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The Complete Guide to Property Investment: How to survive & thrive in the new world of buy-to-let - Kindle Edition - 99p
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The Complete Guide to Property Investment: How to survive & thrive in the new world of buy-to-let - Kindle Edition - 99p

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Posted 2nd Nov
Been waiting for this to drop for a while great informative book via a very knowledgeable subject matter expert! Kindle edition now just 99p! Print version is a tenner
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Danosaur102/11/2019 11:02

Tory Britain Sorry to get political on here, but "buy to let" really winds …Tory Britain Sorry to get political on here, but "buy to let" really winds me up.What happened to families buying homes to raise their families in.Seems like every house that goes up for sale near me is bought by a landlord.


I bought a house to live in. Lived in it. Had to move for work - tried to sell, but market was not good. Rented it out at below market, but a rate that covered my mortgage (as I had made many over-payments as I planned to live there this was relatively affordable). After 3 years of renting to a single parent family - the tenants stopped paying rent as one of son's turned 18 so her benefits got cut, and she wanted me to evict her so she get free housing. After over year or so - she finally left (took that long as I live 150+ miles away close to where I currently work) and I tried to work with her and council, as profit was not my motivation to tent. Both the council made life difficult (council knew she was playing them, but wanted me to go through the motions). Ultimately I just evicted as I have my own family to look after.

The house sits empty (it secure as it's next door to my parents). I pay the council tax, bill - but it is essentially empty. I'm fortunate, I continually study to improve myself whilst working, and in doing so - increase my wages. I could still sell the house to avoid the costs, but I am looking to move back up north in another year or so - so will move back up.

So - before you get in your high horse and accuse buy-to-let of being a closet Tory policy supporter, and just an evil that "winds" you up - try to figure out what a 'buy to let' is. It's not just people buying house with the intention of renting, it is also people having to change from personal morgages to 'buy to let' as they have changed circumstances and need to rent their homes. It is also bad tenants and councils causing the housing problem (oh, but this is the secret that must not be brought into the light of day).

I was a 'buy to let' landlord. I offered cheap, well maintained, affordable housing only for someone to want exploit the benefits and housing system.

Should I accuse them and anyone supporting what my tenants did as being 'Labour Britain' because they are wanting to fiddle the system? Willing to take benefits - because they are work shy and want to exploit the system? Your stereotyping of the housing problem of being caused by one political party and council is part of the problem these issues of housing and benefit cheating goes on. My house is in a constituency that has been Labour for over 70years. What's its excuse of having a policy that forces, and tries to block landlords from evicting tenant despite the tenant not paying rent for over a year - for no reason other than they want free council house (the tenant deliberately reduced her working hours, despite having more time - as her 18year was an adult, left college and had his own job now) ? Is it that they like to do this more so in times when Tories are in power and it therefore looks bad on a Tory central government?

Oh and if you are wondering how cheap I was offering my former family home as a 'buy to let' - £425 a month, for 3 bedroom house. Market rental value - £600+ a month.
Edited by: "sarb_singh1980" 2nd Nov
Tory Britain
Sorry to get political on here, but "buy to let" really winds me up.
What happened to families buying homes to raise their families in.
Seems like every house that goes up for sale near me is bought by a landlord.
I was just waiting for this to drop to 99p before investing hundreds of thousands of pounds and starting my new property investment mega empire. This deal will make me £squillions£!
41 Comments
Tory Britain
Sorry to get political on here, but "buy to let" really winds me up.
What happened to families buying homes to raise their families in.
Seems like every house that goes up for sale near me is bought by a landlord.
I was just waiting for this to drop to 99p before investing hundreds of thousands of pounds and starting my new property investment mega empire. This deal will make me £squillions£!
Beyond parody.
how up to date is this book?
Obviously the secret is to write a book. Innit.
Danosaur102/11/2019 11:02

Tory Britain Sorry to get political on here, but "buy to let" really winds …Tory Britain Sorry to get political on here, but "buy to let" really winds me up.What happened to families buying homes to raise their families in.Seems like every house that goes up for sale near me is bought by a landlord.


I agree to the above comment but when final salary pension schemes have been withdrawn and years and years of pension pots being ravaged to line shareholders pockets I can understand people looking for alternatives to fund their retirement.

What I do despise is those appearing on TV basically gloating over their "portfolios".
Danosaur102/11/2019 11:02

Tory Britain Sorry to get political on here, but "buy to let" really winds …Tory Britain Sorry to get political on here, but "buy to let" really winds me up.What happened to families buying homes to raise their families in.Seems like every house that goes up for sale near me is bought by a landlord.


