Tesco OFR1K10 Oil filled Radiator £19.97 @ Free Delivery To Store
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Tesco OFR1K10 Oil filled Radiator £19.97 @ Free Delivery To Store

65
Found 27th Oct 2012
Tesco OFR1K10 Oil filled Radiator £19.97

Great little oil heater and cant find one cheaper


Product Details

The Tesco OFRIK10 oil filled radiator is a handy way of adding extra warmth to any room in your home that may need it. Simply wheel it in, plug it in and select from 3 heat settings. You can gradually heat the room on a low setting or select the highest setting for immediate results. The Tesco oil filled radiator is protected against overheating and is filled with environmental production oil.

Product specifications
Key Information
Type Oil filled
Colour White
Power
Power (kW) 1
Power Source Electricity
Features
Heat Settings 3
Variable Thermostat Y
Timer N
Overheat Protection Y
Safety Tilt Switch Y
Frost Protection N
Additional Information
Is Hazardous Material N
Dimensions
Product Height 60.5 CM
Product Width 12.0
Product Depth 27.0
Product Weight 5.4 KG

65 Comments

Banned

should get hot

It seems like RRP ? So where is the deal here .....

Original Poster

pantaiema

It seems like RRP ? So where is the deal here .....



RRP is £29.99

Got something similar with a higher power rating in lidl for 40 and with 3 year warranty.

very low power output. you will struggle to heat up any decent size room.
if you can go for 2kw.

Coincidence, but I bought this same one today. My daughter's bedroom is always a bit colder than the rest of the house so I wanted something to warm her room a little in the night, rather than having the central heating on. Cheapest oil filled rad I could find. Heats up quickly so I'm sure it will be fine for my needs.

If it had been for more than a bit of background heat or the room was bigger than I would have spent a bit more for a higher output unit

Banned

Cold as the room this poor thing is destined not to heat

Original Poster

squillion

This one's cheaper … This one's cheaper http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/cheapest-filled-radiator-market-junior-7-fin-filled-radiator-17-99-dunelm-mill-1345917




ye it is but only 600w what is your point?

does it consume a lot of electricity like fan heater?

mackenfy

does it consume a lot of electricity like fan heater?


It consumes the electricity it states it consumes, i.e. 1kW. If you're asking if you get more heat out of this for a given cost of electricity than a fan heater then the answer is no - they are all identical.

Alinshearah

should get hot



Better had otherwise it is going back !

pibpob

It consumes the electricity it states it consumes, i.e. 1kW. If you're … It consumes the electricity it states it consumes, i.e. 1kW. If you're asking if you get more heat out of this for a given cost of electricity than a fan heater then the answer is no - they are all identical.



That's not quite true. The amount of heat energy you get out for your 1kW of electricity will vary depending on the design of the appliance. Best case scenario is a coefficient of performance of 1 - ie. 1kW of electricity gives 1kW of heat - which would apply to most electric heaters with an element. In practice, it will be less. For example, if your heater is a fan heater, some of your input energy goes to powering the fan. If your heater has a bar that glows red hot, you're losing some of your energy to light.

Oil filled heaters are great for background heating. As the oil acts as a heat reservoir, the heat is released more evenly and gradually than a fan heater. You're not getting any more heat energy for your unit of electricity than, say, a bar heater, but you may find you can maintain a more consistent and comfortable room temperature compared to a heater that is "all or nothing" (on or off) like a bar heater or fan heater. People tend to compensate for the uneven heating and cooling off effect of fan or bar heaters by turning the thermostat up higher, and you may find that costs more than running an oil-filled heater.

as far as the specs say, it consumes 1KW

pibpob

It consumes the electricity it states it consumes, i.e. 1kW. If you're … It consumes the electricity it states it consumes, i.e. 1kW. If you're asking if you get more heat out of this for a given cost of electricity than a fan heater then the answer is no - they are all identical.



