TP-LINK MC100CM 10/100M RJ45 to 100M Full-Duplex Multi-Mode SC Fiber Converter £26.46  @ Amazon
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TP-LINK MC100CM 10/100M RJ45 to 100M Full-Duplex Multi-Mode SC Fiber Converter £26.46 @ Amazon

88
Found 30th Jun 2017
This is the cheapest price I think for the duplex model.
Well revued (from a small number of reviewers).
You could probably pay a lot for a 'professional' model
You would normally need two of course
Just received mine includes a 'lifetime warranty' shades of the old 3com!
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Delio79

Although a techie, this seems quite a specialist product which I don't … Although a techie, this seems quite a specialist product which I don't see an immediate need for nor remotely understand.


Trust me, you're not a techie
Edited by: "Adult" 30th Jun 2017
Delio79

Although a techie, this seems quite a specialist product which I don't … Although a techie, this seems quite a specialist product which I don't see an immediate need for nor remotely understand. As a result I don't feel I'm in a position to vote either way and would urge readers to refrain from voting if they don't really understand what they're voting for.


This box converts between bog standard copper ethernet and fibre optic cables. That's all you need to know about how it works. As for why you'd get one, the answer is probably range. Read on for more depth.

(warning: dodgy physics ahead)
Remember the days of ADSL? When the speed of your connection depended on how far away you were from the telephone exchange? Ever wondered why? Well, it's a capacitance thing, the longer the cable the greater the amount of charge required before its voltage changes.

It's similar to a water pipe that's normally filled with air. If you put some water in one end of a 10cm pipe you really don't need much water before it fills the pipe and starts coming out the other end. If your pipe is 1km long you need a lot of water before it fills the pipe and comes out the other end. If we had more water flowing into the pipe then it would take less time for water to start flowing out the other end.

Back to ADSL, your modem has a tiny power supply and it must use that to change the voltage of the cable back to the telephone exchange, if the cable is 10 metres that task doesn't take long. If it's 10km it takes a very long time. If one voltage-change is one bit, then you can transfer more bits per second with a shorter cable.

This applies to HDMI, USB, ethernet, anything that transfers data through copper by the way. Those things all have a fixed speed they have to reach and limited power to do it with, so say your 10m HDMI cable is too long for your DVD player to make it oscillate at 340MHz, well you can't transfer 1080p video then!

To get around this we use a different medium, fibre optic. You don't need to continuously shine a light into fibre optic to 'charge' the entire cable, you can just send a pulse and it'll keep bouncing its way through the cable until it comes out the other end. Suddenly the length of the cable doesn't matter, you can generate a signal on one end that's as fast as you like and it'll come out perfectly on the other end, so that 10 metre HDMI cable can now be 10km without issue. In fact 340MHz is easy, with fibre you can do signals on the order of 300 terahertz (half the carrier speed, carrier is red light).

There are some other advantages at scale, for instance in a datacentre there are a lot (100+ per 2 x 2 metre square) ethernet links and they're all running at higher than 1 gigabit speeds, so the power spent making signals on cables oscillate and spent overcoming the resistance of cables is significant. We're talking 2-5W per link here, increasing with distance. With fibre we need under 1W for any distance.

TL;DR fibre optic has uses in high speed, long distance, low power applications or any combination thereof.
Edited by: "CampGareth" 30th Jun 2017
Seriously...!?
All you had to say was, to do a home networking for longer runs of cables one can use fibre cabling instead of CAT5/6/7 whatever's available then use one of the above devices to convert the fibre ends to normal rj45 connection sockets... simples..!
don't need to go in to history of the internet/intranet.
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deleted1032520
poundshopper

is this wireless?



Technically yes as it uses glass instead of wire oO
88 Comments
What about gigabit? 10gig?

