, Beet Pulp, Potato, Maize Gluten Feed, Brown Rice, Maize Gluten food, Linseed, Seaweed Meal, Yeast, Brewer's Yeast, Gravy (Digest) 0.5%, Monocalcium Phosphate, Glucosamine, Sodium Chloride (salt).So what does this mean? Well, here's what AADF says about the highlighted ingredients:Maize (or corn to us Brits) is widely used in dry dog foods as an alternative to grains like rice, oats and barley. Of all of the grains used in dog food, maize is certainly amongst the most controversial, with vocal critics and supporters in equal measure.It has to be said though that many of the most ardent supporters of maize are from within the pet food industry. They correctly argue that maize is a good quality, nutritious carbohydrate source with a comparable nutritional profile to grains like oats and barley.Critics of maize, on the other hand, claim that it is harder for dogs to digest and is therefore much more likely to lead to food intolerance or allergies. Many canine nutritionists and some vets now recommend avoiding maize based diets altogether.Maize gluten (sometimes called maize gluten meal, corn gluten or prairie meal) is a by-product of maize processing and can be used to top-up the protein levels of dog foods, usually as an alternative to more expensive meat-proteins. Unfortunately, maize gluten protein is not as easy for dogs to deal with as protein from meat sources and as a result it can lead to health issues like skin problems and hyperactivity. For this reason, we would recommend steering clear of maize gluten, especially with sensitive dogs.Salt, or sodium chloride as it is often listed, is commonly added to pet foods as a flavour enhancer.While salt is a necessary mineral, it is generally present in sufficient quantities in the raw ingredients of pet foods. However, since dogs, like humans, enjoy the taste of salt, extra is regularly added to dog foods to make them more appealing. Unfortunately, excessive salt has the same health implications for dogs as for us and should be avoided. This is particularly important if your dog has a history of heart problems or high blood pressure.Potatoes are becoming more popular in dog foods as anti-grain sentiment continues to increase. Potatoes are predominantly made up of starch, although some varieties like russet potatoes are especially starchy. There is some debate over the ability of dogs to digest starch efficiently but where it is digested it is broken down into its constituent simple sugars. For this reason, starchy foods like potatoes may not be the best choice for diabetic dogs. Potatoes do however also contain some dietary fibre as well as vitamin C, vitamin B6 and potassium.The full review from AADF can be found here: https://www.allaboutdogfood.co.uk/dog-food-reviews/1334/tails and to be fair to Tails I should add this additional note from the same website: Tails create a 'bespoke' formula for each individual dog. The ones given here are simply intended to provide a general overview of the product for comparative purposes.My personal advice would be to look around first and see what others are saying about this company and their products and other similar dog food manufacturers, the only problem here is some reviews look a little too good to be true and you have to wonder what was in it for the reviewer, on that basis you are simply left with trial and error. My personal experience, and the food that gave our dogs (we have both a large breed and the smallest breed) the least problems IE: hyper activity, skin issues, iffy poos etc was Eden - also reviewed on AADF here: https://www.allaboutdogfood.co.uk/dog-food-reviews/0671/eden-dog-food In the last year, however, we have changed from kibble and decided to feed raw (frozen meat mince/tripe/offal + fruit/veg), we did this as the meal is completely customisable to each dogs needs, also, great levels of protein with no added nastys like salt, sugar, grain etc and carbs are low too. The results have been fantastic with the vet commenting on the dogs coat and how clean their teeth are.


I agree with your sentiment here completely - but this is a deal site not a what’s better site and £1 for 17kg of average rated food is a good deal (it’s rated similar to royal canin which I know is over hyped over priced and full of fillers)

DarrenJunipe-67669.4339153 m ago

I agree with your sentiment here completely - but this is a deal site not …I agree with your sentiment here completely - but this is a deal site not a what’s better site and £1 for 17kg of average rated food is a good deal (it’s rated similar to royal canin which I know is over hyped over priced and full of fillers)



Sure, but we're talking about the well-being of a third party that cannot speak for themselves. I would hope that most here would want the best for their animal.

In the short term, the deal here seems attractive, but as others have mentioned putting your dog through a change of food can take time (weeks) and if you have to change back to whatever you were previously feeding or new food then that can be traumatic for the animal. So that highlights one question, is it all really worth it to save a little?

Then we have to look at the possible behavioral changes, very high carbs will most likely have a negative effect on your animals mood unless they get the daily exercise of a racing greyhound! so that means you will both suffer.