I bought a house to live in. Lived in it. Had to move for work - tried to sell, but market was not good. Rented it out at below market, but a rate that covered my mortgage (as I had made many over-payments as I planned to live there this was relatively affordable). After 3 years of renting to a single parent family - the tenants stopped paying rent as one of son's turned 18 so her benefits got cut, and she wanted me to evict her so she get free housing. After over year or so - she finally left (took that long as I live 150+ miles away close to where I currently work) and I tried to work with her and council, as profit was not my motivation to tent. Both the council made life difficult (council knew she was playing them, but wanted me to go through the motions). Ultimately I just evicted as I have my own family to look after.

The house sits empty (it secure as it's next door to my parents). I pay the council tax, bill - but it is essentially empty. I'm fortunate, I continually study to improve myself whilst working, and in doing so - increase my wages. I could still sell the house to avoid the costs, but I am looking to move back up north in another year or so - so will move back up.

So - before you get in your high horse and accuse buy-to-let of being a closet Tory policy supporter, and just an evil that "winds" you up - try to figure out what a 'buy to let' is. It's not just people buying house with the intention of renting, it is also people having to change from personal morgages to 'buy to let' as they have changed circumstances and need to rent their homes. It is also bad tenants and councils causing the housing problem (oh, but this is the secret that must not be brought into the light of day).

I was a 'buy to let' landlord. I offered cheap, well maintained, affordable housing only for someone to want exploit the benefits and housing system.

Should I accuse them and anyone supporting what my tenants did as being 'Labour Britain' because they are wanting to fiddle the system? Willing to take benefits - because they are work shy and want to exploit the system? Your stereotyping of the housing problem of being caused by one political party and council is part of the problem these issues of housing and benefit cheating goes on. My house is in a constituency that has been Labour for over 70years. What's its excuse of having a policy that forces, and tries to block landlords from evicting tenant despite the tenant not paying rent for over a year - for no reason other than they want free council house (the tenant deliberately reduced her working hours, despite having more time - as her 18year was an adult, left college and had his own job now) ? Is it that they like to do this more so in times when Tories are in power and it therefore looks bad on a Tory central government?

Oh and if you are wondering how cheap I was offering my former family home as a 'buy to let' - £425 a month, for 3 bedroom house. Market rental value - £600+ a month.
Edited by: "sarb_singh1980" 2nd Nov
Danosaur102/11/2019 11:02

Tory Britain Sorry to get political on here, but "buy to let" really winds …Tory Britain Sorry to get political on here, but "buy to let" really winds me up.What happened to families buying homes to raise their families in.Seems like every house that goes up for sale near me is bought by a landlord.



Danosaur102/11/2019 11:02

Tory Britain Sorry to get political on here, but "buy to let" really winds …Tory Britain Sorry to get political on here, but "buy to let" really winds me up.What happened to families buying homes to raise their families in.Seems like every house that goes up for sale near me is bought by a landlord.


Labour were in power when the BTL craze really got going 2000-2010 with 100+pc mortgages and the Tory government has introduced two measures in the last few years - the stamp duty surcharge and no being able to offset interest against income - these make BTL very unattractive in many instances
sarb_singh198002/11/2019 13:19

I bought a house to live in. Lived in it. Had to move for work - tried to …I bought a house to live in. Lived in it. Had to move for work - tried to sell, but market was not good. Rented it out at below market, but a rate that covered my mortgage (as I had made many over-payments as I planned to live there this was relatively affordable). After 3 years of renting to a single parent family - the tenants stopped paying rent as one of son's turned 18 so her benefits got cut, and she wanted me to evict her so she get free housing. After over year or so - she finally left (took that long as I live 150+ miles away close to where I currently work) and I tried to work with her and council, as profit was not my motivation to tent. Both the council made life difficult (council knew she was playing them, but wanted me to go through the motions). Ultimately I just evicted as I have my own family to look after. The house sits empty (it secure as it's next door to my parents). I pay the council tax, bill - but it is essentially empty. I'm fortunate, I continually study to improve myself whilst working, and in doing so - increase my wages. I could still sell the house to avoid the costs, but I am looking to move back up north in another year or so - so will move back up.So - before you get in your high horse and accuse buy-to-let of being a closet Tory policy supporter, and just an evil that "winds" you up - try to figure out what a 'buy to let' is. It's not just people buying house with the intention of renting, it is also people having to change from personal morgages to 'buy to let' as they have changed circumstances and need to rent their homes. It is also bad tenants and councils causing the housing problem (oh, but this is the secret that must not be brought into the light of day). I was a 'buy to let' landlord. I offered cheap, well maintained, affordable housing only for someone to want exploit the benefits and housing system. Should I accuse them and anyone supporting what my tenants did as being 'Labour Britain' because they are wanting to fiddle the system? Willing to take benefits - because they are work shy and want to exploit the system? Your stereotyping of the housing problem of being caused by one political party and council is part of the problem these issues of housing and benefit cheating goes on. My house is in a constituency that has been Labour for over 70years. What's its excuse of having a policy that forces, and tries to block landlords from evicting tenant despite the tenant not paying rent for over a year - for no reason other than they want free council house (the tenant deliberately reduced her working hours, despite having more time - as her 18year was an adult, left college and had his own job now) ? Is it that they like to do this more so in times when Tories are in power and it therefore looks bad on a Tory central government?Oh and if you are wondering how cheap I was offering my former family home as a 'buy to let' - £425 a month, for 3 bedroom house. Market rental value - £600+ a month.


