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TP-Link 1300Mbps Gigabit Passthrough Powerline Kit - £54.99 @ Argos
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TP-Link 1300Mbps Gigabit Passthrough Powerline Kit - £54.99 @ Argos

£54.99£67.5019%Argos Deals
27
258° Expired
TP-Link 1300Mbps Gigabit Passthrough Powerline Kit - £54.99 @ Argos
Posted 9th Aug 2020

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

I've been looking at upgrading my current set and these seemed to be a good price. On clearance so availability might be spotty.

Hopefully of use to someone.
Community Updates
27 Comments
My experience of pass through powerline plugs isn't great.

Good for a while, then burn out/overheat.

Something to do with UK plugs, no idea why.

Some manufacturers have stopped selling them into the UK.
These are very hit and miss, I have one in my office/shed. There is a drop out 20 times a day and I have full to the door fibre. Common sense suggests you shouldn’t use them as substitute plug socket. The max I run through mine is a phone charger.
BingoBertie09/08/2020 22:44

My experience of pass through powerline plugs isn't great.Good for a …My experience of pass through powerline plugs isn't great.Good for a while, then burn out/overheat.Something to do with UK plugs, no idea why.Some manufacturers have stopped selling them into the UK.


I've had a gigabit set for over 5 years and never had an issue in multiple homes. Generally I find you get what you pay for, there are cheap ones that are frankly rubbish, but tp-links at least mid range and up never seem to have an issue.

It's not the plugs that are the issue. A lot of countries use lower mains voltage and you need to design for counties with higher, which cheap crappy ones don't do and hence why they aren't sold in the UK as electrical safety is one of the better regulated areas.
edwardo197309/08/2020 22:55

These are very hit and miss, I have one in my office/shed. There is a drop …These are very hit and miss, I have one in my office/shed. There is a drop out 20 times a day and I have full to the door fibre. Common sense suggests you shouldn’t use them as substitute plug socket. The max I run through mine is a phone charger.


Common sense? They're designed to pass through so they can handle pretty much anything you plug in as they aren't doing anything direct with that power. Have drawn well over 1.2 KW on the regular through them for a long time and had no issues.

If you have drop outs it's possible it's your powerline itself. They are pretty clever and increasingly will work where they wouldn't before, but if you aren't on the same ring or at the furthest extreme of distance they don't work very well. If it has to go through a breaker between the access points it's not reliable at all.
Edited by: "smckirdy" 10th Aug
I have had these for the last 6 months and they work well for me with no issues. I also use the TL-WPA8630PKIT versions, so 4 powerline devices in all. As usual, nothing like the rated speed. I do think these things are hit and miss with most of the variability down to your wiring.41627055-HuogA.jpg
edwardo197309/08/2020 22:55

These are very hit and miss, I have one in my office/shed. There is a drop …These are very hit and miss, I have one in my office/shed. There is a drop out 20 times a day and I have full to the door fibre. Common sense suggests you shouldn’t use them as substitute plug socket. The max I run through mine is a phone charger.


It doesn't matter if you have full fibre, these adapters will be affected by the quality of your electrical cabling. I'm imagining a long mains extension out to a shed may not be optimal.
smckirdy10/08/2020 08:36

I've had a gigabit set for over 5 years and never had an issue in multiple …I've had a gigabit set for over 5 years and never had an issue in multiple homes. Generally I find you get what you pay for, there are cheap ones that are frankly rubbish, but tp-links at least mid range and up never seem to have an issue.It's not the plugs that are the issue. A lot of countries use lower mains voltage and you need to design for counties with higher, which cheap crappy ones don't do and hence why they aren't sold in the UK as electrical safety is one of the better regulated areas.Common sense? They're designed to pass through so they can handle pretty much anything you plug in as they aren't doing anything direct with that power. Have drawn well over 1.2 KW on the regular through them for a long time and had no issues.If you have drop outs it's possible it's your powerline itself. They are pretty clever and increasingly will work where they wouldn't before, but if you aren't on the same ring or at the furthest extreme of distance they don't work very well. If it has to go through a breaker between the access points it's not reliable at all.


Strangely....tplink are one of the ones that I had to return as slowly but surely after a period of only months they simply stopped working. I noticed that there was clearly an overheating issue.

Zyxel stopped supplying the UK as they realised they had an issue with the UK wiring.

Loving your inference that I bought cheaply & that youre clearly more knowledgeable than others. Having spent £600 on the tplink pass through plugs for 3x twin packs, I personally would consider that to be top end of the market, just one step away from running a wired system through the entire house.