In the longer term (should you decide to continue with Tails), this 3.3/5 kibble is actually more expensive per day than the 5/5 Eden kibble I have linked to. Eden is also well balanced with low carbs and high protein (similar to a wild dogs natural diet) it also has NO grains, so there is no logical reason to buy into what is seemingly a lesser product. Obviously, Eden is just an example food that I got on well with, there are many other 5/5 products listed on the AADF website that are more cost effective, yet having more suitable ingredients than the Tails product.

I know many will ignore this advice and I accept that as their personal choice, but if it makes one person stop and think then that's good enough for me.

I actually feed mine orijen which is another 5/5 food so as I said I agree with you. But this stuff is a lot better than most supermarket bought food like pedigree. Worst case it’s a really big bag of treats or a donation to a local dog rescue home.

DarrenJunipe-67669.433918 h, 39 m ago

I actually feed mine orijen which is another 5/5 food so as I said I agree …I actually feed mine orijen which is another 5/5 food so as I said I agree with you. But this stuff is a lot better than most supermarket bought food like pedigree. Worst case it’s a really big bag of treats or a donation to a local dog rescue home.


You'll get no argument from me regarding the quality of brands like Pedigree, you're also right about Tails food being superior in comparison (I'd be very concerned if it wasn't). The main issue is most here won't stick with it, so a few weeks later the dog will be back on the supermarket rubbish again (if that's what was previously being fed) or changed to another food type, with all these changes happening in a short period of time, which highlights my point above is it really worth it?

I was going to bring up the idea of donating this product to a rescue centre, but again, would it result in hyper dogs due to the very high carbs? Not an ideal situation where many dogs are held together or where a potential new owner comes to meet the animal.

For more info on hightend carbs and dogs please do google: high carbs and hyper dogs

At the end of the day the choice here is with the pet owner, I'm just highlighting potential issues. I am happy to hear that you are feeding a quality food though, Orijen is a fantastic product and one we tried. Unfortunately, our small dogs didn't get on with it so we went over to Eden. Now we've made a change to raw as it offers everything nutritionally and can be adapted to each animal with relative ease.

Lastly, If anyone from Tails is reading this and feels it unjust or that AADF findings are incorrect (maybe you've since changed the ingredients in your kibble) then please do leave a comment, as I'm not looking to tarnish the name of any good dog food manufacturer, I am simply pointing out the apparent high carb content and the potential associated issues.

i would say on the high carbs side of things (aadf wont have tried all combinations of food) that you can adjust your dog settings to change the content of the food (i know it makes a mockery of the tailored specifically for your dog aspect - but thats just a gimmick anyway) i played with the settings for what can and cant be included and got up to 65/35 mixture (which isnt too bad and grain free).

But like you said you should go into it thinking its a permanent food change if your dog gets on with it rather than just a month and change again. so you need to look at the ongoing cost after the trial - although nothing stopping people getting a second or 3rd free trial if you have a different address you can get it delivered too
We are also looking to switch to Raw once our pup is over a year old (cost of raw food for a growing puppy is 4 times the cost of a maintaining feed!)

dazza12121 h, 0 m ago

We are also looking to switch to Raw once our pup is over a year old (cost …We are also looking to switch to Raw once our pup is over a year old (cost of raw food for a growing puppy is 4 times the cost of a maintaining feed!)


Good to hear, although feeding a puppy raw isn't as expensive as you may think. Sure, if you buy the pre-made, branded stuff in a fancy labelled tub then the cost will be high. However, huge savings can be achieved by buying straight frozen mince. Just make sure to vary the meat/tripe/offal etc so the dog gets all their nutritional needs (yes there's a little science to it but it's really not hard).

Many frozen petfood companies now supply the raw mince in small convenient bags (approx 500g) so it defrosts quicker and is easier to manage (we try to maximise the savings so have a large separate freezer and order bulk 5kg blocks - 50lb of chicken/tripe mix is just over £26).

There's a huge range of different meats to choose from IE: chicken, duck, lamb, venison, game, fish etc etc then you can treat the dogs on things like raw chicken feet/heads/wings/necks, paddywack, pigs ears and obviously various different bones (all dependent on the size of the animal).

So there's no real reason not to give it a go and give your dog a great start in life. There's a ton of info to be found via a google search or just give me a shout and I'll happily give advice.

Code for one month trial for £1 MARKV2VN

Only rated 3.9 out of 5 on which dog food.
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