Unfortunately, this deal is no longer available

The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky FREE Kindle Ebook @ Amazon

Posted 27th May 2020

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Amazon Delivery & Returns Information

The following delivery costs are for orders fulfilled by Amazon. Delivery costs charged by third-party sellers on Amazon may vary, shown at checkout.

If you're a UK customer, you can get unlimited One-Day Delivery at no extra cost as part of Amazon Prime. No minimum spend is required to qualify.

Orders that include £10 or more of eligible books qualify for FREE Delivery. All orders of £20 or more of eligible items across any product category also qualify for FREE Delivery in the UK.

Standard Pickup to any Pickup Location across any product category qualifies for FREE Standard Pickup. Terms and Conditions apply.

Media costs £3.99 per delivery. Media consists of books, music, DVDs, video games, and software. All other product categories cost £4.99 per delivery. There is no extra cost for Amazon Prime members

From Amazon EU Media costs £2.99 per Standard Delivery / £3.99 Priority Delivery. Media consists of books, music, DVDs, video games, and software. All other product categories cost £4.49 per Standard Delivery £4.99 Priority Delivery. There is no extra cost for Amazon Prime members.

From Amazon US the delivery rate is £2.99 per delivery and £2.99 per KG (or part thereof)

Please see the Footer of Amazon page for further information on Delivery, Returns, and Amazon Prime.
Length: 623 pages
"Dostoyevsky's last and greatest novel, The Karamazov Brothers (1880) is both a brilliantly told crime story and a passionate philosophical debate. The dissolute landowner Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov is murdered; his sons - the atheist intellectual Ivan, the hot-blooded Dmitry, and the saintly novice Alyosha - are all at some level involved.

Bound up with this intense family drama is Dostoyevsky's exploration of many deeply felt ideas about the existence of God, the question of human freedom, the collective nature of guilt, the disatrous consequences of rationalism. The novel is also richly comic: the Russian Orthodox Church, the legal system, and even the authors most cherished causes and beliefs are presented with a note of irreverence, so that orthodoxy, and radicalism, sanity and madness, love and hatred, right and wrong are no longer mutually exclusive. Rebecca West considered it "the allegory for the world's maturity", but with children to the fore."
Community Updates

6 Comments