This deal was published more than 2 weeks ago and may no longer be available.
TP-Link LS1008G 8-Port Desktop/Wallmount Gigabit Ethernet Switch, £13.47 / £17.96 Non Prime at Amazon
530°

TP-Link LS1008G 8-Port Desktop/Wallmount Gigabit Ethernet Switch, £13.47 / £17.96 Non Prime at Amazon

£13.47£1510%Amazon Deals
Expert (Beta)21
Expert (Beta)
Posted 1st May
Now in stock, good price for an excellent switch.

3453953.jpgKEY FEATURES
  • 8x Gigabit ports
  • Unmanaged switch
  • Plastic housing
  • 16Gbps switching capacity
  • Plug and play design
  • Fanless design ensures quiet operation
  • Green Ethernet technology saves power
  • LS1008G
Community Updates

Groups

Top comments
ct900101/05/2020 12:45

I bought one the last time it was on offer. It's not the best switch. It …I bought one the last time it was on offer. It's not the best switch. It was really slow and in the end I swapped it out for a Netgear.


Switches don't just slow things down unless it's genuinely faulty. It's likely your device(/s) connected to the switch did not auto-negotiate at 1000Mbps correctly.
21 Comments
Technically OOS until May 7th

Have one of these - decent switch. Mounted on back of TV cabinet with 2 of those sticky 'velcro' style picture hanger things that are easy to remove
I bought one the last time it was on offer. It's not the best switch. It was really slow and in the end I swapped it out for a Netgear.
ct900101/05/2020 12:45

I bought one the last time it was on offer. It's not the best switch. It …I bought one the last time it was on offer. It's not the best switch. It was really slow and in the end I swapped it out for a Netgear.


Switches don't just slow things down unless it's genuinely faulty. It's likely your device(/s) connected to the switch did not auto-negotiate at 1000Mbps correctly.
had this switch but had some issues i couldnt pinpoint.. switched to a Netgear GS308 and much happier.. cant say for certain the tp-link was faulty and generally like their products, but the netgear has much better reviews on amazon and the extra weight of a metal switch is handy to keep it in place so thicker cat 6/7 cables dont lift it of the surface its on
Yea I would personally go for the Netgear ones than these plastic fantastic things.
I had a Netgear 4+4 and managed to fry my relatively new Samsung tv. Luckily motherboards are available on Ebay so I managed to fix it relatively easily. I changed to TP-Link and its been ok so far. I guess you can get the odd duff switch irrespective of manufacturer.
Ben240201/05/2020 13:21

Switches don't just slow things down unless it's genuinely faulty. It's …Switches don't just slow things down unless it's genuinely faulty. It's likely your device(/s) connected to the switch did not auto-negotiate at 1000Mbps correctly.


WHAT HE SAID! Drives me mad this new common design where there is only a single colour LED that denotes connectivity and flashes for activity, no longer do the manufaturers use dual colour LED's to signify orange 100Mbit and Green 1Gbit. I have a D-link that has dual colour LED's and it periodically decides to not connect at 1 Gbit but atleast I know and I can then cycle the power on the switches to get it to connect at the full 1Gbit....
The 5 port version only uses 5v, does anyone know of a usb adapter to power this thing?
I want to strap it behind the TV and HTPC and power it from the HTPC rear usb port since they are always on.... Any ideas?
DingIs01/05/2020 18:09

The 5 port version only uses 5v, does anyone know of a usb adapter to …The 5 port version only uses 5v, does anyone know of a usb adapter to power this thing?I want to strap it behind the TV and HTPC and power it from the HTPC rear usb port since they are always on.... Any ideas?


Sounds like a good idea and you will be wanting something like this, but you will need to confirm the connector type used on the switch

amazon.co.uk/dp/…s_2
Edited by: "Lexeus" 1st May
Sorry, I hate asking entry level questions about things I'm a novice at. But if I have a powerline adapter, can I plug all my AV and computer stuff into this box,and then the box into the powerline?
Lexeus01/05/2020 18:25

Sounds like a good idea and you will be wanting something like this, but …Sounds like a good idea and you will be wanting something like this, but you will need to confirm the connector type used on the switchhttps://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B003MQO96U/ref=dp_prsubs_2


Aha! Yes, how silly of me... Actually I reckon I might have some old USB to Nokia type cables in the Man Drawer... They'd probably be fine since it's purely 5v and 0.6a for the 5 port version..
Just need to get the main PC up and running again when the new NIC arrives.. the onboard one has screwed up and is giving 169.xx addresses...
TelicVet01/05/2020 18:53

Sorry, I hate asking entry level questions about things I'm a novice at. …Sorry, I hate asking entry level questions about things I'm a novice at. But if I have a powerline adapter, can I plug all my AV and computer stuff into this box,and then the box into the powerline?


I can't see any reason why not... The powerline is just replacing a network cable...
TelicVet01/05/2020 18:53

Sorry, I hate asking entry level questions about things I'm a novice at. …Sorry, I hate asking entry level questions about things I'm a novice at. But if I have a powerline adapter, can I plug all my AV and computer stuff into this box,and then the box into the powerline?


Yes. You can plug as many switches into each other as you like, the ethernet ports on these boxes are auto-sensing and will work out what they are plugged into themselves, so any port can be connected to a PC or other network switch.