There are many issues which I couldn't cover in my brief rant.
My gripe is with the whole system. I'm past all that now, but I'm from the time when families bought their homes and enjoyed normal working lives that fitted around their families.
There was no such thing as working poor. If you had a job you had a decent life.
I do get on my high horse, but I cannot give sympathy to any landlord who has a hard time with tenants. It is the nature of the game and should be factored into the business/investment.
mgk02/11/2019 13:57

Labour were in power when the BTL craze really got going 2000-2010 with …Labour were in power when the BTL craze really got going 2000-2010 with 100+pc mortgages and the Tory government has introduced two measures in the last few years - the stamp duty surcharge and no being able to offset interest against income - these make BTL very unattractive in many instances


Indeed. The ability to offset interest against mortgage is a big reason many accidental or single property bland lord's are leaving the rental market - thus cause house rental prices to increase. Those big portfolio home owners tend to be set up as companies, so still can off set their mortgage interest and costs as expenses, and only pay tax on dividends taken. Most will not take dividends but will reinvest in more houses - reducing supply more. They will also benefit from increased rent by reduced housing stock.

And you are correct, Labour and T.B. have a lot to answer - add their loose fiscal policy and 'liberalisation' of finances for their friends to the long list how they messed up the country.

Does not matter which political party gets in power - they are are all in it for their short term political benefit, at the expenses of the people's immediate, medium and long term cost.
Edited by: "sarb_singh1980" 2nd Nov
Danosaur102/11/2019 14:05

There are many issues which I couldn't cover in my brief rant.My gripe is …There are many issues which I couldn't cover in my brief rant.My gripe is with the whole system. I'm past all that now, but I'm from the time when families bought their homes and enjoyed normal working lives that fitted around their families.There was no such thing as working poor. If you had a job you had a decent life.I do get on my high horse, but I cannot give sympathy to any landlord who has a hard time with tenants. It is the nature of the game and should be factored into the business/investment.


"I cannot give any sympathy to any landlord who has a hard time with tenants.... It should be factored into the business/investment" ... Sums up why I'd rather keep an empty house then rent it out. The risk of bad tenant was factored in as was the existing policies. What was not factored in was how despite it being the tenants fault - the land lord is seen at being at fault for trying the keep and 'investment' (actually it was a family home in was hoping to keep hold of and not be forced to sell). Also what was not factored in that council being the ones breaking not just the law, but also the spirit of the law (and when found out not having any punishment allocated to them).

Now that the stupidity and unfairness of the system is evident, and the policies become even more punishing - people like me leave the market. Making the problem you moan about get worse. But unlike you - I still have the ability to feel sympathy for the genuinely homeless and those needing help (I just won't be the one offering the help - your views reinforced I was right to take the property off the market).
Edited by: "sarb_singh1980" 2nd Nov
sarb_singh198002/11/2019 14:31

"I cannot give any sympathy to any landlord who has a hard time with …"I cannot give any sympathy to any landlord who has a hard time with tenants.... It should be factored into the business/investment" ... Sums up why I'd rather keep an empty house then rent it out. The risk of bad tenant was factored in as was the existing policies. What was not factored in was how despite it being the tenants fault - the land lord is seen at being at fault for trying the keep and 'investment' (actually it was a family home in was hoping to keep hold of and not be forced to sell). Also what was not factored in that council being the ones breaking not just the law, but also the spirit of the law (and when found out not having any punishment allocated to them).Now that the stupidity and unfairness of the system is evident, and the policies become even more punishing - people like me leave the market. Making the problem you moan about get worse. But unlike you - I still have the ability to feel sympathy for the genuinely homeless and those needing help (I just won't be the one offering the help - your views reinforced I was right to take the property off the market).


That's not quite how the market works though. If it wasn't for these "investments", houses would be much more affordable.
You basically agree that family homes are important. These days families don't get to own their own homes and are at the mercy of the landlord to where they can call home.
Danosaur102/11/2019 14:05

There are many issues which I couldn't cover in my brief rant.My gripe is …There are many issues which I couldn't cover in my brief rant.My gripe is with the whole system. I'm past all that now, but I'm from the time when families bought their homes and enjoyed normal working lives that fitted around their families.There was no such thing as working poor. If you had a job you had a decent life.I do get on my high horse, but I cannot give sympathy to any landlord who has a hard time with tenants. It is the nature of the game and should be factored into the business/investment.


But like the time before you many people rented houses. Both sets of my grandparents brought up my parents in a rented council house. Many factory workers lived in rented accommodation owned by their company.
Renting was the norm, owning was the exception.

