The Great 78 Project - 63.000 digitized classic records for free
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The Great 78 Project - 63.000 digitized classic records for free

29
Found 12th Apr
There you find records that you won't find at any other music service. Have fun.


The Great 78 Project is a community project for the preservation, research and discovery

of 78rpm records. From about 1898 to the 1950s, an estimated 3 million

sides (~3 minute recordings) have been made on 78rpm discs. While the

commercially viable recordings will have been restored or remastered

onto LP’s or CD, there is still research value in the artifacts and

usage evidence in the often rare 78rpm discs and recordings. Already,

over 20 collections have been selected by the Internet Archive for physical and digital preservation and access. Started by many volunteer collectors, these new collections have been selected, digitized and preserved by the Internet Archive, George Blood LP, and the Archive of Contemporary Music.



We aim to bring to light the decisions by music collectors over the

decades and a digital reference collection of underrepresented artists

and genres. The digitization will make this less commonly available

music accessible to researchers in a format where it can be manipulated

and studied without harming the physical artifacts. We have preserved

the often very prominent surface noise and imperfections and included

files generated by different sizes and shapes of stylus to facilitate

different kinds of analysis.



78s were mostly made from shellac, i.e., beetle resin, and were the

brittle predecessors to the LP (microgroove) era. The format is

obsolete, and just picking them up can cause them to break apart in your

hands. There’s no way to predict if the digital versions of these 78s

will outlast the physical items, so we are preserving both to ensure the

survival of these cultural materials for future generations to study

and enjoy.



Please join this project to:


  • Share knowledge. Help improve the metadata, curate the collection, contact collectors, do research on the corpus, etc.
  • Include your digitized collection. If you have already digitized 78s or related books or media, we’d like to include your work in the collection.
  • Digitize your collection. We’ve worked hard to make digitization safe, fast and affordable, so if you’d like to digitize your collection we can help.
  • Donate 78s. We have 200,000 78s, but we are always

    looking for more. We will digitize your collection and preserve the

    physical discs for the long term.
Community Updates
The Internet Archive co-founder (who also happened to have been a member of the Grateful Dead) died about a week ago. There is a video which talks about him and the work of the Internet Archive at

archive.org/det…_Sc

It is over four hours long
Internet Archive Deals

Groups

Top comments
Crispy_Ambulance12th Apr

Can anyone explain this statement :"There’s no way to predict if the d …Can anyone explain this statement :"There’s no way to predict if the digital versions of these 78s will outlast the physical items"


It is referring to the fact that many digital formats become obsolete as technology moves on. There are millions of files on floppy discs, tapes and other media that are essentially lost because nobody has the equipment or software to read them any more. If nobody bothers to convert things then they will get lost to time.

Imagine for a moment you are clearing out a relatives house, and you find a box of photos. Chances are some of those photos will be kept and passed on but what about a knackered old computer that you don't have the password for, in all likelihood that is going to be dumped without a second thought along with all the photo files.

Today we find old scrolls or engravings from thousands of years ago and are able to read them, a thousand years from now if someone finds a USB drive, will it work, and even if it does will anyone be able to read it?
Anyone interested in the (pre)history of music should follow Centuries of Sound who do monthly mixes for each year, they're up to 1901. They're fascinating windows into the past.
Edited by: "unterwasser" 14th Apr
29 Comments
Well found
Good reminder .
Anyone interested in the (pre)history of music should follow Centuries of Sound who do monthly mixes for each year, they're up to 1901. They're fascinating windows into the past.
Edited by: "unterwasser" 14th Apr
Can anyone explain this statement :

"There’s no way to predict if the digital versions of these 78s

will outlast the physical items"
Crispy_Ambulance12th Apr

Can anyone explain this statement :"There’s no way to predict if the d …Can anyone explain this statement :"There’s no way to predict if the digital versions of these 78s will outlast the physical items"


I imagine it means that if the hard copies are stored securely indefinitely, and so are the digital copies, it's impossible to tell which will last longest. The digital apocalypse seems unlikely, but is not out of the question.
Heat added.
There are some earlier (and possibly original) versions of modern songs.
....and it's the F-word (free).
Thanks for the heads up
Crispy_Ambulance12th Apr

Can anyone explain this statement :"There’s no way to predict if the d …Can anyone explain this statement :"There’s no way to predict if the digital versions of these 78s will outlast the physical items"


It is referring to the fact that many digital formats become obsolete as technology moves on. There are millions of files on floppy discs, tapes and other media that are essentially lost because nobody has the equipment or software to read them any more. If nobody bothers to convert things then they will get lost to time.

Imagine for a moment you are clearing out a relatives house, and you find a box of photos. Chances are some of those photos will be kept and passed on but what about a knackered old computer that you don't have the password for, in all likelihood that is going to be dumped without a second thought along with all the photo files.