I've done substantial research at my own expense on these pass through plugs & would never touch them with a barge pole again. Standard powerline plugs without the pass through option every time for me - more stable connection, faster connection speed & cheaper too.
Bubbles_Jones10/08/2020 08:52

It doesn't matter if you have full fibre, these adapters will be affected …It doesn't matter if you have full fibre, these adapters will be affected by the quality of your electrical cabling. I'm imagining a long mains extension out to a shed may not be optimal.


You may find swapping to tplink re650 gives you a much more stable connection + faster speed.
edwardo197309/08/2020 22:55

These are very hit and miss, I have one in my office/shed. There is a drop …These are very hit and miss, I have one in my office/shed. There is a drop out 20 times a day and I have full to the door fibre. Common sense suggests you shouldn’t use them as substitute plug socket. The max I run through mine is a phone charger.



You may find swapping to tplink re650 gives you a much more stable connection + faster speed.
Note these don't have Wi-Fi in them. So they are just powerline to ethernet.
rincage10/08/2020 08:50

I have had these for the last 6 months and they work well for me with no …I have had these for the last 6 months and they work well for me with no issues. I also use the TL-WPA8630PKIT versions, so 4 powerline devices in all. As usual, nothing like the rated speed. I do think these things are hit and miss with most of the variability down to your wiring.[Image]


Generally the non-pass through powerlines will work happily for years, with little or no issues.

Once you move over to the pass through versions, a year to 18months & they start to fail due to overheating.

I've found the use of a tplink re650 then using the ethernet port of that into a powerline plug & another powerline plug where you need it, is a neat way of boosting the speed & creating a more stable connection at greater distance.
BingoBertie10/08/2020 09:02

Generally the non-pass through powerlines will work happily for years, …Generally the non-pass through powerlines will work happily for years, with little or no issues.Once you move over to the pass through versions, a year to 18months & they start to fail due to overheating.I've found the use of a tplink re650 then using the ethernet port of that into a powerline plug & another powerline plug where you need it, is a neat way of boosting the speed & creating a more stable connection at greater distance.


Latency probably takes a hit in that set up I imagine?
BingoBertie10/08/2020 08:52

Strangely....tplink are one of the ones that I had to return as slowly but …Strangely....tplink are one of the ones that I had to return as slowly but surely after a period of only months they simply stopped working. I noticed that there was clearly an overheating issue.Zyxel stopped supplying the UK as they realised they had an issue with the UK wiring.Loving your inference that I bought cheaply & that youre clearly more knowledgeable than others. Having spent £600 on the tplink pass through plugs for 3x twin packs, I personally would consider that to be top end of the market, just one step away from running a wired system through the entire house.I've done substantial research at my own expense on these pass through plugs & would never touch them with a barge pole again. Standard powerline plugs without the pass through option every time for me - more stable connection, faster connection speed & cheaper too.


I didn't infer anything in particular, if you read that in it I would say it's more your bias. Like I said I've used pass through for years, in multiple homes up and down the country, put it in many friends and families homes as well and zero issues. Some of the early units regardless of pass through or not did fail a fair bit, but haven't seen that be a common issue since they were new on the market.

I wouldn't connect a space heater to one, but if you've got other electronics on it they are totally fine. And if they do fail for that it's a warranty issue, as a general rule as long as you don't put anything you wouldn't be advised to put on a gang adapter then you will be fine. For most you are talking plugging the router itself into it at one end, and say a TV or a laptop at the other, maybe a lamp. Just don't plug the washing machine or a space heater and you should be ok.

The majority of issues I've seen and experienced with these are almost always people where there homes wiring looks like it was done by a pack of deranged monkeys rather than electricians, where they try and mix and match units i.e. add to a network, or they have a nuisance item connected to the power which has been anything from washing machines to faulty circuit breakers and fixing that problem fixed a whole bunch of other issues i.e. frequent fuse replacements, occasional dead chargers etc.

You can still buy Zyxel adapters, they are though rubbish in every country from what I've heard. Likely like all the British specific things like this it just probably isn't worth the margin for them as unlike Phillips with Hue they can't really add 20 quid to the price for a UK plug and get away with it.
RG3510/08/2020 09:35

Latency probably takes a hit in that set up I imagine?


Ping 14ms
BingoBertie10/08/2020 10:01

Ping 14ms


14ms ping at the end of a powerline connector attached to a wifi extender? I'm sat about a metre away from my router on my laptop and I'm getting between 8 and 13 over a couple of tests to Google.com
I've had Tp installed in the house for 4 years with no issues.