Besides some people aren't in the position to rent irrespective of house prices, or they simply like renting and not have to worry about house maintenance and are free to move when they like.

Round my way those pesky people have been snapping up houses for 'buy to let'. The worst thing is the council are spending my money to do it!
Wow full on this thread, least the books only a quid ey
GAVINLEWISHUKD02/11/2019 14:58

But like the time before you many people rented houses. Both sets of my …But like the time before you many people rented houses. Both sets of my grandparents brought up my parents in a rented council house. Many factory workers lived in rented accommodation owned by their company.Renting was the norm, owning was the exception.Besides some people aren't in the position to rent irrespective of house prices, or they simply like renting and not have to worry about house maintenance and are free to move when they like.Round my way those pesky people have been snapping up houses for 'buy to let'. The worst thing is the council are spending my money to do it!


Council houses these days are like gold dust.
But government don't have to build council houses anymore. The BTL system removes that cost from them.
I disagree with "renting was the norm". If you rented, it would have been on a council estate.
Danosaur102/11/2019 14:58

That's not quite how the market works though. If it wasn't for these …That's not quite how the market works though. If it wasn't for these "investments", houses would be much more affordable.You basically agree that family homes are important. These days families don't get to own their own homes and are at the mercy of the landlord to where they can call home.


That is how the market works. Population increases, housing stock does not keep up. Causing house prices rise. Peoples wages do not rise as fast as house prices, so they cannot afford houses to buy, so need to rent. Only those with the ability to buy houses (higher wages) can buy them for themselves or others as rental stick. But, if no one - according to your world view - should own houses, how is anyone meant to find properties to rent?

There is not enough houses for everyone to own one - even if all rental property (including HMOs) were sold*? What would you do in that instance? You cannot just create these houses overnight - so what do you do in the meantime whist these are being built? Bear in mind - the number houses needing to built needs to continually increase as population bus increasing.

*But I am presuming you think there are enough housing if you force every to sell? This would push down house prices, just what you want. It would make many elderly people and pension companies bankrupt also - as they invest in companies that are in the corporate rental market.

For you - everything is black and white. Anyone that is a landlord is in the wrong. All families are nuclear (mum & dad and kids). Their are no homeless individuals needing just a room (in HMO''s) - they should have whole homes to themselves. No single pensioners wanting to downsize or move in to nursing homes or shared elderly communities (also - type of buy-to-let business). For you generations of families should all live together like the Walton's - never moving out or moving away from where they born. God forbid, some actually prefers to rent, as opposed to buying! Should every who visits the UK for temporary work just live in hotels or be forced to buy a house? Are hotels allowed to exist in your world view?

I disagree with what you think of "how the market works" - I believe my understanding of how the markets works is better than yours. You may have read the theory and propaganda, I have lived and experienced the reality. My world view of life is based on what it is, and what i see and experience. From what I read of yours - it is based on a fantasy, where all landlords are parasites.
Edited by: "sarb_singh1980" 2nd Nov
Danosaur102/11/2019 15:14

Council houses these days are like gold dust.But government don't have to …Council houses these days are like gold dust.But government don't have to build council houses anymore. The BTL system removes that cost from them.I disagree with "renting was the norm". If you rented, it would have been on a council estate.


I'm sorry the rental stats are not to your liking.

Post WW2 up until the 1960's home ownership for the UK ran at about a ⅓ of housing stock.

I guess if you lived in the home countries home ownership was probably significantly higher than if you lived in the North West.
GAVINLEWISHUKD02/11/2019 15:27

I'm sorry the rental stats are not to your liking. Post WW2 …I'm sorry the rental stats are not to your liking. Post WW2 up until the 1960's home ownership for the UK ran at about a ⅓ of housing stock.I guess if you lived in the home countries home ownership was probably significantly higher than if you lived in the North West.


1960's you say! I was born then so don't need to look at stats lol.
I'm not a historian. I am going by what I saw.
But I would guess that we were still feeling the effects of WW2 before the home owning boom started.
sarb_singh198002/11/2019 15:24

That is how the market works. Population increases, housing stock does not …That is how the market works. Population increases, housing stock does not keep up. Causing house prices rise. Peoples wages do not rise as fast as house prices, so they cannot afford houses to buy, so need to rent. Only those with the ability to buy houses (higher wages) can buy them for themselves or others as rental stick. But, if no one - according to your world view - should own houses, how is anyone meant to find properties to rent? There is not enough houses for everyone to own one - even if all rental property (including HMOs) were sold*? What would you do in that instance? You cannot just create these houses overnight - so what do you do in the meantime whist these are being built? Bear in mind - the number houses needing to built needs to continually increase as population bus increasing. *But I am presuming you think there are enough housing if you force every to sell? This would push down house prices, just what you want. It would make many elderly people and pension companies bankrupt also - as they invest in companies that are in the corporate rental market. For you - everything is black and white. Anyone that is a landlord is in the wrong. All families are nuclear (mum & dad and kids). Their are no homeless individuals needing just a room (in HMO''s) - they should have whole homes to themselves. No single pensioners wanting to downsize or move in to nursing homes or shared elderly communities (also - type of buy-to-let business). For you generations of families should all live together like the Walton's - never moving out or moving away from where they born. God forbid, some actually prefers to rent, as opposed to buying! Should every who visits the UK for temporary work just live in hotels or be forced to buy a house? Are hotels allowed to exist in your world view? I disagree with what you think of "how the market works" - I believe my understanding of how the markets works is better than yours. You may have read the theory and propaganda, I have lived and experienced the reality. My world view of life is based on what it is, and what i see and experience. From what I read of yours - it is based on a fantasy, where all landlords are parasites.