Today we find old scrolls or engravings from thousands of years ago and are able to read them, a thousand years from now if someone finds a USB drive, will it work, and even if it does will anyone be able to read it?
Love that when I went on the site it immediately suggested Glen miller blueberry hill! Loved that tune as a kid. Got loads of 78s inherited from my great grandad need to cross check them on the site.
Is there a "Great 33 1/3 Project"?
Crispy_Ambulance12th Apr

Can anyone explain this statement :"There’s no way to predict if the d …Can anyone explain this statement :"There’s no way to predict if the digital versions of these 78s will outlast the physical items"



Further to previous replies, it also also unknown how long digital storage media will physically last before molecular degradation/decomposition occurs. It is accepted that optical media (CD, DVD etc) disintegrate with time, and it is very likely that magnetic media (hard drives/tapes) and silicon substrates (so-called 'solid state drives') will also physically deteriorate with time, rendering the stored data corrupted and unrecoverable.
Going_Digital1 h, 2 m ago

It is referring to the fact that many digital formats become obsolete as …It is referring to the fact that many digital formats become obsolete as technology moves on. There are millions of files on floppy discs, tapes and other media that are essentially lost because nobody has the equipment or software to read them any more. If nobody bothers to convert things then they will get lost to time.Imagine for a moment you are clearing out a relatives house, and you find a box of photos. Chances are some of those photos will be kept and passed on but what about a knackered old computer that you don't have the password for, in all likelihood that is going to be dumped without a second thought along with all the photo files.Today we find old scrolls or engravings from thousands of years ago and are able to read them, a thousand years from now if someone finds a USB drive, will it work, and even if it does will anyone be able to read it?


But digital data is just 1's and 0's, it will be easier to convert to the new technology than converting hieroglyphics into english? plus this stuff is unlikely to get lost and turn up in a cave?
Crispy_Ambulance12th Apr

But digital data is just 1's and 0's, it will be easier to convert to the …But digital data is just 1's and 0's, it will be easier to convert to the new technology than converting hieroglyphics into english? plus this stuff is unlikely to get lost and turn up in a cave?


As long as someone takes the trouble of moving those 0s & 1s onto successive storage formats that can be plugged into a contemporary Pcs. Take your papyrus to someone at a university and they can have a look at it. Take them info on an 8 Track cassette and they can't!
I will be revisiting. Many Thanks
Only 63 of them?
Cant wait to start sampling some of this
Not much interest to me but I think my F-I-L is going to love it.
Well done OP, will spend many hours reminiscing!
Thanks
Excellent find, well done. Classics , listening to 'Praise the Lord and pass the Ammunition!
Going_Digital18 h, 4 m ago

It is referring to the fact that many digital formats become obsolete as …It is referring to the fact that many digital formats become obsolete as technology moves on. There are millions of files on floppy discs, tapes and other media that are essentially lost because nobody has the equipment or software to read them any more. If nobody bothers to convert things then they will get lost to time.Imagine for a moment you are clearing out a relatives house, and you find a box of photos. Chances are some of those photos will be kept and passed on but what about a knackered old computer that you don't have the password for, in all likelihood that is going to be dumped without a second thought along with all the photo files.Today we find old scrolls or engravings from thousands of years ago and are able to read them, a thousand years from now if someone finds a USB drive, will it work, and even if it does will anyone be able to read it?


VHS is an example where it's already happening...
Wow!

Bloody fantastic and a find that adds true quality to peoples lives.

Well done and thank you Buckyball.
Edited by: "homebanjo" 13th Apr
Great Stuff. Great Heat. Many thanks Buckyball (OP).
Absolutely brilliant! A great find. Many thanks.
Loving this site. Listening to all my favourite beatles tracks. Will leave a donation. Thank you
johnnystorm12 h, 41 m ago

As long as someone takes the trouble of moving those 0s & 1s onto …As long as someone takes the trouble of moving those 0s & 1s onto successive storage formats that can be plugged into a contemporary Pcs. Take your papyrus to someone at a university and they can have a look at it. Take them info on an 8 Track cassette and they can't!


Well that's my point.
ivormel13th Apr

Absolutely brilliant! A great find. Many thanks.


brilliant great sight
Crispy_Ambulance12th Apr

But digital data is just 1's and 0's, it will be easier to convert to the …But digital data is just 1's and 0's, it will be easier to convert to the new technology than converting hieroglyphics into english? plus this stuff is unlikely to get lost and turn up in a cave?


The 1s and 0s are in very specific formats though.

A USB drive will probably be in FAT32 format today but 15 years ago would've been FAT16. Ten years before that, probably some other format. I can't even remember the drive format my Amiga used 20 years ago.

Then there's the file formats themselves. It was MP3 for years but now it's mostly AAC. Then again, an official audio archive might use a lossless format like FLAC.

Ten years from now all of this will probably have changed again, and being stored on fragile media only makes the job harder.

Keeping track of digital stuff is much more complex than the old physical media.

The work the Internet Archive is doing goes mostly unnoticed, but only increases in value as the years plod on.
Going_Digital12th Apr

It is referring to the fact that many digital formats become obsolete as …It is referring to the fact that many digital formats become obsolete as technology moves on. There are millions of files on floppy discs, tapes and other media that are essentially lost because nobody has the equipment or software to read them any more. If nobody bothers to convert things then they will get lost to time.Imagine for a moment you are clearing out a relatives house, and you find a box of photos. Chances are some of those photos will be kept and passed on but what about a knackered old computer that you don't have the password for, in all likelihood that is going to be dumped without a second thought along with all the photo files.Today we find old scrolls or engravings from thousands of years ago and are able to read them, a thousand years from now if someone finds a USB drive, will it work, and even if it does will anyone be able to read it?


I could help out here, I've still got a floppy disc reader.
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