I added the the 3port & Wifi version and it gives better wifi than the BT discs. Only issue I have is I can't reset that to another ssid as i'm going to use that as the guest wifi.
smckirdy10/08/2020 10:00

I didn't infer anything in particular, if you read that in it I would say …I didn't infer anything in particular, if you read that in it I would say it's more your bias. Like I said I've used pass through for years, in multiple homes up and down the country, put it in many friends and families homes as well and zero issues. Some of the early units regardless of pass through or not did fail a fair bit, but haven't seen that be a common issue since they were new on the market.I wouldn't connect a space heater to one, but if you've got other electronics on it they are totally fine. And if they do fail for that it's a warranty issue, as a general rule as long as you don't put anything you wouldn't be advised to put on a gang adapter then you will be fine. For most you are talking plugging the router itself into it at one end, and say a TV or a laptop at the other, maybe a lamp. Just don't plug the washing machine or a space heater and you should be ok.The majority of issues I've seen and experienced with these are almost always people where there homes wiring looks like it was done by a pack of deranged monkeys rather than electricians, where they try and mix and match units i.e. add to a network, or they have a nuisance item connected to the power which has been anything from washing machines to faulty circuit breakers and fixing that problem fixed a whole bunch of other issues i.e. frequent fuse replacements, occasional dead chargers etc. You can still buy Zyxel adapters, they are though rubbish in every country from what I've heard. Likely like all the British specific things like this it just probably isn't worth the margin for them as unlike Phillips with Hue they can't really add 20 quid to the price for a UK plug and get away with it.


So a newly rewired fully electrically certified home should have no issues with tplink pass through powerline plugs, assuming you're pulling less than 2kw through it, the standard UK socket being haapily capable of 3kw

Sorry to break the news to you, that from personal experience, this is not the case. After a year to 18months in my personal experience the pass through versions fail, as over time they overheat.

Zyxel, again, from personal 1st hand experience, non pass through powerline plugs had one of the fastest & most reliable connections, even over distance & were highly rated/regarded by numerous tech magazines that tested them.

Sorry to disagree with you. But I'm doing so from many years of personal experience with many different versions of the latest tech at the time, with many thousands of pounds spent.

You are of course fully entitled to your opinion, but having had so much personal experience with these plugs, my advice would always be avoid the pass through versions, dedicate a socket for the powerline only for a decent connection that lasts for years.
RG3510/08/2020 10:04

14ms ping at the end of a powerline connector attached to a wifi extender? …14ms ping at the end of a powerline connector attached to a wifi extender? I'm sat about a metre away from my router on my laptop and I'm getting between 8 and 13 over a couple of tests to Google.com


If you need to change the ssid take a look at tplink re650, this will allow you to do that, combine it with a tplink gigabit switch if you need more than one ethernet port.

You will find the speed output from the ethernet port on the re650 to be much improved.
RG3510/08/2020 10:04

14ms ping at the end of a powerline connector attached to a wifi extender? …14ms ping at the end of a powerline connector attached to a wifi extender? I'm sat about a metre away from my router on my laptop and I'm getting between 8 and 13 over a couple of tests to Google.com


My desktop in my outside office is circa 30m away from my router. So I'm pretty happy with that ping rate, it does go lower, but with ookla speed tests coming in at 150mbps download, with an upload of 19/20mbps I'm happy with that.

Virginmedia 200mbps broadband installed with Asus GT-AC5300 router.

I'm looking to upgrade to a wifi 6 router, but at the moment there nothing out there that hits the right buttons for me. Better to wait till November or March & keep an eye on what gets released.
Have to hard disagree on the pass through vs. standalone power lines. Had nothing but issues when they weren't passthrough, presumably the noise generated by whatever was plugged in next to them causing the problems.

Been running some passthrough Zyxels now for about 3 years over 2 separate houses (one fairly new, one brand new, so decent wiring). Had absolutely no issues with speed (get full external speed, decent internal speed from PC to NAS) or latency (played a lot of CS:GO which requires a very stable connection to get the most out of).

Unfortunate to hear Zyxel pulled out of the UK market because I've been waiting to pick up a second pair so that I can connect the living room and bedroom TVs via powerline (Sky router + 1st gen chromecast = very poor wifi connection).
Joshimitsu9110/08/2020 10:42

Have to hard disagree on the pass through vs. standalone power lines. Had …Have to hard disagree on the pass through vs. standalone power lines. Had nothing but issues when they weren't passthrough, presumably the noise generated by whatever was plugged in next to them causing the problems.Been running some passthrough Zyxels now for about 3 years over 2 separate houses (one fairly new, one brand new, so decent wiring). Had absolutely no issues with speed (get full external speed, decent internal speed from PC to NAS) or latency (played a lot of CS:GO which requires a very stable connection to get the most out of).Unfortunate to hear Zyxel pulled out of the UK market because I've been waiting to pick up a second pair so that I can connect the living room and bedroom TVs via powerline (Sky router + 1st gen chromecast = very poor wifi connection).