This is an 8 port switch, it is made of two 5port boards connected by one port on each being soldered together, leaving 8 ports available. The same is true of a powerline adapter, just think of the powerline connection part as another PC and it must still plug it's ethernet cable into a network switch. This is why a common version of a Powerline adapter is a Powerline connection + WiFi access point + two ethernet ports; it is made of a traditional 4 port ethernet switch but two of the ports are in use (one for the Wifi Access point + one for the Powerline connection) therefore leaving you with two ports for external use.
Edited by: "Lexeus" 2nd May
Lexeus02/05/2020 08:35

Yes. You can plug as many switched into each other as you like, the …Yes. You can plug as many switched into each other as you like, the ethernet ports on these boxes are auto-sensing and will work out what they are plugged into themselves, so any port can be connected to a PC or other network switch. This is an 8 port switch, it is made of two 5port boards connected by one port on each being soldered together, leaving 8 ports available. The same is true of a powerline adapter, just think of the powerline connection part as another PC and it must still plug it's ethernet cable into a network switch. This is why a common version of a Powerline adapter is a Powerline connection + WiFi access point + two ethernet ports; it is made of a traditional 4 port ethernet switch but two of the ports are in use (one for the Wifi Access point + one for the Powerline connection) therefore leaving you with two ports for external use.


Thank you so much, I'll probably go for the 5 port one then as 8 is way above what I need.
Got the 5 port superb small compact does the job
TelicVet02/05/2020 08:36

Thank you so much, I'll probably go for the 5 port one then as 8 is way …Thank you so much, I'll probably go for the 5 port one then as 8 is way above what I need.



Serious for the few quid difference - get the 8.

I was going to get a 5 for behind the telly - got the 8 and its full - you need to minus 1 for the 'feed' cable into it. So the 5 is really 4 and the 8 really 7.

I have a 5 coming off the 8 to serve the wife's 'home office' and to allow the kids onto laptops. On our 8, I have the 'feed' cable, telly, PC, xbox, 2 laptops, a 5 on a long cable somewhere else in the room and a 'spare' long cable for extra odds n bods.

I was quite amazed how quickly it filled up. I ended up buying an extra 3 5s for work purposes (restreaming team laptops) that will be re-sited to bedrooms when freed up. That way the kids TV's can be wired rather than wireless.

It makes a heck of a difference to how your broadband/fibre copes if you move lots of stuff to wired - now only our phones are wireless and we can all be working away happily with netflix or spotify going as well and no-one get any problems.
Edited by: "pontyslapper" 2nd May
pontyslapper02/05/2020 10:23

Serious for the few quid difference - get the 8.I was going to get a 5 for …Serious for the few quid difference - get the 8.I was going to get a 5 for behind the telly - got the 8 and its full - you need to minus 1 for the 'feed' cable into it. So the 5 is really 4 and the 8 really 7.I have a 5 coming off the 8 to serve the wife's 'home office' and to allow the kids onto laptops. On our 8, I have the 'feed' cable, telly, PC, xbox, 2 laptops, a 5 on a long cable somewhere else in the room and a 'spare' long cable for extra odds n bods.I was quite amazed how quickly it filled up. I ended up buying an extra 3 5s for work purposes (restreaming team laptops) that will be re-sited to bedrooms when freed up. That way the kids TV's can be wired rather than wireless.It makes a heck of a difference to how your broadband/fibre copes if you move lots of stuff to wired - now only our phones are wireless and we can all be working away happily with netflix or spotify going as well and no-one get any problems.


Ahh cheers I appreciate that, but I've got the PC, PS4, youview box, and TV there, so that would be perfect.
I still find it a bit ott that people need these in their houses. I get you can use it as a "5 into 1"kind of thing if your equipment is nowhere near your router, but how people fill up 8/16 port switches in their house I just can't get my head around unless people like running network cables to everything in their house that can use one
Edited by: "Ad86" 2nd May
Ad8602/05/2020 11:40

I still find it a bit ott that people need these in their houses. I get …I still find it a bit ott that people need these in their houses. I get you can use it as a "5 into 1"kind of thing if your equipment is nowhere near your router, but how people fill up 8/16 port switches in their house I just can't get my head around unless people like running network cables to everything in their house that can use one



you can never have too many network devices plugged into Ethernet networks, but you can soon encounter problems when relying on WiFi connections for everything...
pontyslapper02/05/2020 10:23

Serious for the few quid difference - get the 8.I was going to get a 5 for …Serious for the few quid difference - get the 8.I was going to get a 5 for behind the telly - got the 8 and its full - you need to minus 1 for the 'feed' cable into it. So the 5 is really 4 and the 8 really 7.I have a 5 coming off the 8 to serve the wife's 'home office' and to allow the kids onto laptops. On our 8, I have the 'feed' cable, telly, PC, xbox, 2 laptops, a 5 on a long cable somewhere else in the room and a 'spare' long cable for extra odds n bods.I was quite amazed how quickly it filled up. I ended up buying an extra 3 5s for work purposes (restreaming team laptops) that will be re-sited to bedrooms when freed up. That way the kids TV's can be wired rather than wireless.It makes a heck of a difference to how your broadband/fibre copes if you move lots of stuff to wired - now only our phones are wireless and we can all be working away happily with netflix or spotify going as well and no-one get any problems.


I agree. I agonised over a 5 or an 8 a couple of months back when an old 8 port blew its capacitors and I didn’t see the point in replacing it with a new 8 because half the ports had fallen out of use. In the end I went with the 5 and now I am kicking my self because I need an 8 port for something...

Atlewst these days they are 5port and not the old 4+uplink so if you have to hook two together it is only the extra power socket that you lose.
Edited by: "Lexeus" 2nd May
Ad8602/05/2020 11:40

I still find it a bit ott that people need these in their houses. I get …I still find it a bit ott that people need these in their houses. I get you can use it as a "5 into 1"kind of thing if your equipment is nowhere near your router, but how people fill up 8/16 port switches in their house I just can't get my head around unless people like running network cables to everything in their house that can use one


you find it laughable that people use the best and most reliable approach to installing something?! If you're happy to use wifi for everything go ahead, but don't comment on devices you have zero knowledge on the usefulness of.
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text