Unfortunately, this deal is no longer valid
The Tattooist of Auschwitz: the heart-breaking and unforgettable international bestseller by Heather Morris Kindle Edition £1.99 @ Amazon
315° Expired

The Tattooist of Auschwitz: the heart-breaking and unforgettable international bestseller by Heather Morris Kindle Edition £1.99 @ Amazon

14
Posted 28th Sep

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

The Tattooist of Auschwitz: the heart-breaking and unforgettable international bestseller by Heather Morris Kindle Edition £1.99 @ Amazon Deal of the Day

For readers of Schindler's List, The Man Who Broke into Auschwitz and The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas comes a heart-breaking story of the very best of humanity in the very worst of circumstances.

I tattooed a number on her arm. She tattooed her name on my heart.

In 1942, Lale Sokolov arrived in Auschwitz-Birkenau. He was given the job of tattooing the prisoners marked for survival - scratching numbers into his fellow victims' arms in indelible ink to create what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust.

Waiting in line to be tattooed, terrified and shaking, was a young girl. For Lale - a dandy, a jack-the-lad, a bit of a chancer - it was love at first sight. And he was determined not only to survive himself, but to ensure this woman, Gita, did, too.

So begins one of the most life-affirming, courageous, unforgettable and human stories of the Holocaust: the love story of the tattooist of Auschwitz.
Community Updates

Groups

14 Comments
Great book..Highly recomended
Fantastic book a must read
Great christening present. Heat.
Audible add-on for £3.50, too. Means it costs £5.50 to get the audiobook, which is pretty good. Credits normally cost £6 each.
Every school child should be made to read this book and "The boy in the striped pyjamas'
"Deleted Comment"

Jesus thanks for ruining the ending.
Edited by: "GigahurtzUK" 28th Sep
tempt28/09/2019 08:28

Comment deleted


Just saved everyone from reading the book. Thanks.
Great book
Edited by: "lauraanne" 28th Sep
Mathew_White28/09/2019 08:09

Every school child should be made to read this book and "The boy in the …Every school child should be made to read this book and "The boy in the striped pyjamas'


What? It fake mate, it never happened. It a fiction book.
Brilliant read. Highly recommend.
First thing to remember when reading this book is that it is a story and NOT a biography of Lale Sokolov.

I read this book before it was published and, whilst I agree 100% with the story's structure and truths, I would suggest this story is a much watered down version of what life was really like in Auschwitz.
cibarious28/09/2019 11:15

First thing to remember when reading this book is that it is a story and …First thing to remember when reading this book is that it is a story and NOT a biography of Lale Sokolov.I read this book before it was published and, whilst I agree 100% with the story's structure and truths, I would suggest this story is a much watered down version of what life was really like in Auschwitz.


Exactly, which is why it's suitable for school kids as a study piece.

A real life account of life in Auschwitz would be too harrowing.
Mathew_White28/09/2019 13:14

Exactly, which is why it's suitable for school kids as a study piece.A …Exactly, which is why it's suitable for school kids as a study piece.A real life account of life in Auschwitz would be too harrowing.



Hi - that is the problem with this book, at least as I see it. The strapline - the heart-breaking and unforgettable international bestseller - implies something accurate and true and aimed at adults when the story is mostly targeted at Young Adults.

Personally, I do not see how a watered down version of what really happened contributes to historical accuracy? Also, as this book is not a biography, it is too easy to dismiss as "fiction". From what I know just about concentration camp trains, a short, accurate, biographical telling of the reality of the herding of people from their homes, onto trucks and then onto cattle trucks and the ensuing journey to the concentration camp gates would be graphic enough to let people's imagination conjure a much closer reality of concentration camp life.

It is important for young adults (and adults) to acknowledge and learn about the atrocities that happened when their grandparents (parents) were their age and this cannot happen if we dilute the reality to make it palatable.

If anyone wishes to read something that is gentle, shocking and profoundly sad whilst being accurate on all counts, please read Renia's Diary.

For me, this whole subject is summed up by this review - "'At a moment when basic agreement over simple truths has become a political battleground and history a weapon, the publication of the book, Renia’s Diary, offers a reminder of the power of bearing witness' - Joanna Berendt, New York Times"
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text