Toogood 260l Garden Composter - £20 @ Argos (Free Click & Collect)
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Toogood 260l Garden Composter - £20 @ Argos (Free Click & Collect)

£20£3033%Argos Deals
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Expires on 30/11/2019Posted 31st Oct
Was just browsing old hukd posts for garden composter inspiration, in anticipation of next summers gardening needs. Been feeling the cold creeping in lately so already dreaming of summer. Clicked on an expired link for the item at £19.99. Its now £20.00, still a third off and a very good size, cheered me right up. Hopefully will cheer up someone else too!
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The main thing with composting is to have a good mix of "greens" and "browns" to get a carbon/nitrogen mix. If you just put grass clippings and vegetable peelings in then you'll have a rotting slimey mess that's full of nitrogen and lacks carbon. If you have a pet such as a rabbit then you can add their hay/straw (and droppings too) to balace it out. If not, then you need to add things like paper, small pieces of cardboard, dried leaves etc (these are the "browns" and provide carbon). We put wood chips from our chicken bedding into our compost and it balances it out lovely. If your compost is right, then it won't smell at all.
Edited by: "cuffbertt" 31st Oct
My council charges to collect the garden waste bin, so for the last 2 years that bin has unintentionally been my free composter
33 Comments
My council charges to collect the garden waste bin, so for the last 2 years that bin has unintentionally been my free composter
I can never get the hang of composting. Tried lots of different methods over the years but always end up with just a slimey mess.
tyke31/10/2019 07:11

I can never get the hang of composting. Tried lots of different methods …I can never get the hang of composting. Tried lots of different methods over the years but always end up with just a slimey mess.


Me too - then the young buzzard wanted a rabbit and their mess went in the bin. Apart from when something got in and ate most of the worms we've had great compost ever since, despite the rabbit being no more. So find someone with a rabbit, offer to clean out the hutch - and put some mesh under the bin to keep the things you dont want out.
tyke31/10/2019 07:11

I can never get the hang of composting. Tried lots of different methods …I can never get the hang of composting. Tried lots of different methods over the years but always end up with just a slimey mess.


I just compost "in situ" once it's gone through the shredder, just spread it round the base of plants and it provides a haven for insects whilst it breaks down.
The main thing with composting is to have a good mix of "greens" and "browns" to get a carbon/nitrogen mix. If you just put grass clippings and vegetable peelings in then you'll have a rotting slimey mess that's full of nitrogen and lacks carbon. If you have a pet such as a rabbit then you can add their hay/straw (and droppings too) to balace it out. If not, then you need to add things like paper, small pieces of cardboard, dried leaves etc (these are the "browns" and provide carbon). We put wood chips from our chicken bedding into our compost and it balances it out lovely. If your compost is right, then it won't smell at all.
Edited by: "cuffbertt" 31st Oct
Thank you for posting and welcome heat added
Nice find! I bought a tumbling one last year and it’s great - I store the compost in mail bags till I need it, probably some sort of criminal offence I’m sure but the bags are strong and aerated so they are great for it while I make more
No base required? can rats nest in this one?
tyke31/10/2019 07:11

I can never get the hang of composting. Tried lots of different methods …I can never get the hang of composting. Tried lots of different methods over the years but always end up with just a slimey mess.


you need more browns that greens. LOADS MORE. 75% brown to 25% green
Thanks for all the replies. Looks like I'm a bit light in the brown department!
Ladylayx31/10/2019 06:59

My council charges to collect the garden waste bin, so for the last 2 …My council charges to collect the garden waste bin, so for the last 2 years that bin has unintentionally been my free composter


then they SELL your waste.

Nice people aren't they
tyke01/11/2019 08:49

Thanks for all the replies. Looks like I'm a bit light in the brown …Thanks for all the replies. Looks like I'm a bit light in the brown department!


