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The Lean Startup: How Constant Innovation Creates Radically Successful Businesses by Eric Ries - Kindle Edition now 99p @ Amazon
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The Lean Startup: How Constant Innovation Creates Radically Successful Businesses by Eric Ries - Kindle Edition now 99p @ Amazon

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Posted 30th May

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A really well reviewed book here for anyone interested in understanding the role of innovation and how to foster the spirit of creativity to build a business.

THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLING SENSATION

Most new businesses fail. But most of those failures are preventable.

Description
The Lean Startup is the approach to business that's being adopted around the world. It is changing the way companies are built and new products are launched.

The Lean Startup is about learning what your customers really want. It's about testing your vision continuously, adapting and adjusting before it's too late.

Now is the time to think Lean.

The Lean Startup changes everything - Harvard Business Review

Hope it helps someone.
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Joe90_guy30/05/2020 04:58

So this great repository of radical business 'thinking' creates a product …So this great repository of radical business 'thinking' creates a product (this book) which SHOULD be worth £14.99 but ends up being given away for the measly price of 99p? Sorry to rain on your parade but that's not being radical or innovative. That's just plain old incompetence!


Over 1 million copies sold, it's a very well known and recognised book for a lot of businesses, especially startups. I'm not sure I'd call it incompetence.

I bought this book in 2016 for £9.99, it came out in 2011 - so it's held a good price, this is just a great sale price.

If we use a 99p sale to highlight incompetence of writers then that factors in the likes of Terry Pratchett, etc... Not the best indicator
27 Comments
Excellent book and well well worth the 99p to have it in neat and tidy kindle format. If you are a complete tightwad then easy to find for free as pdf with a bit of googling
From the first bit of the title I thought this was a beginner's diet book
So this great repository of radical business 'thinking' creates a product (this book) which SHOULD be worth £14.99 but ends up being given away for the measly price of 99p? Sorry to rain on your parade but that's not being radical or innovative. That's just plain old incompetence!
Joe90_guy30/05/2020 04:58

So this great repository of radical business 'thinking' creates a product …So this great repository of radical business 'thinking' creates a product (this book) which SHOULD be worth £14.99 but ends up being given away for the measly price of 99p? Sorry to rain on your parade but that's not being radical or innovative. That's just plain old incompetence!


Joe90_guy30/05/2020 04:58

So this great repository of radical business 'thinking' creates a product …So this great repository of radical business 'thinking' creates a product (this book) which SHOULD be worth £14.99 but ends up being given away for the measly price of 99p? Sorry to rain on your parade but that's not being radical or innovative. That's just plain old incompetence!


Over 1 million copies sold, it's a very well known and recognised book for a lot of businesses, especially startups. I'm not sure I'd call it incompetence.

I bought this book in 2016 for £9.99, it came out in 2011 - so it's held a good price, this is just a great sale price.

If we use a 99p sale to highlight incompetence of writers then that factors in the likes of Terry Pratchett, etc... Not the best indicator
Skyhiigh30/05/2020 08:18

Over 1 million copies sold, it's a very well known and recognised book for …Over 1 million copies sold, it's a very well known and recognised book for a lot of businesses, especially startups. I'm not sure I'd call it incompetence.I bought this book in 2016 for £9.99, it came out in 2011 - so it's held a good price, this is just a great sale price.If we use a 99p sale to highlight incompetence of writers then that factors in the likes of Terry Pratchett, etc... Not the best indicator


For what it's worth, I'd disregard ANYTHING you ever see published in these kind of books, even if they do attain best seller status.

I remember having In 'Search Of Excellence' rammed down our throats in the early '80s & told we all had to be supremely organised like IBM & GE. And when these paragon companies went South, what did Tom Peters do? He wrote a follow-up book encouraging us all to Thrive On Chaos... the complete opposite of what he said first time round!
Joe90_guy30/05/2020 08:41

For what it's worth, I'd disregard ANYTHING you ever see published in …For what it's worth, I'd disregard ANYTHING you ever see published in these kind of books, even if they do attain best seller status. I remember having In 'Search Of Excellence' rammed down our throats in the early '80s & told we all had to be supremely organised like IBM & GE. And when these paragon companies went South, what did Tom Peters do? He wrote a follow-up book encouraging us all to Thrive On Chaos... the complete opposite of what he said first time round!


