The Guardian Events | Grenfell Tower: One year on £15 (profits to charity) 28 June 2018 @1900h London
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The Guardian Events | Grenfell Tower: One year on £15 (profits to charity) 28 June 2018 @1900h London

11
Found 16th JunEdited by:"ParadisePapers"
Surprises me that nobody from the Housing Ombudsman (housing-ombudsman.org.uk ) will be part of the panel.

From The Guardian website:
Thursday 28 June 2018, 7pm–8.30pm
The Guardian, London, N1 9GU
£15 plus £1.32 booking fee
Partners/Patrons save £4.32 (20% off and no fees)

"When Grenfell Tower, a 24-storey block of public housing flats in North Kensington, erupted into flames on 14 June last year, it immediately became a symbol - and indictment - of housing and economic inequality in Britain. The tower had in previous years been subject to scrutiny by the Grenfell Action Group for not having safeguarding in place for a potential fire - but any requests for changes were ignored.

A year on from the fire, in which 72 people died, the inquest is still ongoing and many feel justice for the victims and their families has yet to be achieved. In the aftermath, fire checks were carried out in similarly-clad buildings across the country, but while a shocking number of buildings have failed those tests, tenant management organisations - such as the Kensington and Chelsea TMO responsible for Grenfell - are still not being held accountable.

How can we ensure those affected by the Grenfell disaster are not forgotten, and such a tragedy never happens again?

Join our panel of key voices - including Emma Dent Coad, Labour MP for Kensington; Natasha Elcock, member of survivors’ group Grenfell United; writer Anna Minton, author of 'Capital: Who is London for?'; Dr Lisa McKenzie, LSE sociology fellow and author of 'Getting By: Estates, Class and Culture in Austerity Britain'; and Guardian columnist Dawn Foster as chair - as we discuss the extraordinary efforts to rebuild the community, what the disaster reveals about our attitudes to housing support and those who need it most, and how we can act now to tackle Britain’s housing crisis for the future.

We will be screening Guardian short documentary The Tower Next Door, a film which weaves together intimately observed portraits of high-rise residents who live in the shadow of Grenfell Tower.

The evening will also feature Ben Okri performing a special reading of his poem 'Grenfell Tower, June 2017'.

All profits from this event will be donated to charities supporting those affected by the Grenfell tragedy.

Running time: 90 minutes, no interval.

Wheelchair users and visitors who require an assistant may bring a companion free of charge. To book a free companion ticket please email guardianlive.events@theguardian.com "

I mean no disrespect, but I could not post without picking a main group, but there were no 'Events' main group, so had to pick Home & Garden, but it clearly is nothing to do with diy, landscaping or decorating.
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This isn't a terror attack though, this is a case of government negligence due to corners being cut. 72 are dead and 223 homeless having lost everything and still without permanent accommodation over a year later.

It really saddens me that so many people seem to think caring is a zero sum game. "I care about this, so I can't care about that" if these other events matter so much start a charity and raise money yourself. Better than being bitter about people who have bothered.
mtc120 m ago

Each household in the block has received £80k from charity alone, much …Each household in the block has received £80k from charity alone, much more for relatives that died. That's on top of all the money and help from the government.


None of which you or I would get if our houses went on fire. Then there are those who have also benefitted from massive handouts who weren't even associated with Grenfell in any way, but managed to be put up in hotels, given preloaded credit cards and all the rest. Two prosecuted so far.
And there are the dodgy landlords who illegally sublet flats - not an uncommon practice in London - who won't face prosecution. Why not?

Yet another OP trying to milk a tragedy for political purposes.
11 Comments
This cow has been milked dry. Lots of British people have been victims of terror attacks over last 12 months or so and I don’t see anywhere near the amount of charities trying to help them
This isn't a terror attack though, this is a case of government negligence due to corners being cut. 72 are dead and 223 homeless having lost everything and still without permanent accommodation over a year later.