You can also buy worms said to be good for composting yorkshire-worms.co.uk/pro…ms/
hullu31/10/2019 08:59

No base required? can rats nest in this one?


more likely to get mice than rats but yes. You should not put any meat or dairy in your bin but even if you dont they like the warm temperatures to breed and both mice and rats eat worms. We now have a piece of mesh underneath the bin but it needs to be very fine mesh if you want to keep mice out. Mice will get through a pen sized hole, rats need one about 3 times as big.
Ladylayx31/10/2019 06:59

My council charges to collect the garden waste bin, so for the last 2 …My council charges to collect the garden waste bin, so for the last 2 years that bin has unintentionally been my free composter


Good idea.
tfish01/11/2019 09:54

then they SELL your waste.Nice people aren't they


I'd rather they sell the waste and recycle something I can't than let it go to landfill
cuffbertt31/10/2019 08:08

The main thing with composting is to have a good mix of "greens" and …The main thing with composting is to have a good mix of "greens" and "browns" to get a carbon/nitrogen mix. If you just put grass clippings and vegetable peelings in then you'll have a rotting slimey mess that's full of nitrogen and lacks carbon. If you have a pet such as a rabbit then you can add their hay/straw (and droppings too) to balace it out. If not, then you need to add things like paper, small pieces of cardboard, dried leaves etc (these are the "browns" and provide carbon). We put wood chips from our chicken bedding into our compost and it balances it out lovely. If your compost is right, then it won't smell at all.


Leaves are gold for compost as they're high in carbon whereas most people typically have an abundance of materials high in nitrogen like grass clippings which as you say unbalances it and results in a smelly slimy pile. You want about two shovels of leaves for a shovel of grass clippings or other wet 'greens'. This time of year leaves are everywhere and probably covering your lawn, I find a lawn mower with basket a great way to quickly and easily collect them with the added benefit that it shreds them which means they compost far quicker (larger surface area). Shredded paper and cardboard are also good carbon sources to counterbalance greens - it's also probably better for the environment to recycle them in the compost at your own poperty than to leave them in a bin to be recyled at an energy-intensive plant miles away.
Creagle01/11/2019 11:45

Leaves are gold for compost as they're high in carbon whereas most people …Leaves are gold for compost as they're high in carbon whereas most people typically have an abundance of materials high in nitrogen like grass clippings which as you say unbalances it and results in a smelly slimy pile. You want about two shovels of leaves for a shovel of grass clippings or other wet 'greens'. This time of year leaves are everywhere and probably covering your lawn, I find a lawn mower with basket a great way to quickly and easily collect them with the added benefit that it shreds them which means they compost far quicker (larger surface area). Shredded paper and cardboard are also good carbon sources to counterbalance greens - it's also probably better for the environment to recycle them in the compost at your own poperty than to leave them in a bin to be recyled at an energy-intensive plant miles away.


Yes definitely, better in my compost than at the council's recycling centre

We don't have any mature trees, but our neighbour has an ash tree in their garden so we get a few leaves. Because we have chickens we have pleanty of browns from their bedding, we don't use the leaves in our compost. Instead, we use it to make leaf mould which gets spread around the vegetables the following year.
Edited by: "cuffbertt" 1st Nov
Councils hardly receive any money from garden waste which subsequently gets composted. The reason they do it is to reduce the landfill charges imposed upon them, which is why more councils are charging for garden waste rather than subsidised through council tax charges.
Also councils used to use garden waste towards strict recycling targets imposed by the government as garden waste is way heavier than a bin full of plastic, glass and paper.
cuffbertt31/10/2019 08:08

The main thing with composting is to have a good mix of "greens" and …The main thing with composting is to have a good mix of "greens" and "browns" to get a carbon/nitrogen mix. If you just put grass clippings and vegetable peelings in then you'll have a rotting slimey mess that's full of nitrogen and lacks carbon. If you have a pet such as a rabbit then you can add their hay/straw (and droppings too) to balace it out. If not, then you need to add things like paper, small pieces of cardboard, dried leaves etc (these are the "browns" and provide carbon). We put wood chips from our chicken bedding into our compost and it balances it out lovely. If your compost is right, then it won't smell at all.


