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Top Tech Roadside Test & Repair Tool Kit from £7.99 delivered Eurocarparts
Top Tech Roadside Test & Repair Tool Kit from £7.99 delivered Eurocarparts

Top Tech Roadside Test & Repair Tool Kit from £7.99 delivered Eurocarparts

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I think I have seen this before at £7.99 - I guess even for just the jump lead itself it's worth that price (although of course it won't be a high amp lead).

Code XMAS doesn't work on this but you can get cashback from TCB.

Contains:
- 10mm Jump Leads
- Hand Pliers
- 2 x Screw Drivers
- 1 x Electrical Screwdriver
- 9pc Socket Set (with hand driver)
- Emergency Fuse Set
- 3 x Wrench Spanners

10 Comments

Man's best friend.. After the dog that is lol! Heat added

Cheap tat. Waste of £7.99. If you think these tools are worth having, best not lift the bonnet when you break down. Put the money towards a breakdown/recovery service.

qbs

Cheap tat. Waste of £7.99. If you think these tools are worth having, … Cheap tat. Waste of £7.99. If you think these tools are worth having, best not lift the bonnet when you break down. Put the money towards a breakdown/recovery service.


https://i.cbc.ca/1.1674748.1379081034!/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/16x9_620/li-620-scrooge-cp-7608083.jpg

I have to agree its not good, as it does not include a diagnostic computer tool, which every car needs nowadays!
most people cannot change a wheel let alone diagnose a fault with these tools, open the test and repair tool kit, raise the bonnet, if you know where the release catch is, look at the engine cover, call the RAC ! lol

qbs

Cheap tat. Waste of £7.99. If you think these tools are worth having, … Cheap tat. Waste of £7.99. If you think these tools are worth having, best not lift the bonnet when you break down. Put the money towards a breakdown/recovery service.



​I agree with this.
My partner bought this recently and the jump leads failed to start my car again!!

Original Poster

germainsophie

​I agree with this.My partner bought this recently and the jump leads f … ​I agree with this.My partner bought this recently and the jump leads failed to start my car again!!



Did you leave it for a bit longer for the battery to build up voltage? I think these jump leads are of lower amp so it'd take a few minutes.

ymmf

Did you leave it for a bit longer for the battery to build up voltage? I … Did you leave it for a bit longer for the battery to build up voltage? I think these jump leads are of lower amp so it'd take a few minutes.


You really don't know what you're talking about do you. The purpose of jump leads is to deliver sufficient current at the correct voltage to start the vehicle with the duff battery.
If the jumper lead cross section isn't adequate to carry that current, and/or the terminal clips aren't strong enough to make good contact and/or the clips aren't high pressure crimped onto the cable, you're wasting your time, and money.
All that's missing from this "toolkit" is a knicker elastic towrope.
I'd be interested to hear what you think you might be able to repair with the motley assortment of Christmas cracker tools that are included.

Original Poster

qbs

You really don't know what you're talking about do you. The purpose of … You really don't know what you're talking about do you. The purpose of jump leads is to deliver sufficient current at the correct voltage to start the vehicle with the duff battery. If the jumper lead cross section isn't adequate to carry that current, and/or the terminal clips aren't strong enough to make good contact and/or the clips aren't high pressure crimped onto the cable, you're wasting your time, and money.All that's missing from this "toolkit" is a knicker elastic towrope.I'd be interested to hear what you think you might be able to repair with the motley assortment of Christmas cracker tools that are included.



Maybe I don't. My thoughts were that if these jump leads are too thin (as you mentioned) it may take longer for sufficient current to be delivered.

I never suggested that this toolkit is the best. I merely said it could be worth the money just for the lead.

ymmf

Maybe I don't. My thoughts were that if these jump leads are too thin (as … Maybe I don't. My thoughts were that if these jump leads are too thin (as you mentioned) it may take longer for sufficient current to be delivered. I never suggested that this toolkit is the best. I merely said it could be worth the money just for the lead.


Ok. You're not trying to charge the duff battery. The jump leads are there to start the car from the other car's battery. If you connect the two batteries and wait, you'll end up with two flat batteries, neither of which will have enough oomph to start a car.
As a guide, jumper cables need to be at least as thick as the battery cables. This will give a decent current carrying capacity (proportional to conductor cross sectional area) and minimise volt drop by minimising resistance. Most jumper leads like these have poor quality clips with weak springs and poor contact between cable and clip due to rubbish crimping. If you can open the clips with finger to thumb pressure, they're probably not strong enough to get a decent grip.
The correct jump procedure is to carefully connect the leads from good car battery (which should have the engine running), to duff battery, being extremely careful not to touch anything other than the correct terminals with the leads. Give the running car a bit of throttle (doesn't need to be screaming) then start the other car. As soon as it starts, remove the jump leads one at a time, again being careful not to touch anything. Then do 15 to 20 miles to recharge the battery. It's a good idea to stop on a hill facing downhill at some point. Try to start the car after 10 minutes. If the battery doesn't have enough oomph to start the car, you need an auto electrician to check the battery and charging system.

Original Poster

qbs

Ok. You're not trying to charge the duff battery. The jump leads are … Ok. You're not trying to charge the duff battery. The jump leads are there to start the car from the other car's battery. If you connect the two batteries and wait, you'll end up with two flat batteries, neither of which will have enough oomph to start a car.As a guide, jumper cables need to be at least as thick as the battery cables. This will give a decent current carrying capacity (proportional to conductor cross sectional area) and minimise volt drop by minimising resistance. Most jumper leads like these have poor quality clips with weak springs and poor contact between cable and clip due to rubbish crimping. If you can open the clips with finger to thumb pressure, they're probably not strong enough to get a decent grip.The correct jump procedure is to carefully connect the leads from good car battery (which should have the engine running), to duff battery, being extremely careful not to touch anything other than the correct terminals with the leads. Give the running car a bit of throttle (doesn't need to be screaming) then start the other car. As soon as it starts, remove the jump leads one at a time, again being careful not to touch anything. Then do 15 to 20 miles to recharge the battery. It's a good idea to stop on a hill facing downhill at some point. Try to start the car after 10 minutes. If the battery doesn't have enough oomph to start the car, you need an auto electrician to check the battery and charging system.



Brilliant stuff. Thank you so much for the information!
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