I've been looking at wiring up my flat but hiding the cables in channels in the walls. Fibre optic's thinner so easier to hide, but it's also more flexible in that it can carry ethernet, hdmi, thunderbolt etc with capacity only limited by the media converters on either end.
Although a techie, this seems quite a specialist product which I don't see an immediate need for nor remotely understand. As a result I don't feel I'm in a position to vote either way and would urge readers to refrain from voting if they don't really understand what they're voting for.
Delio79

Although a techie, this seems quite a specialist product which I don't … Although a techie, this seems quite a specialist product which I don't see an immediate need for nor remotely understand.


Trust me, you're not a techie
Edited by: "Adult" 30th Jun 2017
CampGareth

What about gigabit? 10gig?I've been looking at wiring up my flat but … What about gigabit? 10gig?I've been looking at wiring up my flat but hiding the cables in channels in the walls. Fibre optic's thinner so easier to hide, but it's also more flexible in that it can carry ethernet, hdmi, thunderbolt etc with capacity only limited by the media converters on either end.


(And no electrical/rf interference).
Sorry this is only megabit I'm afraid.
I'm just extending a network to a security camera which is about 40 metres away. Beyond easy wi-fi. So this seems ideal. I'm also going to include a copper cable. If that doesn't work or slows down the whole network then it will be useful for alarms etc. In your case it may be worthwhile looking for some sort of fiber hub? If they exist at an economical price.
Delio7911 m ago

Although a techie, this seems quite a specialist product which I don't see …Although a techie, this seems quite a specialist product which I don't see an immediate need for nor remotely understand. As a result I don't feel I'm in a position to vote either way and would urge readers to refrain from voting if they don't really understand what they're voting for.

​would this increase the range compared to cat 5/6
zizzles

If I understand you correctly, you're saying vote cold on it. Done , … If I understand you correctly, you're saying vote cold on it. Done , thanks


I've added my reason for getting this.
People shouldn't in my opinion vote cold just because they don't understand what they're voting for. All that is necessary is a quick search. Just don't vote otherwise. Otherwise people will vote it down and others will never even look at it.
I get a bit tired of cold votes for no reason other than other people have given it cold votes. Sometimes something will get heat in the hundreds then when it is posted again later (at an even cheaper price) it will go into the hundreds minus (for no good reason)
flickflack

would this increase the range compared to cat 5/6



Yes CAT 5/6 is rated to 100 Meters.

Multimode fiber somewhere upto 2KM
Cheap for what it is! +1
Delio79

Although a techie, this seems quite a specialist product which I don't … Although a techie, this seems quite a specialist product which I don't see an immediate need for nor remotely understand. As a result I don't feel I'm in a position to vote either way and would urge readers to refrain from voting if they don't really understand what they're voting for.


This box converts between bog standard copper ethernet and fibre optic cables. That's all you need to know about how it works. As for why you'd get one, the answer is probably range. Read on for more depth.

(warning: dodgy physics ahead)
Remember the days of ADSL? When the speed of your connection depended on how far away you were from the telephone exchange? Ever wondered why? Well, it's a capacitance thing, the longer the cable the greater the amount of charge required before its voltage changes.

It's similar to a water pipe that's normally filled with air. If you put some water in one end of a 10cm pipe you really don't need much water before it fills the pipe and starts coming out the other end. If your pipe is 1km long you need a lot of water before it fills the pipe and comes out the other end. If we had more water flowing into the pipe then it would take less time for water to start flowing out the other end.

Back to ADSL, your modem has a tiny power supply and it must use that to change the voltage of the cable back to the telephone exchange, if the cable is 10 metres that task doesn't take long. If it's 10km it takes a very long time. If one voltage-change is one bit, then you can transfer more bits per second with a shorter cable.

This applies to HDMI, USB, ethernet, anything that transfers data through copper by the way. Those things all have a fixed speed they have to reach and limited power to do it with, so say your 10m HDMI cable is too long for your DVD player to make it oscillate at 340MHz, well you can't transfer 1080p video then!