Rubbish, over a longer period of time it is cheaper to run than a fan heater- mostly cause its switching on and off all the time but stays boiling hot... fan heaters just go cold as soon as powers cut, it's not instant heat though so having both is best

pardon my ignorance but how is this method of warming a room cheaper than central heating?? I have a young child and keep the central heating on constant at a temperature of 19 degrees but I also get a huge bill.Was wondering whether these oil filled radiators would be cheaper to run. By the way.. My energy supplier is British Gas in West Yorkshire and I never get past primary usage

akdeal

That's not quite true. The amount of heat energy you get out for your … That's not quite true. The amount of heat energy you get out for your 1kW of electricity will vary depending on the design of the appliance. Best case scenario is a coefficient of performance of 1 - ie. 1kW of electricity gives 1kW of heat - which would apply to most electric heaters with an element. In practice, it will be less. For example, if your heater is a fan heater, some of your input energy goes to powering the fan. If your heater has a bar that glows red hot, you're losing some of your energy to light.Oil filled heaters are great for background heating. As the oil acts as a heat reservoir, the heat is released more evenly and gradually than a fan heater. You're not getting any more heat energy for your unit of electricity than, say, a bar heater, but you may find you can maintain a more consistent and comfortable room temperature compared to a heater that is "all or nothing" (on or off) like a bar heater or fan heater. People tend to compensate for the uneven heating and cooling off effect of fan or bar heaters by turning the thermostat up higher, and you may find that costs more than running an oil-filled heater.



The air movement, light and noise all ultimately end up as heat. There is no difference at all between one heater and another, they are all 100% efficient.

MeistroUK

Rubbish, over a longer period of time it is cheaper to run than a fan … Rubbish, over a longer period of time it is cheaper to run than a fan heater- mostly cause its switching on and off all the time but stays boiling hot... fan heaters just go cold as soon as powers cut, it's not instant heat though so having both is best



No, it isn't. An oil filled heater and a fan heater, both rated 1kW will use exactly the same amount of electricity to produce the same amount of heat.

Not the most powerful but more efficient than fan heaters as pointed out.
Heat.

cybergibbons

No, it isn't. An oil filled heater and a fan heater, both rated 1kW will … No, it isn't. An oil filled heater and a fan heater, both rated 1kW will use exactly the same amount of electricity to produce the same amount of heat.



True, but this radiator will still give out heat for an appreciable length of time when the power is off. Turn off a fan heater and the heat is gone instantly.

Rom

Not the most powerful but more efficient than fan heaters as pointed … Not the most powerful but more efficient than fan heaters as pointed out.Heat.



No, they aren't any more efficient.

Banned

what about holagen heaters. wilkos for 14.99

Fan heaters are good for spot heating. These are good for long term heating. If you've got central heating a fan heater is much better as you can use it instantly while your central heating warms up.

cybergibbons

No, they aren't any more efficient.


Yes they are as they retain heat after powering off i.e. getting to temp where as already said a fan heater will loose heat instantly when turned off.

Central heating would be cheaper to run though.

From Uswitch



The main kinds of portable electric heaters are:

oil-filled radiators,
convector heaters,
fan heaters,
halogen heaters.

None of these is much more energy-efficient than the others. However, halogen heaters heat up and cool down more quickly, and fan heaters are also relatively quick to heat up and cool down, with the added advantage that they blow the heat to where it is needed. Halogen heaters also tend to use up the smallest amount of space, followed by fan heaters.

If children or other vulnerable people are around, you should take extra care with portable heaters. An oil filled radiator in particular may be unsuitable, because of the high temperatures they can reach, which could harm anyone touching them.

There should be plenty of space around individual heating devices, especially fan heaters, as they need to draw in air, and halogen heaters that have an oscillating movement.

Stand-alone electrical heating devices will usually be less wasteful if they have thermostatic controls - in other words, if they have the capability of switching themselves off once a particular temperature has been reached. If a device doesn’t have such a facility, a separate plug-in thermostat can be purchased.

Given that portable electric heating devices use electricity, they’re generally not as cost effective as central heating systems running on gas or oil.


alisha123 your best bet is to fit thermostatic controls to individual radiators, that allows you to set each room temp on its own , so you could have your little ones room warm and still have the other rooms cooler, try here screwfix.com/c/h…hhv!-55391754
Edited by: "mfactor" 28th Oct 2012

darksideby182

Yes they are as they retain heat after powering off i.e. getting to temp … Yes they are as they retain heat after powering off i.e. getting to temp where as already said a fan heater will loose heat instantly when turned off.Central heating would be cheaper to run though.