You really shouldn't tell people how great you are.
Danosaur102/11/2019 15:39

You really shouldn't tell people how great you are.


I'm not. I'm just holding up a mirror to you - so you can look at yourself and challenge you blinkered world view.

What's the matter - never stepped outside of your own tiny world and been challenged to examine your beliefs before? I'm not telling people how great I am, what I am doing is putting you down based on your beliefs and understanding of free market economics as well as your politic beliefs - that all land lord's are bad, and the they all don't offer a service and that they deserve no respect or any sympathy when they are ill treated.
Edited by: "sarb_singh1980" 2nd Nov
Danosaur102/11/2019 15:32

1960's you say! I was born then so don't need to look at stats lol.I'm not …1960's you say! I was born then so don't need to look at stats lol.I'm not a historian. I am going by what I saw.But I would guess that we were still feeling the effects of WW2 before the home owning boom started.


Well if you were born in the 1960's it's likely the first you will have taken interest in the housing market was the early 1980's when 'right to buy' was all over the news.

Maybe you didn't notice people renting because there was no internet for them to moan about it on.

Who knows, but facts are facts.

So what's your take on council's buying up housing? For example Leicester city council have spent about £17m this year buying housing to rent out.
sarb_singh198002/11/2019 15:41

I'm not. I'm just holding up a mirror to you - so you can look at … I'm not. I'm just holding up a mirror to you - so you can look at yourself and challenge you blinkered world view.What's the matter - never stepped outside of your own tiny world and been challenged to examine your beliefs before? I'm not telling people how great I am, what I am doing is putting you down based on your beliefs and understanding of free market economics as well as your politic beliefs - that all land lord's are bad, and the they all don't offer a service and that they deserve no respect or any sympathy when they are ill treated.


I'm not saying ALL landlords are parasites.
Some have wandered into that sphere to subsidise pensions.
I actually do feel some sympathy for these people as they have got themselves into something that can be quite painful.
It is a business and should be treated as such.
Danosaur102/11/2019 15:53

I'm not saying ALL landlords are parasites.Some have wandered into that …I'm not saying ALL landlords are parasites.Some have wandered into that sphere to subsidise pensions. I actually do feel some sympathy for these people as they have got themselves into something that can be quite painful.It is a business and should be treated as such.


Re-read you comments - what they say and what they imply.

38885657.jpg
If you have changed you mind, say so clearly. From what I have read - you categorically state you have no sympathy for any landlords, even those badly treated - any bad treatmeant they suffer is justified as a cost of doing business (something that should be factored in as business costs). You almost sound like a what you appear to despise - a Tory!

If you have changed your mind - say so - say "I've changed my mind". Don't imply this new found sympathy in your last post was your belief all along, as the written evidence from earlier posts show this to be lies. You categorically state you "cannot give any sympathy to any landlord" - despite reading my example of poor treatment by tenant and council.

People like you, from my perspective are part of the cause of the housing crisis. You let your blinkered thinking stop those with good intentions from helping other people because you want any solution to be your idea and done your way. You attack those with good intentions at every opportunity, loudly and indiscriminately - you do it so often people just don't bother to help or stop helping and solving the problems. Yet you yourself I suspect will never actually do anything to help solve the problems.
Edited by: "sarb_singh1980" 2nd Nov
sarb_singh198002/11/2019 13:19