Yes, don't lead your life by a book. A good view is to just pick up a few ideas and things to try.

Then over time, try then out and see what works.

(And weirdly, that's also the basis of an MVP... )

There's also a lot of trash "be better" books, but this isn't one of them.

Companies go up/down for many reasons (IBM is now much more successful since the 80s, GE is on the floor)
People speak about jobs going to automation. What really happens is old, mature businesses with older processes and many staff slowly fall out of favour and the public favour small, cool, app based businesses instead with minimal levels of staffing.

Banks for example -

- RBS used to employ around 150000 staff in 2007, today its cut that to around 70000 staff. Rbs is losing customers to banks like monzo, starling and revolut who supply most of the same products as RBS but with a very small, lean, staff base.

- Revolut had around 250 staff 2 years ago and has 2500ish now largely because it's opened customer call centres with 1500 staff in Wales Iirc

I'd argue that to their customers, at least until they try and do something difficult or unusual, there's no difference day to day between revolut and rbs.

WhatsApp employs 75 staff. Think about that....

So 'lean' is the new buzzword, but if every business started from scratch today was lean then at least 90% of people would be unemployed.
Edited by: "Regprentice" 30th May
Regprentice30/05/2020 09:13

People speak about jobs going to automation. What really happens is old, …People speak about jobs going to automation. What really happens is old, mature businesses with older processes and many staff slowly fall out of favour and the public favour small, cool, app based businesses instead with minimal levels of staffing. Banks for example - - RBS used to employ around 150000 staff in 2007, today its cut that to around 70000 staff. Rbs is losing customers to banks like monzo, starling and revolut who supply most of the same products as RBS but with a very small, lean, staff base. - Revolut had around 250 staff 2 years ago and has 2500ish now largely because it's opened customer call centres with 1500 staff in Wales IircI'd argue that to their customers, at least until they try and do something difficult or unusual, there's no difference day to day between revolut and rbs. WhatsApp employs 75 staff. Think about that....So 'lean' is the new buzzword, but if every business started from scratch today was lean then at least 90% of people would be unemployed.


WhatApp have had more than 75 staff for years and Monzo is currently on a hiring spree
Edited by: "weiran" 30th May
Joe90_guy30/05/2020 08:41

For what it's worth, I'd disregard ANYTHING you ever see published in …For what it's worth, I'd disregard ANYTHING you ever see published in these kind of books, even if they do attain best seller status. I remember having In 'Search Of Excellence' rammed down our throats in the early '80s & told we all had to be supremely organised like IBM & GE. And when these paragon companies went South, what did Tom Peters do? He wrote a follow-up book encouraging us all to Thrive On Chaos... the complete opposite of what he said first time round!


So rather than admit your original comment was wrong, you pivot to a new argument and make a false equivalance to Beyond Re-engineering etc?

Rubbish. Lean Startup has very little to do with organisational structure. It shows entreprenuers how to validate business ideas cheaply so that we can learn what customers want and will pay for.

There is no *these kinds of books*.

As a multiple winner of several Lean Startup events and an alumni of several tech accelerators I can say that this book is a steal for 99p. However, the concepts have advanced considerably in the last 10 years and this should be a baseline only.

It is a good start for those trying to learn entreprenuerialism and how it particularly aligns with the tech industry.
Edited by: "CoolerKing_VH" 30th May
Regprentice30/05/2020 09:13

People speak about jobs going to automation. What really happens is old, …People speak about jobs going to automation. What really happens is old, mature businesses with older processes and many staff slowly fall out of favour and the public favour small, cool, app based businesses instead with minimal levels of staffing. Banks for example - - RBS used to employ around 150000 staff in 2007, today its cut that to around 70000 staff. Rbs is losing customers to banks like monzo, starling and revolut who supply most of the same products as RBS but with a very small, lean, staff base. - Revolut had around 250 staff 2 years ago and has 2500ish now largely because it's opened customer call centres with 1500 staff in Wales IircI'd argue that to their customers, at least until they try and do something difficult or unusual, there's no difference day to day between revolut and rbs. WhatsApp employs 75 staff. Think about that....So 'lean' is the new buzzword, but if every business started from scratch today was lean then at least 90% of people would be unemployed.


That is not the lean that Eric Reis is referring to, the lean part of the title is merely an homage to the principles of TPS etc which were the inspiration.

