TeckNet® M002 2.4G Nano Cordless Optical Mouse - 18 Month Battery Life - Battery Level Indicator - 2.4 GHz -3 Adjustable DPI Levels: 2000/1500/1000dPi - Nano USB wireless receiver - Red OR Black £7.99 @ AMAZON sold by UNICHAIN.
339°Expired

TeckNet® M002 2.4G Nano Cordless Optical Mouse - 18 Month Battery Life - Battery Level Indicator - 2.4 GHz -3 Adjustable DPI Levels: 2000/1500/1000dPi - Nano USB wireless receiver - Red OR Black £7.99 @ AMAZON sold by UNICHAIN.

12
Found 21st Aug 2013
I know...been posted month ago but not at this price

GREAT REVIEWS!!

Colour:RED and BLACK for £7.99

or GREY for £8.97

Adopt the 2.4G frequency technology, working distance can reach to 8M-15M, 2.4G will give you a more comfortable, convenient and exact effect than the traditional FM radio wireless mouse
USB Nano Receiver, stays in your PC, so there's no need to unplug it when you move around. DPI button to select favourite cursor speed, 2000/1500/1000dpi, to suit both ordinary and gaming needs.
Auto Power Off (APO): the mouse will be switched off automatically when the USB Nano receiver is disconnected with your pc, or the PC is switched off
18-month battery life on 1 AA battery practically eliminates the need to replace batteries. Battery life may vary based on user and computing conditions
With Battery Level Indicator, will let you know when power levels are running low.

12 Comments

wonder whether the led will be on when the mouse is working

current owners: Is this optical or laser?

Good little mouse. However on a mac the side buttons aren't used and also you seem to need to turn it on and off sometimes to get it to connect.

No idea how to adjust the DPI.

edge360

Good little mouse. However on a mac the side buttons aren't used and also … Good little mouse. However on a mac the side buttons aren't used and also you seem to need to turn it on and off sometimes to get it to connect. No idea how to adjust the DPI.



You press the button behind the scroll wheel and hold it in for a second or two, adjusts the dpi.

current owners: Is this optical or laser?

optical
Edited by: "paul.o" 21st Aug 2013

Voted COLD, I have had one of these for around ten months and change the battery every two weeks or so, I have tried decent duracell and re-chargeable batteries and feel that the advertised battery life is well over exaggerated. Other than that its not a bad little mouse if like me you have loads of re-chargeable batteries to spare.


Anthonis

current owners: Is this optical or laser?


Its Cordless Optical mouse.

Renegade01

You press the button behind the scroll wheel and hold it in for a second … You press the button behind the scroll wheel and hold it in for a second or two, adjusts the dpi.



Ahh cheers

Renegade01

Voted COLD, I have had one of these for around ten months and change the … Voted COLD, I have had one of these for around ten months and change the battery every two weeks or so, I have tried decent duracell and re-chargeable batteries and feel that the advertised battery life is well over exaggerated. Other than that its not a bad little mouse if like me you have loads of re-chargeable batteries to spare.Its Cordless Optical mouse.



I got sent a Tecknet optical wireless mouse as a promotional gift. There was something about battery saving technology in the bumf. There is no physical switch on it, it relies totally on sensing if somone is using it and a sleep mode. Had it for 6 months and not had to change the battery so far. It only gets light usage but for sure its sleep mode power consumption is minimal. Will have to dig out the model number to see if it the same as the one posted here.
Edited by: "buglawton" 21st Aug 2013

My experience with numerous mice is their varying power consumption and the lack of information of any sort to give potential buyers any real idea how efficient that they might be in that respect, makes it difficult to find one I would want to buy. The general experience I have had is that if the mouse is from either Logitech or Microsoft, the battery usage will typically be good, ie maybe several months, unless it is a touch-sensitive one, where it has been significantly higher. If it is a no-name brand, then it is a lottery but generally I have found that a battery or set of batteries will last two, three weeks tops. The outcome of that is that I have ended up buying what looks like a bargain mouse that simply costs a small fortune in batteries. I have either returned or junked several mice on that score, including Tesco and Asda branded mice. (Don't ask)!

