Toshiba N300 High Reliability 4TB Internal NAS Hard Drive 7K2 RPM  3.5  SATA £99.99 - Amazon
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Toshiba N300 High Reliability 4TB Internal NAS Hard Drive 7K2 RPM 3.5 SATA £99.99 - Amazon

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Found 22nd JanEdited by:"Adult"
4TB Internal hard drive for NAS etc

HDWQ140UZSVA
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Better than the Low Reliability version.
14 Comments
Better than the Low Reliability version.
Anyone know how these compare to the WD Reds? I was looking at the 4TB Reds on Amazon for £116.99.
I bought one in december from Ebuyer as a steam/storage drive failed already might just have been unlucky but first time i've bought anything other than seagate/wd
Edited by: "B3aver" 22nd Jan
Keep in mind that for home NAS you may prefer 5400rpm drive (like WD Red, not to be confused with WD Red pro which is 7200rpm) as 7200rpm drives are much noisier and hotter. It's not a problem in server room where is noisy anyway and usually equipped with proper aircon, but at home can be really annoying.

Speed difference is not so big, especially when NAS is used to store big files like photos, movies or backups. (higher rotation speed helps with seek/access time, not so much with data transfer rate, the latter is most critical in NAS)

I'm not against this particular drive, just trying to help to make right choice
Edited by: "HaraldBB" 22nd Jan
HaraldBB1 h, 4 m ago

..higher rotation speed helps with seek/access time, not so much with data …..higher rotation speed helps with seek/access time, not so much with data transfer rate...


Most of your post made sense but the sequential transfer rate is directly related to the rotation speed with all other things being equal.
Aerial density is equally important of course.
Agharta14 m ago

Most of your post made sense but the sequential transfer rate is directly …Most of your post made sense but the sequential transfer rate is directly related to the rotation speed with all other things being equal.Aerial density is equally important of course.


Most of your post made sense, until you started talking about aerials.

Areal density is very important when considering maximum sustained data rates from drives - however max sustained rates aren't often so important. For network-attached storage for example, unless you have 10G Ethernet (and let's be honest, no normal person does at home) you'll never hit a sustained transfer in anything other than a synthetic benchmark with modern drives regardless of their spindle rpm.
Agharta17 m ago

Most of your post made sense but the sequential transfer rate is directly …Most of your post made sense but the sequential transfer rate is directly related to the rotation speed with all other things being equal.Aerial density is equally important of course.


Theoretically yes.
In real world.. please compare:

wdc.com/con…pdf

wdc.com/con…pdf

(this is for WD RED, but even better, mostly same design, main difference is rotation speed)
30% difference FOR HOME USE usually can be ignored, time difference for ~150MB video will be 1s vs. 1.3s. Again - this is assuming home NAS is used for storage, backups etc. If you're heavy semi-pro user shifting terabytes daily and don't care about noise, as you have separate room for computers - go for 7200 or even 10k disks.
lilbeastie7 h, 26 m ago

Areal density is very important when considering maximum sustained data …Areal density is very important when considering maximum sustained data rates from drives - however max sustained rates aren't often so important. For network-attached storage for example, unless you have 10G Ethernet (and let's be honest, no normal person does at home) you'll never hit a sustained transfer in anything other than a synthetic benchmark with modern drives regardless of their spindle rpm.


Spindle speed effects all drives not just NAS labelled ones.
Of course the actual performance level will depend on any other bottlenecks in the installation it is within but that is a given anyway; common sense really.
HaraldBB7 h, 28 m ago

30% difference FOR HOME USE usually can be ignored


You are responding to an objective observation with a subjective opinion which is irrelevant really.
No, I'm responding to theoretical numbers with real life experience based on many machines installed/used
Whats the warranty cover on these drives ?
lilbeastie22nd Jan

... For network-attached storage for example, unless you have 10G Ethernet …... For network-attached storage for example, unless you have 10G Ethernet (and let's be honest, no normal person does at home) you'll never hit a sustained transfer in anything other than a synthetic benchmark with modern drives regardless of their spindle rpm.

10GB networking is becoming less expensive and an option for semi-pro users.
e.g. TPLink T1700g-28TQ is fanless and offers 4x 10GB and 24x 1GB ports for 230eur at amazon.fr
Plus ebay has 2x Mellanox 10GB half-height 10GB cards plus cable for £70.
Two of those plus the switch plus 2 cables gives 10Gbe for 4 machines for £350 - about £80 per machine.
Hootwo38 m ago

10GB networking is becoming less expensive and an option for semi-pro …10GB networking is becoming less expensive and an option for semi-pro users.e.g. TPLink T1700g-28TQ is fanless and offers 4x 10GB and 24x 1GB ports for 230eur at amazon.frPlus ebay has 2x Mellanox 10GB half-height 10GB cards plus cable for £70.Two of those plus the switch plus 2 cables gives 10Gbe for 4 machines for £350 - about £80 per machine.


so not normal home use then - remember most people just want an extra few gigabit ports, which is why 5-port Netgear kit for a tenner from Amazon goes hot on here.

And your pricing is correct, but a little misleading. As you're going the SFP+ direct connect cable route rather than using fibre modules and fibre cabling, you're really limited to VERY expensive, VERY short cabling. Fine to link all your kit in a rack, but entirely useless if you have a fileserver in one room and a workstation in another. If however you do have your kit all located in the same place, you could get a much smaller (and cheaper) copper-only switch without 10G, and just get the Mellanox cards/cables and direct connect your main equipment - linking 2/3 machines with a 10G backbone for £70-100 is not a bad dea.

I did something similar with infiniband kit a while back though - to be honest it's not really worth the effort for home use (semi-pro or otherwise). Now I just have 4 gigabit NICs in my server and 2 or 4 in my main workstations, and let Multichannel take care of things to boost throughput where possible. 99% of the time the transfers are just as fast as my old 10G network, but it's a lot simpler to set up and manage through a single switch.
merchant_ac22nd Jan

Better than the Low Reliability version.


If you think slower is better then yes.
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