It really saddens me that so many people seem to think caring is a zero sum game. "I care about this, so I can't care about that" if these other events matter so much start a charity and raise money yourself. Better than being bitter about people who have bothered.
Winterborn13 m ago

This isn't a terror attack though, this is a case of government negligence …This isn't a terror attack though, this is a case of government negligence due to corners being cut. 72 are dead and 223 homeless having lost everything and still without permanent accommodation over a year later.It really saddens me that so many people seem to think caring is a zero sum game. "I care about this, so I can't care about that" if these other events matter so much start a charity and raise money yourself. Better than being bitter about people who have bothered.


Can’t make political comments on this website anymore.
Edited by: "eslick" 16th Jun
Each household in the block has received £80k from charity alone, much more for relatives that died. That's on top of all the money and help from the government.
mtc114 m ago

Each household in the block has received £80k from charity alone, much …Each household in the block has received £80k from charity alone, much more for relatives that died. That's on top of all the money and help from the government.


This is my point. They have received so much help. I barely hear of people helping those that suffered terror attacks
mtc120 m ago

Each household in the block has received £80k from charity alone, much …Each household in the block has received £80k from charity alone, much more for relatives that died. That's on top of all the money and help from the government.


None of which you or I would get if our houses went on fire. Then there are those who have also benefitted from massive handouts who weren't even associated with Grenfell in any way, but managed to be put up in hotels, given preloaded credit cards and all the rest. Two prosecuted so far.
And there are the dodgy landlords who illegally sublet flats - not an uncommon practice in London - who won't face prosecution. Why not?

Yet another OP trying to milk a tragedy for political purposes.
I don't think the money makes up for dead friends and relatives. Nor is the money enough if PTSD and injuries mean a survivor can't work for years. I don't envy them.
yespleasesir16th Jun

This cow has been milked dry. Lots of British people have been victims of …This cow has been milked dry. Lots of British people have been victims of terror attacks over last 12 months or so and I don’t see anywhere near the amount of charities trying to help them


Maybe you should start one instead of moaning.
yespleasesir4 h, 33 m ago

This cow has been milked dry. Lots of British people have been victims of …This cow has been milked dry. Lots of British people have been victims of terror attacks over last 12 months or so and I don’t see anywhere near the amount of charities trying to help them


The families of the victims who died at the Manchester attack are getting £250,000 each, anyone who spent a week in hospital has already had £60,000 from the fund set up after the attack.
Winterborn17 h, 54 m ago

This isn't a terror attack though, this is a case of government negligence …This isn't a terror attack though, this is a case of government negligence due to corners being cut. 72 are dead and 223 homeless having lost everything and still without permanent accommodation over a year later.It really saddens me that so many people seem to think caring is a zero sum game. "I care about this, so I can't care about that" if these other events matter so much start a charity and raise money yourself. Better than being bitter about people who have bothered.


It isn’t government negligence. One man set his flat alight . The classing was from a private company. And all the luvvies and pop start want to jump on this bandwagon to be seen to help. But it’s for their own gain . But British victims of terror don’t get the same .
yespleasesir1 h, 47 m ago

It isn’t government negligence. One man set his flat alight . The classing …It isn’t government negligence. One man set his flat alight . The classing was from a private company. And all the luvvies and pop start want to jump on this bandwagon to be seen to help. But it’s for their own gain . But British victims of terror don’t get the same .


You mean the highly flammable cladding covering the building that went up like kindling that one that was ok'd by the council that was chosen purely for it's aesthetic appeal. They don't just bolt that crap onto the side without it being checked and run through regulations. So what would you call it then?

Plus tbh i'd rather have a cynical act of charity that does some good than a genuine act of apathy.

Are you out organising for those British victims, it sounds like you're saying that because they weren't born here they deserved to burn to death or get no help after the fact even though they've lost everything. Generally terrorists aren't targeting people in their own homes and leaving them on the streets.

Like I said caring isn't a zero sum game if it matters to you get out and do something to help them.

You mean like Manchester just ignored the survivors of the arena bombing or how nobody did anything after the 7/7 attacks. There's no charity set up in the name of Lee Rigby.

Plus check the names and photos of the dead there's plenty of people you'll class as "british" too.
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