The heat that an oil filled radiator gives out when it is off was put there when it was turned on. The fan heater has already dumped the heat into the room. They are both 100% efficient. Where would an electric heater waste energy? Is it lifting something? Pumping a fluid? No. All of the input energy turns to heat.

I honestly don't understand why this seems to be such a difficult concept for many, I'm presuming science teaching isn't up to scratch.

Is this offer in-store as well as online?

We have one of these for the extension where our dog is ( no central heating there) its slow to heat up but its just on v low 24/7

cybergibbons

The heat that an oil filled radiator gives out when it is off was put … The heat that an oil filled radiator gives out when it is off was put there when it was turned on. The fan heater has already dumped the heat into the room. They are both 100% efficient. Where would an electric heater waste energy? Is it lifting something? Pumping a fluid? No. All of the input energy turns to heat.I honestly don't understand why this seems to be such a difficult concept for many, I'm presuming science teaching isn't up to scratch.


So you put a oil filled heater on for 20 mins and a fan heater on for 20 mins they are both 1kw the oil filed will heat the area once the 20 mins are over because it stores heat , the fan heater does not heat the area after being turned off.

Also if running both over a long period of time the oil filed heater would not need to be on as much as the fan heater , look into eco 7 storage heaters for a similar reason as this what gets installed in housing with no gas.
Edited by: "darksideby182" 28th Oct 2012

But after the 20 mins the room with the fan heater will be at a higher temperature. The oil filled radiator will release the energy more slowly as the oil is acting as a buffer. The amount of power consumed will be the same but the temperature of the room with the oil filled radiator will be more even.
Edited by: "Zub" 28th Oct 2012

darksideby182

So you put a oil filled heater on for 20 mins and a fan heater on for 20 … So you put a oil filled heater on for 20 mins and a fan heater on for 20 mins they are both 1kw the oil filed will heat the area once the 20 mins are over because it stores heat , the fan heater does not heat the area after being turned off. Also if running both over a long period of time the oil filed heater would not need to be on as much as the fan heater , look into eco 7 storage heaters for a similar reason as this what gets installed in housing with no gas.



Both have used .33kWh, both will produce the same amount of heat energy, just the oil filled heater will take longer to transfer this to the air in the room. It has absolutely nothing to do with efficiency though.

Economy 7 uses cheap electricity at night. They are also 100% efficient, but you are paying less for the energy.

Just answer this - if a heater is not 100% efficient, where does the wasted energy go?

terriclarkfan

True, but this radiator will still give out heat for an appreciable … True, but this radiator will still give out heat for an appreciable length of time when the power is off. Turn off a fan heater and the heat is gone instantly.


But that heat released after it's been switched off is exactly balanced by the heat not given off instantly when it's switched on! Does no-one know the law of conservation of energy any more? It's very basic physics.

My point stands - the amount of heat obtained from a certain amount of electrical energy (and hence cost) is exactly the same from this as with a fan heater.

A dumb question. Electric cost 4 time more than gas. is that mean central heating using gas is cheaper than radiator?

darksideby182

So you put a oil filled heater on for 20 mins and a fan heater on for 20 … So you put a oil filled heater on for 20 mins and a fan heater on for 20 mins they are both 1kw the oil filed will heat the area once the 20 mins are over because it stores heat , the fan heater does not heat the area after being turned off.


And the oil heater doesn't start to heat the area until some time after it's been switched on, because it's heating the oil instead.

Also if running both over a long period of time the oil filed heater … Also if running both over a long period of time the oil filed heater would not need to be on as much as the fan heater


No, it would be on more if anything, because it's less useful as you have to anticipate switching it on and off in order to use the heat most efficiently.

look into eco 7 storage heaters for a similar reason as this what gets … look into eco 7 storage heaters for a similar reason as this what gets installed in housing with no gas.

Look at them yourself. Does a storage heater produce heat instantly it's switched on? No - it needs to heat the bricks. The only reason why it's cheaper than other types of electric heater is that you can use the electricity at cheaper times. It is no more or less efficient at turning electricity into heat than fan heaters, oil-filled radiators or convection heaters.