I bought a house to live in. Lived in it. Had to move for work - tried to …I bought a house to live in. Lived in it. Had to move for work - tried to sell, but market was not good. Rented it out at below market, but a rate that covered my mortgage (as I had made many over-payments as I planned to live there this was relatively affordable). After 3 years of renting to a single parent family - the tenants stopped paying rent as one of son's turned 18 so her benefits got cut, and she wanted me to evict her so she get free housing. After over year or so - she finally left (took that long as I live 150+ miles away close to where I currently work) and I tried to work with her and council, as profit was not my motivation to tent. Both the council made life difficult (council knew she was playing them, but wanted me to go through the motions). Ultimately I just evicted as I have my own family to look after. The house sits empty (it secure as it's next door to my parents). I pay the council tax, bill - but it is essentially empty. I'm fortunate, I continually study to improve myself whilst working, and in doing so - increase my wages. I could still sell the house to avoid the costs, but I am looking to move back up north in another year or so - so will move back up.So - before you get in your high horse and accuse buy-to-let of being a closet Tory policy supporter, and just an evil that "winds" you up - try to figure out what a 'buy to let' is. It's not just people buying house with the intention of renting, it is also people having to change from personal morgages to 'buy to let' as they have changed circumstances and need to rent their homes. It is also bad tenants and councils causing the housing problem (oh, but this is the secret that must not be brought into the light of day). I was a 'buy to let' landlord. I offered cheap, well maintained, affordable housing only for someone to want exploit the benefits and housing system. Should I accuse them and anyone supporting what my tenants did as being 'Labour Britain' because they are wanting to fiddle the system? Willing to take benefits - because they are work shy and want to exploit the system? Your stereotyping of the housing problem of being caused by one political party and council is part of the problem these issues of housing and benefit cheating goes on. My house is in a constituency that has been Labour for over 70years. What's its excuse of having a policy that forces, and tries to block landlords from evicting tenant despite the tenant not paying rent for over a year - for no reason other than they want free council house (the tenant deliberately reduced her working hours, despite having more time - as her 18year was an adult, left college and had his own job now) ? Is it that they like to do this more so in times when Tories are in power and it therefore looks bad on a Tory central government?Oh and if you are wondering how cheap I was offering my former family home as a 'buy to let' - £425 a month, for 3 bedroom house. Market rental value - £600+ a month.


U are a good man, sorry for your misfortune with these horrible manipulative tenants
sarb_singh198002/11/2019 13:19

I bought a house to live in. Lived in it. Had to move for work - tried to …I bought a house to live in. Lived in it. Had to move for work - tried to sell, but market was not good. Rented it out at below market, but a rate that covered my mortgage (as I had made many over-payments as I planned to live there this was relatively affordable). After 3 years of renting to a single parent family - the tenants stopped paying rent as one of son's turned 18 so her benefits got cut, and she wanted me to evict her so she get free housing. After over year or so - she finally left (took that long as I live 150+ miles away close to where I currently work) and I tried to work with her and council, as profit was not my motivation to tent. Both the council made life difficult (council knew she was playing them, but wanted me to go through the motions). Ultimately I just evicted as I have my own family to look after. The house sits empty (it secure as it's next door to my parents). I pay the council tax, bill - but it is essentially empty. I'm fortunate, I continually study to improve myself whilst working, and in doing so - increase my wages. I could still sell the house to avoid the costs, but I am looking to move back up north in another year or so - so will move back up.So - before you get in your high horse and accuse buy-to-let of being a closet Tory policy supporter, and just an evil that "winds" you up - try to figure out what a 'buy to let' is. It's not just people buying house with the intention of renting, it is also people having to change from personal morgages to 'buy to let' as they have changed circumstances and need to rent their homes. It is also bad tenants and councils causing the housing problem (oh, but this is the secret that must not be brought into the light of day). I was a 'buy to let' landlord. I offered cheap, well maintained, affordable housing only for someone to want exploit the benefits and housing system. Should I accuse them and anyone supporting what my tenants did as being 'Labour Britain' because they are wanting to fiddle the system? Willing to take benefits - because they are work shy and want to exploit the system? Your stereotyping of the housing problem of being caused by one political party and council is part of the problem these issues of housing and benefit cheating goes on. My house is in a constituency that has been Labour for over 70years. What's its excuse of having a policy that forces, and tries to block landlords from evicting tenant despite the tenant not paying rent for over a year - for no reason other than they want free council house (the tenant deliberately reduced her working hours, despite having more time - as her 18year was an adult, left college and had his own job now) ? Is it that they like to do this more so in times when Tories are in power and it therefore looks bad on a Tory central government?Oh and if you are wondering how cheap I was offering my former family home as a 'buy to let' - £425 a month, for 3 bedroom house. Market rental value - £600+ a month.


Excellent response that demonstrates a real scenario that doesn't depict a money grabbing landlord. Thanks for sharing this, I just hope you didn't type all of that from your phone
mgk02/11/2019 13:57

Labour were in power when the BTL craze really got going 2000-2010 with …Labour were in power when the BTL craze really got going 2000-2010 with 100+pc mortgages and the Tory government has introduced two measures in the last few years - the stamp duty surcharge and no being able to offset interest against income - these make BTL very unattractive in many instances


Totally correct. Although my faith that George Osbourne's good deeds will not be trashed by another T*** government is not high. I also believe that the willingness of banks to lend any amount of money especially when people were able to self declare their own fairytale-income are main reason the housing market is in it's current state. Portfolio, 100%, BTL landlords have been allowed to exploit the market for too long, effectively betting with borrowed money on an addicts conviction that housing stock unlike any other commodity can only possibly appreciate in value. If banks were responsible lenders and lent an affordable 3x income, we would not need 6x income loans to buy previously affordable homes to live in. The immediate effect would be that prices fall if they lend responsibly. The only people who ever seem to win are those who steal, lie and cheat their way in every walk of life. Capital Gain their @$$€$ and regulate the market.
sarb_singh198002/11/2019 15:24