To get around this we use a different medium, fibre optic. You don't need to continuously shine a light into fibre optic to 'charge' the entire cable, you can just send a pulse and it'll keep bouncing its way through the cable until it comes out the other end. Suddenly the length of the cable doesn't matter, you can generate a signal on one end that's as fast as you like and it'll come out perfectly on the other end, so that 10 metre HDMI cable can now be 10km without issue. In fact 340MHz is easy, with fibre you can do signals on the order of 300 terahertz (half the carrier speed, carrier is red light).

There are some other advantages at scale, for instance in a datacentre there are a lot (100+ per 2 x 2 metre square) ethernet links and they're all running at higher than 1 gigabit speeds, so the power spent making signals on cables oscillate and spent overcoming the resistance of cables is significant. We're talking 2-5W per link here, increasing with distance. With fibre we need under 1W for any distance.

TL;DR fibre optic has uses in high speed, long distance, low power applications or any combination thereof.
Edited by: "CampGareth" 30th Jun 2017
Seriously...!?
All you had to say was, to do a home networking for longer runs of cables one can use fibre cabling instead of CAT5/6/7 whatever's available then use one of the above devices to convert the fibre ends to normal rj45 connection sockets... simples..!
don't need to go in to history of the internet/intranet.
jasee1 h, 53 m ago

I've added my reason for getting this.People shouldn't in my opinion vote …I've added my reason for getting this.People shouldn't in my opinion vote cold just because they don't understand what they're voting for. All that is necessary is a quick search. Just don't vote otherwise. Otherwise people will vote it down and others will never even look at it. I get a bit tired of cold votes for no reason other than other people have given it cold votes. Sometimes something will get heat in the hundreds then when it is posted again later (at an even cheaper price) it will go into the hundreds minus (for no good reason)

​That's exactly what I was trying to say above. don't vote if you don't understand what you're voting for -likely you'll be unnecessarily voting cold for what could be a good deal!
speed0071 h, 2 m ago

Seriously...!? All you had to say was, to do a home networking for longer …Seriously...!? All you had to say was, to do a home networking for longer runs of cables one can use fibre cabling instead of CAT5/6/7 whatever's available then use one of the above devices to convert the fibre ends to normal rj45 connection sockets... simples..! don't need to go in to history of the internet/intranet.


Thanks speed007... I know what the device does just by reading the deal title, but couldn't think what this could be used for, nor how much is the usually going rate for such a device. You've enlightened me on the use case, so thanks for that!
Unless you're going through highly explosive gas or an electrically charged environment why would you need this ? Plus unless your switch supports this you would require two of these units. Trying to route the head of that connector through a tight space would be a nightmare on its own.
kester76

Unless you're going through highly explosive gas or an electrically … Unless you're going through highly explosive gas or an electrically charged environment why would you need this ? Plus unless your switch supports this you would require two of these units. Trying to route the head of that connector through a tight space would be a nightmare on its own.


If this is directed at me? Of course you need two. And I'm basically going through an open field and I like the idea of no interference. Are you serious about routing in a tight space? Of course the connector is quite large, no larger than an rj45, but you only need to thread one through at the time. I'm actually going to run copper alongside so it'll be interesting to compare the two.
Also, the copper is solid, so I normally route it through junction boxes. This may be a disadvantage in this long run.
Edited by: "jasee" 30th Jun 2017
speed007

Seriously...!?All you had to say was, to do a home networking for longer … Seriously...!?All you had to say was, to do a home networking for longer runs of cables one can use fibre cabling instead of CAT5/6/7 whatever's available then use one of the above devices to convert the fibre ends to normal rj45 connection sockets... simples..!don't need to go in to history of the internet/intranet.


That was the first sentence, then there was a 'skip if you like'. Dude said he didn't understand the product, well now he definitely does. What it is, why it exists. Needs a little more than "copper is bad because stuff"
Edited by: "CampGareth" 30th Jun 2017
jasee

If this is directed at me? Of course you need two. And I'm basically … If this is directed at me? Of course you need two. And I'm basically going through an open field and I like the idea of no interference. Are you serious about routing in a tight space? Of course the connector is quite large, no larger than an rj45, but you only need to thread one through at the time. I'm actually going to run copper alongside so it'll be interesting to compare the two.