MeistroUK

Rubbish


Oh dear oh dear!

alisha123

pardon my ignorance but how is this method of warming a room cheaper than … pardon my ignorance but how is this method of warming a room cheaper than central heating?? I have a young child and keep the central heating on constant at a temperature of 19 degrees but I also get a huge bill.Was wondering whether these oil filled radiators would be cheaper to run. By the way.. My energy supplier is British Gas in West Yorkshire and I never get past primary usage


You should be as canny as possible with your heating by switching off radiators that you don't need. It's laborious but it will save you money. If you were to heat one room with electricity and have the rest of the house cold, as opposed to heating the whole house with gas, you might save some money but you'll save more if you heat one room with gas instead of electricity.

Also, another worrying misunderstanding about heating systems is that it costs less to keep the heat on low at night and boost it during the day than it does to switch it off when not needed. It costs more to set it back than switch it off - you are using more heat and a boiler working hard to bring a cold house up to temperature is actually more efficient than a boiler coming on occasionally to maintain that temperature.
Edited by: "pibpob" 28th Oct 2012

darksideby182

So you put a oil filled heater on for 20 mins and a fan heater on for 20 … So you put a oil filled heater on for 20 mins and a fan heater on for 20 mins they are both 1kw the oil filed will heat the area once the 20 mins are over because it stores heat , the fan heater does not heat the area after being turned off.

Also if running both over a long period of time the oil filed heater … Also if running both over a long period of time the oil filed heater would not need to be on as much as the fan heater

look into eco 7 storage heaters for a similar reason as this what gets … look into eco 7 storage heaters for a similar reason as this what gets installed in housing with no gas.


Why would you need to switch the unit off and on when either the stat for the oil temp will switch the element off or the thermostat on the unit will turn it off when the area has reached the temp required also most storage heaters have a boost element for instant heat. As i said earlier gas central heating is more cost efficient.

You will also find most oil filed rads are 1kw or less and fan or convectors type heaters are 1kw or more.

Zub

But after the 20 mins the room with the fan heater will be at a higher … But after the 20 mins the room with the fan heater will be at a higher temperature. The oil filled radiator will release the energy more slowly as the oil is acting as a buffer. The amount of power consumed will be the same but the temperature of the room with the oil filled radiator will be more even.

No it won't. It will be more laggy. And that is usually more inconvenient.

Oil-filled radiators are quieter, safer (hot element surrounded) and theoretically longer-lived (no moving parts) than fan heaters. They are not more efficient, they are bulkier per unit heat and they are less responsive.

darksideby182

Why would you need to switch the unit off and on when either the stat for … Why would you need to switch the unit off and on when either the stat for the oil temp will switch the element off or the thermostat on the unit will turn it off when the area has reached the temp required


I'm talking about when you start to use the space and finish using it. If you leave the heater on for 24 hours a day you might as well be heating the room by burning £5 notes.

also most storage heaters have a boost element for instant heat.


That's just a conventional element, which will cost exactly the same amount to run as any other heater using expensive-rate electricity. What's your point?

As i said earlier gas central heating is more cost efficient.


Yes - usually: see my response to the question about that.

You will also find most oil filed rads are 1kw or less and fan or … You will also find most oil filed rads are 1kw or less and fan or convectors type heaters are 1kw or more.


Yes, because as I've mentioned, they are bulky as they are less efficient at transferring heat from heater into room (NOT the same as being less efficient at converting electricity to heat). What's your point? Lower power = less heat. They will only cost less to run because your room will be colder!
Edited by: "pibpob" 28th Oct 2012

darksideby182

Why would you need to switch the unit off and on when either the stat … Why would you need to switch the unit off and on when either the stat for the oil temp will switch the element off or the thermostat on the unit will turn it off when the area has reached the temp required

also most storage heaters have a boost element for instant heat.

As i said earlier gas central heating is more cost efficient.

You will also find most oil filed rads are 1kw or less and fan or … You will also find most oil filed rads are 1kw or less and fan or convectors type heaters are 1kw or more.



Edited by: "darksideby182" 28th Oct 2012
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