As an aside, I have given up on touch-sensitive mice for the present because the couple I have bought have been very frustrating to use, failing to respond properly to touches and strokes or reacting when I have made no attempt to make them react. I have also found that the sensors seem to degrade in terms of quality of response over a long period of use as if the sensors are just 'wearing' out.

I would point out that I use my mice A LOT and that my experience will not be the experience of others. However, as far as I am concerned, particularly as a left-hander, I have yet to find a single mouse, over more than twenty years of computing, that I can say that I would buy again. And even if I did, I will bet that I would not be able to buy it again as it will have been replaced by another model, such is the relentless march of progress.

The only mandatory prerequisite I have of a mouse, other than good battery usage is that the ruddy thing should actually be usable and that I am generally unaware that I am using it, that it just like using the gear stick in a car. That it just works and that I am unaware that I am having to work at making it work. I am absolutely done with tugging constantly at a corded mouse. That is definitely a no-no nowadays. I don't game, so absolute response times are of no importance to me.

The search for the mouse equivalent of the Holy Grail continues, for me, at least.

I'm still searching for a good mouse and keyboard. I had a Logitech mouse that lasted a good 5yrs, the wheel button failed, Logitech sent me a brand new mouse. Good warranty.

I'm using the Perixx 712. Nice mouse but the side buttons are loud and irritating. Why didn't they use the same microswitches as the l/r buttons.

What about this mouse?
dx.com/p/g…ate

pcplod

My experience with numerous mice is their varying power consumption and … My experience with numerous mice is their varying power consumption and the lack of information of any sort to give potential buyers any real idea how efficient that they might be in that respect, makes it difficult to find one I would want to buy. The general experience I have had is that if the mouse is from either Logitech or Microsoft, the battery usage will typically be good, ie maybe several months, unless it is a touch-sensitive one, where it has been significantly higher. If it is a no-name brand, then it is a lottery but generally I have found that a battery or set of batteries will last two, three weeks tops. The outcome of that is that I have ended up buying what looks like a bargain mouse that simply costs a small fortune in batteries. I have either returned or junked several mice on that score, including Tesco and Asda branded mice. (Don't ask)!As an aside, I have given up on touch-sensitive mice for the present because the couple I have bought have been very frustrating to use, failing to respond properly to touches and strokes or reacting when I have made no attempt to make them react. I have also found that the sensors seem to degrade in terms of quality of response over a long period of use as if the sensors are just 'wearing' out.I would point out that I use my mice A LOT and that my experience will not be the experience of others. However, as far as I am concerned, particularly as a left-hander, I have yet to find a single mouse, over more than twenty years of computing, that I can say that I would buy again. And even if I did, I will bet that I would not be able to buy it again as it will have been replaced by another model, such is the relentless march of progress.The only mandatory prerequisite I have of a mouse, other than good battery usage is that the ruddy thing should actually be usable and that I am generally unaware that I am using it, that it just like using the gear stick in a car. That it just works and that I am unaware that I am having to work at making it work. I am absolutely done with tugging constantly at a corded mouse. That is definitely a no-no nowadays. I don't game, so absolute response times are of no importance to me.The search for the mouse equivalent of the Holy Grail continues, for me, at least.



What about the Apple wireless 'magic mouse'?
apple.com/mag…se/
I use one and once it has been configured to have a right click (took me several months realise I could do this - doh!) it is near perfect on MacOS at least. I use NiMiH rechargables in it and they last months. You would think it would be heavy but it does not feel so.
Anyone successfully configured one of these for Windows or tried it with Boot Camp/Parallels?

Just in case anyone ever comes back to this old offer and wonders about the battery life horror stories, I've had one of these in heavy, daily use for almost three months and it's still going strong on the same bog-standard AA battery. The mouse is comfortable to use and very responsive - even with the USB receiver plugged in behind my monitor (so there's no line-of-sight) and several wifi and 3G devices around. The mouse turns itself off when it's not been used for several minutes and a double-click brings it instantly back to life.

I wouldn't hesitate recommending it.
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