It means running business experiments and validating results in less time and with fewer resources. It does not mean usingn less staff when you scale to a full productionised service.

Speed to market is the key metric, not less staff.

You can Lean Startup almost anything, it does not mean you will need less staff than the incumbents if you reach market peak. You may need even more staff to ringfence your ongoing attempts at innovation.

If you want to reduce staff count then you need Six Sigma or another stopwatch/gemba based system and those have limited results and can yield false economies.
Edited by: "CoolerKing_VH" 30th May
CoolerKing_VH30/05/2020 09:43

So rather than admit your original comment was wrong, you pivot to a new …So rather than admit your original comment was wrong, you pivot to a new argument and make a false equivalance to Beyond Re-engineering etc?Rubbish. Lean Startup has very little to do with organisational structure. It shows entreprenuers how to validate business ideas cheaply so that we can learn what customers want.There is no *these kinds of books*.


Not really. In making an argument, I tend to favour Lloyd-George's approach which is to develop several strands & themes but focus them on making one central point. He got us through WWI at a time when we could easily have lost, so in a ranking of actual achievement, I might put him a tad higher up the scale than Eris Ries.

Oh, and there is 'this type of book' & most old salts like me recognise them for what they are. They're designed for the unthinking mind, for people that like their prescriptive solutions served up to them on a silver platter. Also they're weather vanes in that they point whichever way the wind is blowing at that point in time. When the wind changes (as it self-evidently is now) their carefully crafted arguments fall to dust... just in time for a sequel book to be written!
Joe90_guy30/05/2020 10:05

Not really. In making an argument, I tend to favour Lloyd-George's …Not really. In making an argument, I tend to favour Lloyd-George's approach which is to develop several strands & themes but focus them on making one central point. He got us through WWI at a time when we could easily have lost, so in a ranking of actual achievement, I might put him a tad higher up the scale than Eris Ries. Oh, and there is 'this type of book' & most old salts like me recognise them for what they are. They're designed for the unthinking mind, for people that like their prescriptive solutions served up to them on a silver platter. Also they're weather vanes in that they point whichever way the wind is blowing at that point in time. When the wind changes (as it self-evidently is now) their carefully crafted arguments fall to dust... just in time for a sequel book to be written!


Another pivot to absolute unrelated nonsense. If you represent old salts then it is easy to see why books "like this" are a necessity. They combat cynical, inflexible and toxic know it all mindsets like your own.

Here endeth the lesson old timer. I will send you an invoice.
Edited by: "CoolerKing_VH" 30th May
CoolerKing_VH30/05/2020 10:09

Another pivot to absolute unrelated nonsense. If you represent old salts …Another pivot to absolute unrelated nonsense. If you represent old salts then it is easy to see why books "like this" are a necessity. They combat cynical, inflexible and toxic know it all mindsets like your own. Here endeth the lesson old timer. I will send you an invoice.


Hmmm... now in my world, I'd put that down as an admission of failure, as characterised by an abject unwillingness to listen to any voice other than your own.

You can have that one for free Young Grasshopper...
Joe90_guy30/05/2020 10:18

Hmmm... now in my world, I'd put that down as an admission of failure, as …Hmmm... now in my world, I'd put that down as an admission of failure, as characterised by an abject unwillingness to listen to any voice other than your own. You can have that one for free Young Grasshopper...


The irony of you trashing a book and people experienced in the industry and then claiming they are unwilling to listen any voice other than their own.

That is gold! Let's see the next mental gymnastics you come out with.
Edited by: "CoolerKing_VH" 30th May
"Vanity metrics"
Regprentice30/05/2020 09:13

People speak about jobs going to automation. What really happens is old, …People speak about jobs going to automation. What really happens is old, mature businesses with older processes and many staff slowly fall out of favour and the public favour small, cool, app based businesses instead with minimal levels of staffing.


Ok so...how do you think those new businesses achieve that?

Primarily automation....

I saw a great quote recently. "Computers and automation won't take your jobs. But those who engage with and upskill with computers and automation will take the jobs of those that don't. "

It's not that jobs are lost to automation,it's that they change. And people are psychologically resistant to change.
MrShed30/05/2020 12:09

Ok so...how do you think those new businesses achieve that?Primarily …Ok so...how do you think those new businesses achieve that?Primarily automation....I saw a great quote recently. "Computers and automation won't take your jobs. But those who engage with and upskill with computers and automation will take the jobs of those that don't. "It's not that jobs are lost to automation,it's that they change. And people are psychologically resistant to change.