That is how the market works. Population increases, housing stock does not …That is how the market works. Population increases, housing stock does not keep up. Causing house prices rise. Peoples wages do not rise as fast as house prices, so they cannot afford houses to buy, so need to rent. Only those with the ability to buy houses (higher wages) can buy them for themselves or others as rental stick. But, if no one - according to your world view - should own houses, how is anyone meant to find properties to rent? There is not enough houses for everyone to own one - even if all rental property (including HMOs) were sold*? What would you do in that instance? You cannot just create these houses overnight - so what do you do in the meantime whist these are being built? Bear in mind - the number houses needing to built needs to continually increase as population bus increasing. *But I am presuming you think there are enough housing if you force every to sell? This would push down house prices, just what you want. It would make many elderly people and pension companies bankrupt also - as they invest in companies that are in the corporate rental market. For you - everything is black and white. Anyone that is a landlord is in the wrong. All families are nuclear (mum & dad and kids). Their are no homeless individuals needing just a room (in HMO''s) - they should have whole homes to themselves. No single pensioners wanting to downsize or move in to nursing homes or shared elderly communities (also - type of buy-to-let business). For you generations of families should all live together like the Walton's - never moving out or moving away from where they born. God forbid, some actually prefers to rent, as opposed to buying! Should every who visits the UK for temporary work just live in hotels or be forced to buy a house? Are hotels allowed to exist in your world view? I disagree with what you think of "how the market works" - I believe my understanding of how the markets works is better than yours. You may have read the theory and propaganda, I have lived and experienced the reality. My world view of life is based on what it is, and what i see and experience. From what I read of yours - it is based on a fantasy, where all landlords are parasites.


We do not have/have not had exponential population growth. Population is a small factor behind the exponential growth in the cost of housing since the 1970s. The supply of money created by banks on the other hand is. So is the hyperthetical incomes people have been able to selfdeclare.
This book is like desperate Charles Ponzi's attempting to push his dodgy scheme on to a few more fools.
Genuine question, I don't know the answer. Assume you rent a private house until you retire. When you retire you no longer have an income, what generally happens then?
Many Tories on this thread moaning about their tenants, must be so hard for them with their multiple properties, whilst those of us up north can only dream about having a mortgage, let alone multiple properties.
It's hard once you've got a family, but if you're just starting out:
- Get a credit card and pay it off fully every month, this builds up a credit rating
- Live with parents or rent a room in a shared house in a naff area
- Don't buy a car, have holidays, netflix, gamble, etc
- Buy the cheapest flat in a crap area with a 100% mortgage (they still exist).
- As long as it's structurally sound don't worry about decor

Wait 5->10 years, inflation will reduce your mortgage every year. After that you should be able to move to somewhere nice

Obviously this assumes self control so do not consider this unless you have it! Especially with the 100% mortgage, that's what screwed up a lot of people before the big financial crisis of 2010'ish
friar_chris08/11/2019 18:32

We do not have/have not had exponential population growth. Population is a …We do not have/have not had exponential population growth. Population is a small factor behind the exponential growth in the cost of housing since the 1970s. The supply of money created by banks on the other hand is. So is the hyperthetical incomes people have been able to selfdeclare.


It not say we had exponential growth. I said populations grow (or words to that effect). Also the total growth is not equally divided throughout the country - it is more concentrated in certain areas/cities - which already have higher density - largely drawn by the attractions of the jobs market and attributed infrastructure being bigger* then less populous areas. *Bigger does not always equate to better, or more efficient, or better resourced. So whilst in a national/macro level population growth in statistics terms as a percentage is not necessarily large or unmanageable, on a local level already high density populous areas suffer from lack of supply as new houses that are affordable are not built at a fast enough speed. Hence the price increase - supply and demand. London is more expensive for property than Middlesbrough - London has greater population, but more importantly it has a higher population density putting greater demand on existing housing stock, and it also has less space for new homes. Additionally, in terms of actual numbers, London sees more population growth (by UK births and immigration) then for example Middlesbrough. For this reason, among others, London has higher house prices.

The supply of money is a major factor that is underappreciated, and does impact people's purchasing power. It's the opposite side of supply/demand coin to property. There is a over supply of fiat/currency* they means the value is reduced. Which in turn means you need more fist to buy the same thing you did previously. *Backed by nothing ever since the US Dollar came off the gold standard - all word currencies are pegged to the USD which is pegged to nothing. With banks and central banks being able to print money out of thin air and having to have ever small reserves against this money leveraged (the fractional reserve system).