Ahhh I do have a rabbit. That's great advice I shall try it.
Thanks for posting and a very belated welcome to hotukdeals @Shaziz we have added your thread to the Highlights page
Ladylayx31/10/2019 06:59

My council charges to collect the garden waste bin, so for the last 2 …My council charges to collect the garden waste bin, so for the last 2 years that bin has unintentionally been my free composter


Awww, we get garden waste collected every 2 weeks for free
To add carbon, I often add shredded paper and cardboard to my mix. Like said dont just add grass clippings they make the compost soggy mess on there own. You can add spent compost in small amounts. I have 6 composters 3 at home and 3 at allotment and get loads of nice compost each year. I recently got a shredder to now compost some small amounts of brown waste too. I dont turn mine over to get best result I do put a stick in and wriggle it around in various places to allow air in
Edited by: "shrek" 2nd Nov
tfish01/11/2019 09:54

then they SELL your waste.Nice people aren't they


As.compost
Creagle01/11/2019 11:45

Leaves are gold for compost as they're high in carbon whereas most people …Leaves are gold for compost as they're high in carbon whereas most people typically have an abundance of materials high in nitrogen like grass clippings which as you say unbalances it and results in a smelly slimy pile. You want about two shovels of leaves for a shovel of grass clippings or other wet 'greens'. This time of year leaves are everywhere and probably covering your lawn, I find a lawn mower with basket a great way to quickly and easily collect them with the added benefit that it shreds them which means they compost far quicker (larger surface area). Shredded paper and cardboard are also good carbon sources to counterbalance greens - it's also probably better for the environment to recycle them in the compost at your own poperty than to leave them in a bin to be recyled at an energy-intensive plant miles away.


Does pine kernels catkins count as browns have loads of them
frankie1g02/11/2019 11:44

Does pine kernels catkins count as browns have loads of them


I would suspect they are green. Things that were recently alive and therefore are typically wetter have high nitrogen levels whereas older, dry materials that are typically brown like cardboard, woody branches and fallen leaves are higher on carbon. Pine needles on the other hand are very high in carbon. Though you have to be careful with pine needles as they are acidic and retain that acidity through the composting process, you therefore only want to use them if the compost will be used for acidic-loving plants or other materials in the pile will balanced out the quantity you add.

This link shows the typical C:N ratio of many common garden materials, though it is not specific enough to include pine kernel catkins! planetnatural.com/com…io/

What you will see from the link is that you are aiming for a mixture of materials that averages out at about 30 parts of carbon to 1 part nitrogen. It's not worth treating it as an exact science and everyone will have some luck by just getting a good mixture of materials. Just be wary that high nitrogen piles get a bit smelly and you loose some nitrogen that you would be retained if more browns were mixed in. But since there's much more green material available typically, it's rare you will have a pile with too much brown material but if you do the pile will decompose into compost much slower. A well mixed pile can create fine good compost in under 12 months.
buzzard01/11/2019 10:04

more likely to get mice than rats but yes. You should not put any meat or …more likely to get mice than rats but yes. You should not put any meat or dairy in your bin but even if you dont they like the warm temperatures to breed and both mice and rats eat worms. We now have a piece of mesh underneath the bin but it needs to be very fine mesh if you want to keep mice out. Mice will get through a pen sized hole, rats need one about 3 times as big.


Thanks, mesh a good idea. The heat generated must attract the rodents.
hullu03/11/2019 18:40

Thanks, mesh a good idea. The heat generated must attract the rodents.


I have heard of people having success adding animal products / dairy to compost but never have myself and it doesn't seem worth the risk. If you do though the best bet is burying it in the middle to suppress the odour from escaping making it harder for rodents to sniff out. Since mice dislike the smell of most herbs, including lavender, that would seem like the ideal material to surround any animal products in.
erm. whats your point?
lf1983lf01/11/2019 10:31

I'd rather they sell the waste and recycle something I can't than let it …I'd rather they sell the waste and recycle something I can't than let it go to landfill


LOL nice sentiment until you realise YOU ARE PAYING THEM to do it
tfish07/11/2019 11:05

LOL nice sentiment until you realise YOU ARE PAYING THEM to do it


I'm not sure how you figure that out, food and garden recycling is covered by my council tax, that I'd have to pay regardless. Even if I had to pay extra for the service, I would, because trying to **** the planet as little as possible is the only ethical choice!
lf1983lf07/11/2019 18:30

I'm not sure how you figure that out, food and garden recycling is covered …I'm not sure how you figure that out, food and garden recycling is covered by my council tax, that I'd have to pay regardless. Even if I had to pay extra for the service, I would, because trying to **** the planet as little as possible is the only ethical choice!


Erm. Paying council tax for garden waste collection 'isn't paying for it'? interesting.
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