I'd argue that its only automation if the job was done by a person first. Other wise its just a computer process from the start.

That's the difference between a large business trying to reduce costs by cutting headcount, and a small business starting from scratch and using computer processes where possible.

If a large bank with 150,000 staff is replaced by a small one with 200 staff, where do all those lost jobs go. Mcdonald's?
weiran30/05/2020 09:32

WhatApp have had more than 75 staff for years and Monzo is …WhatApp have had more than 75 staff for years and Monzo is currently on a hiring spree


wired.com/201…rs/

They may well have more staff allocated since they were bought by Facebook, but for the majority of the time they built and run the business it was with between 50 and 75 staff. Most of their extra staff are customer services, because only young people like speaking to AI bits through an app, once

I understand Monzo have just raised capital and are expanding into the US so can understand why they would want more staff. But they don't need more to run their business if all they wanted to do is offer an app based current account product to UK customers
Regprentice30/05/2020 13:58

I'd argue that its only automation if the job was done by a person first. …I'd argue that its only automation if the job was done by a person first. Other wise its just a computer process from the start. That's the difference between a large business trying to reduce costs by cutting headcount, and a small business starting from scratch and using computer processes where possible. If a large bank with 150,000 staff is replaced by a small one with 200 staff, where do all those lost jobs go. Mcdonald's?


But the process was done by a person first... It just happened to be in another organisation.

I also think that its a stretch to say a bank of 150000 people has been replaced by one of 200. There's a long long way to go until Monzo etc are genuinely leaders in that sector in terms of market share (if it ever happens at all).

I'd agree completely that its easier for anew organisation to redesign processes from scratch rather than an existing one to pivot. This is an incredibly good thing. The barriers to entry in these markets have completely starved innovation and progress for decades, and has encouraged collusion.

Whilst the next statement is a little idealistic....look.at this on face value. As a species we are doing more with less effort. This cannot be, and isn't, a bad thing. Yes in the short term labour markets will change, and longer term there are even bigger shifts to come, but the overall productivity actually increases, which again isn't a bad thing.

People need to be more ready to move with the times regardless. It doesn't matter whether people think it's a good thing or a bad thing actually, it's happening anyway. The more people accept that and adapt their skills accordingly, the better.
Regprentice30/05/2020 13:58

I'd argue that its only automation if the job was done by a person first. …I'd argue that its only automation if the job was done by a person first. Other wise its just a computer process from the start. That's the difference between a large business trying to reduce costs by cutting headcount, and a small business starting from scratch and using computer processes where possible. If a large bank with 150,000 staff is replaced by a small one with 200 staff, where do all those lost jobs go. Mcdonald's?


To somewhere else simply.
Joe90_guy30/05/2020 04:58

So this great repository of radical business 'thinking' creates a product …So this great repository of radical business 'thinking' creates a product (this book) which SHOULD be worth £14.99 but ends up being given away for the measly price of 99p? Sorry to rain on your parade but that's not being radical or innovative. That's just plain old incompetence!


Read it first and then comment
craigbroadmansocial30/05/2020 18:42

Read it first and then comment


Do you become an expert in everything before you comment? Probably not.
Joe90_guy30/05/2020 19:21

Do you become an expert in everything before you comment? Probably not.


No, but I don't comment unless I have a certain level of understanding, otherwise I'd look a bit of a fool
craigbroadmansocial30/05/2020 19:33

No, but I don't comment unless I have a certain level of understanding, …No, but I don't comment unless I have a certain level of understanding, otherwise I'd look a bit of a fool


So if your chips happened to be soggy, you would buy a deep fat fryer & learn how to operate it properly before venting your dissatisfaction? Now if you did that, then you genuinely would look a bit of a fool...
Joe90_guy30/05/2020 19:40

So if your chips happened to be soggy, you would buy a deep fat fryer & …So if your chips happened to be soggy, you would buy a deep fat fryer & learn how to operate it properly before venting your dissatisfaction? Now if you did that, then you genuinely would look a bit of a fool...


I like your sense of humour
craigbroadmansocial30/05/2020 19:40

I like your sense of humour

What level of understanding of my sense of humour do you possess & is it sufficient to qualify you to make a comment?
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