You should still be able to get zyxel powerlines, but probably not the pass through versions.

Chap in charge at their HQ told me it would take 6months to rectify the issues with the pass throughs, he was rather surprised when I said no issue I'll wait.

Unfortunately after only 2months he came back to me & told me they'd pulled them from the UK market due to some unknown irregularities with overheating.

You might get the odd seller with some stock, regrettably I wouldnt give them more than 6months before they die. Wish it was different as the speeds from them was amazing.
BingoBertie10/08/2020 10:14

So a newly rewired fully electrically certified home should have no issues …So a newly rewired fully electrically certified home should have no issues with tplink pass through powerline plugs, assuming you're pulling less than 2kw through it, the standard UK socket being haapily capable of 3kw Sorry to break the news to you, that from personal experience, this is not the case. After a year to 18months in my personal experience the pass through versions fail, as over time they overheat.Zyxel, again, from personal 1st hand experience, non pass through powerline plugs had one of the fastest & most reliable connections, even over distance & were highly rated/regarded by numerous tech magazines that tested them.Sorry to disagree with you. But I'm doing so from many years of personal experience with many different versions of the latest tech at the time, with many thousands of pounds spent.You are of course fully entitled to your opinion, but having had so much personal experience with these plugs, my advice would always be avoid the pass through versions, dedicate a socket for the powerline only for a decent connection that lasts for years.



Absolutely had issues with new homes, older ones tended to work better actually. With new homes there are some pretty shocking things going on that just wouldn't have been done in the past, and workmanship is generally I've found shoddier. I've had to go in and redo wiring in a family members brand new half million pound house because not only was it barely functional they hadn't even taken basic effort to mark up and properly route the wiring. Some of the newer circuit breakers also basically kill off powerline as an option unless it's all one ring main.

I've got plenty of experience with these myself as I said and not had the issues you describe, generally they work or they don't and I've never had one fail through overheating. I do though always check it under load, if the heats excessive I just switch what is on the plug, generally though when I install them as I said the router is on one end and the other is usually restricted to a TV or sky box which aren't big power draws(unless it's an old plasma). I have seen no real difference in failure rates between passthrough and not passthrough, the only common denominator is I've always put them in for people and told them what to do with them. I also take the time to troubleshoot bad signal strength, generally if it doesn't come up with full speed on the same ring I disconnect everything, check it and then start putting stuff back in until the culprit is found. Like all things in life, extra effort is worth it.

I've never ran 2kw through one, that's frankly excessive. I have ran 1.2kw off one myself for half a decade, but that's just one unit and its full surge protected on the other side. That being said straight up heat also won't kill one unless it is extreme i.e. cause a fire extreme. You can kill them though with unstable power, they are very sensitive to surges in power as you would expect. As I said I would never set them up with that much load though, most I've put through one for someone else is 500W for a TV and a games console.
smckirdy10/08/2020 10:52

Absolutely had issues with new homes, older ones tended to work better …Absolutely had issues with new homes, older ones tended to work better actually. With new homes there are some pretty shocking things going on that just wouldn't have been done in the past, and workmanship is generally I've found shoddier. I've had to go in and redo wiring in a family members brand new half million pound house because not only was it barely functional they hadn't even taken basic effort to mark up and properly route the wiring. Some of the newer circuit breakers also basically kill off powerline as an option unless it's all one ring main. I've got plenty of experience with these myself as I said and not had the issues you describe, generally they work or they don't and I've never had one fail through overheating. I do though always check it under load, if the heats excessive I just switch what is on the plug, generally though when I install them as I said the router is on one end and the other is usually restricted to a TV or sky box which aren't big power draws(unless it's an old plasma). I have seen no real difference in failure rates between passthrough and not passthrough, the only common denominator is I've always put them in for people and told them what to do with them. I also take the time to troubleshoot bad signal strength, generally if it doesn't come up with full speed on the same ring I disconnect everything, check it and then start putting stuff back in until the culprit is found. Like all things in life, extra effort is worth it.I've never ran 2kw through one, that's frankly excessive. I have ran 1.2kw off one myself for half a decade, but that's just one unit and its full surge protected on the other side. That being said straight up heat also won't kill one unless it is extreme i.e. cause a fire extreme. You can kill them though with unstable power, they are very sensitive to surges in power as you would expect. As I said I would never set them up with that much load though, most I've put through one for someone else is 500W for a TV and a games console.