I could go on - but the post is about a book on offer.
Dakota77708/11/2019 18:16

Excellent response that demonstrates a real scenario that doesn't depict a …Excellent response that demonstrates a real scenario that doesn't depict a money grabbing landlord. Thanks for sharing this, I just hope you didn't type all of that from your phone


Thanks. Appreciate the support. And yes, all from the phone unfortunately - hardly get the chance to get in the laptop unless it's to do with actual work related stuff.
Landlords are parasites.
Cheap borrowing and lack of supply will always create inflation of house prices. In todays modern economy people tend to move more often so renting can be a good thing for some, providing the property is in good condition and the rent is fair.

The truth is that today is one of the worst times ever to buy a house in relation to earnings. I explained this to my sister and at first she wasn't having any of it. She purchased in 1997 which was a prime sweet spot.

"In 1997, the average house price was roughly two-and-a-half times the average income for people in their mid-to-late 20s - similar to 1968. But you would have been so much richer in 1997 than you would have been in the late 1960s,” says Jonathan. “And the standard of homes was better - you’d be more likely to have central heating or double glazing.”

After reading that she agreed she was lucky.

The next time someone tells you they had it bad ask them what year they purchased their property and then have a look at this.

bbc.co.uk/new…ine

Heat for the ebook
deal.finder.org08/11/2019 18:08

U are a good man, sorry for your misfortune with these horrible …U are a good man, sorry for your misfortune with these horrible manipulative tenants


Thank you. I appreciate it. It's life unfortunately. But it is just getting harder and harder for people in my situation. Made so by not just bad tenants, but also bad councils, and governments looking to exploit you as cash cow (when really the vast majority are not making huge profits, just enough to cover a mortgage, or support a pension).

I'm at the point where I am thinking just selling my family. Hopefully it will be brought by a family, but likely it will be brought by a professional housing company - who may or may not be good for the tenants. What they will be able to do either way is to pay less tax, as they will likely take out money from the company, and they will have more legal resources to challenge councils and carry out faster evictions (be they for bad tenants or good tenant who they want to replace with higher paying tenants). Either sell or keep it empty. For now, I've lost trust in tenants and councils. If I do return, it will be having sold my family to my own company created for this sole purpose. And I guess this is how many people feel, and have felt in the past. And so the cycle continues.
Edited by: "sarb_singh1980" 8th Nov
Shard08/11/2019 18:56

It's hard once you've got a family, but if you're just starting out:- Get …It's hard once you've got a family, but if you're just starting out:- Get a credit card and pay it off fully every month, this builds up a credit rating- Live with parents or rent a room in a shared house in a naff area- Don't buy a car, have holidays, netflix, gamble, etc- Buy the cheapest flat in a crap area with a 100% mortgage (they still exist). - As long as it's structurally sound don't worry about decorWait 5->10 years, inflation will reduce your mortgage every year. After that you should be able to move to somewhere niceObviously this assumes self control so do not consider this unless you have it! Especially with the 100% mortgage, that's what screwed up a lot of people before the big financial crisis of 2010'ish


Exactly. A lot of sacrifice goes into improving ones lot (particularly if you are starting from a less advantaged point*). Even then, it could not work every time. But the point is to keep getting back up and trying. Keep improving yourself (never let education stop at school at school, college, uni - keep learning your whole life), and finding ways to push yourself forward.
*Poorer family start, living in a deprived area, poorer education, less opportunities in local area.
sfsorrow08/11/2019 19:15

Landlords are parasites.


Such a well thought out, nuianced and enlightend comment. Your world view is so refreshing. If offers the solution to the whole housing problem and general world problems in one sentence. Have you ever thought of running for a political party?

Let me try following in your footsteps and describe you in one sentence. Here goes...

Muppet

Did it in one word.
Smeeble08/11/2019 18:45

Many Tories on this thread moaning about their tenants, must be so hard …Many Tories on this thread moaning about their tenants, must be so hard for them with their multiple properties, whilst those of us up north can only dream about having a mortgage, let alone multiple properties.


I've read every post here - I can't see anyone have said they are Tory, or anyone who has said they own more than one property (let alone rents out more than one property). Must have missed it.

Can you quote one person who has written they are Tory? Can you quote one person who has said they have multiple properties?

As without quoting - you at best making uncollaboratee assumptions.

As for no one from up North being able to get a, or dream of getting a mortgage - well that's a blatant lie. I for one am from up North, as are my family, most if friends and neighbours - pretty much all have mortgages. The age range of those that have morgages I would say is between 22 and 60.
Edited by: "sarb_singh1980" 8th Nov
sarb_singh198008/11/2019 19:53

Such a well thought out, nuianced and enlightend comment. Your world view …Such a well thought out, nuianced and enlightend comment. Your world view is so refreshing. If offers the solution to the whole housing problem and general world problems in one sentence. Have you ever thought of running for a political party? Let me try following in your footsteps and describe you in one sentence. Here goes...MuppetDid it in one word.


You know what you are.
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