I beg to differ.

Having discussed at length with the manufacturers directly.

But....you are, as ever, entitled to your opinion.

I'm guessing you're not referring to the 1800mbps or 2gbps powerline adapters, but referring to much lower speed ones. Would be interesting to know.
BingoBertie10/08/2020 11:04

I beg to differ.Having discussed at length with the manufacturers …I beg to differ.Having discussed at length with the manufacturers directly.But....you are, as ever, entitled to your opinion.I'm guessing you're not referring to the 1800mbps or 2gbps powerline adapters, but referring to much lower speed ones. Would be interesting to know.


The 1800 and 2gbps ones are a nonsense, most people don't have home networks that would support those speeds to begin with as gigabit isn't even fully standard on routers and even my very nearly top of the line pc only has 2.5gbps network and I never need it.

Generally I always buy whatever is the best spec available gigabit unit. Generally after taking the time to install properly I get it up to about 80% of that which is plenty for any use case in the home.
smckirdy10/08/2020 11:10

The 1800 and 2gbps ones are a nonsense, most people don't have home …The 1800 and 2gbps ones are a nonsense, most people don't have home networks that would support those speeds to begin with as gigabit isn't even fully standard on routers and even my very nearly top of the line pc only has 2.5gbps network and I never need it.Generally I always buy whatever is the best spec available gigabit unit. Generally after taking the time to install properly I get it up to about 80% of that which is plenty for any use case in the home.


There you go then.....different league!

As peoples homes get more automated, broadband supplied to homes will need to be more than 100mbps, therefore to future proof, a sensible option is to as youve rightly said buy the best tech at the time, rather than buy now & buy again in 6 months or so.

Each to their own.
BingoBertie10/08/2020 11:18

There you go then.....different league!As peoples homes get more …There you go then.....different league!As peoples homes get more automated, broadband supplied to homes will need to be more than 100mbps, therefore to future proof, a sensible option is to as youve rightly said buy the best tech at the time, rather than buy now & buy again in 6 months or so.Each to their own.



Yes, buying the cutting edge usually means buying the problems with it. We've had gigabit power line adaptors for something like a decade on the market, so you are buying a product several generations down the line. For things like networking hardware unless the new stuff is genuinely innovative(like the new arm driven routers) second to to last is way better.

100mbps is definitely not enough, as a rule of thumb whatever your maximum WAN speed is should be your minimum LAN speed. For me 500mbps is usually the minimum I accept on a LAN, which is fast enough for basically any use case including 4k streaming, if I can get more than that it's nice, but not essential. To be honest with modern homes it is less about total speed, but about reliability and ensuring your core infrastructure is on a wired backbone.

For all the problems of powerline sometimes it beats a mesh network by a country mile, I hate setting those things up and troubleshooting them.
Bubbles_Jones10/08/2020 08:52

It doesn't matter if you have full fibre, these adapters will be affected …It doesn't matter if you have full fibre, these adapters will be affected by the quality of your electrical cabling. I'm imagining a long mains extension out to a shed may not be optimal.


My neighbour has the same issues, our properties were flooded some time ago and are running brand new systems. The pass through is connected via underground armoured cable over a 25m distance. We received them for free from our provider Karoo. The fly in the ointment is the bridge from a ring to a radial connection via the consumer unit.
smckirdy10/08/2020 08:36

I've had a gigabit set for over 5 years and never had an issue in multiple …I've had a gigabit set for over 5 years and never had an issue in multiple homes. Generally I find you get what you pay for, there are cheap ones that are frankly rubbish, but tp-links at least mid range and up never seem to have an issue.It's not the plugs that are the issue. A lot of countries use lower mains voltage and you need to design for counties with higher, which cheap crappy ones don't do and hence why they aren't sold in the UK as electrical safety is one of the better regulated areas.Common sense? They're designed to pass through so they can handle pretty much anything you plug in as they aren't doing anything direct with that power. Have drawn well over 1.2 KW on the regular through them for a long time and had no issues.If you have drop outs it's possible it's your powerline itself. They are pretty clever and increasingly will work where they wouldn't before, but if you aren't on the same ring or at the furthest extreme of distance they don't work very well. If it has to go through a breaker between the access points it's not reliable at all.


I can run my oven rated at 2kw over my ring circuit under regs, however, I choose not to. Running a drier, washer etc on the pass through maybe okay but there are reports out there that they’re struggling with U.K. systems.
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