Not aimed directly but just in general as someone might just buy one thinking they come as a pair and when routing rj45 you don't have the connector on the end so it's a lot smaller A good quality external shielded cat 6 cable should be fine whilst outside over a reasonable distance as 100mbit is easily achievable.

Connection wise I'm looking at infiniband tech on ebay as the cheap 10-40Gbit connections seem incredible at the price but cable length is pretty poor per £ but it's 40GBit
kester76

Not aimed directly but just in general as someone might just buy one … Not aimed directly but just in general as someone might just buy one thinking they come as a pair and when routing rj45 you don't have the connector on the end so it's a lot smaller A good quality external shielded cat 6 cable should be fine whilst outside over a reasonable distance as 100mbit is easily achievable.Connection wise I'm looking at infiniband tech on ebay as the cheap 10-40Gbit connections seem incredible at the price but cable length is pretty poor per £ but it's 40GBit


I've got cat 5 unshielded. 50 metres of fiber is £12 on Ebay. Plus it's probably less vulnerable to physical damage. I'll probably put the lot in a hose pipe if I can get them in. I don't need gigabit. So I can't see why I would need infiniband, it's probably got proprietary conectors. KISS
jasee

I've got cat 5 unshielded. 50 metres of fiber is £12 on Ebay. Plus it's … I've got cat 5 unshielded. 50 metres of fiber is £12 on Ebay. Plus it's probably less vulnerable to physical damage. I'll probably put the lot in a hose pipe if I can get them in. I don't need gigabit. So I can't see why I would need infiniband, it's probably got proprietary conectors. KISS



True 40gbit is nuts as bandwidth wise the fastest m.2 drives can't get near that and even ram disks top around 10GB/s.
kester761 h, 42 m ago

True 40gbit is nuts as bandwidth wise the fastest m.2 drives can't get …True 40gbit is nuts as bandwidth wise the fastest m.2 drives can't get near that and even ram disks top around 10GB/s.


You can buy single SSDs that can read at 48Gbs and that's before you start thinking of RAID.
These are enterprise drives and obviously not M.2.
Edited by: "Agharta" 30th Jun 2017
CampGareth

What about gigabit? 10gig?I've been looking at wiring up my flat but … What about gigabit? 10gig?I've been looking at wiring up my flat but hiding the cables in channels in the walls. Fibre optic's thinner so easier to hide, but it's also more flexible in that it can carry ethernet, hdmi, thunderbolt etc with capacity only limited by the media converters on either end.



I run 10Gb fibre in my house(have a 10Gb switch for a backbone) - but at the moment only where necessary, which basically means PCs that need good NAS access.

10Gb fibre is cheap, the cards (like refurbed Mellanox on US eBay are cheap(use the cheap Global Shipping Programme)), coming in around $15-20 each, transceivers say £15-20 each. The issue is really with switches - a 24 SFP+ port Quanta LB6M will run you £200-300 from eBay(and you may want to put quiet fans in - it's enterprise). The LB4Ms have a couple of 10Gb ports and are under £100 - or if you just have a few machines to link you can do point-to-point 10Gb cards.

Edited by: "hukdplan" 30th Jun 2017
jasee

50 metres of fiber is £12 on Ebay.


Seems cheap - Link ?
mikerr

Seems cheap - Link ?


It is only OM3 but it should do for me
ebay.co.uk/itm…198
CampGareth5 h, 33 m ago

That was the first sentence, then there was a 'skip if you like'. Dude …That was the first sentence, then there was a 'skip if you like'. Dude said he didn't understand the product, well now he definitely does. What it is, why it exists. Needs a little more than "copper is bad because stuff"

you have time at your hand, man..!
Delio79

Although a techie, this seems quite a specialist product which I don't … Although a techie, this seems quite a specialist product which I don't see an immediate need for nor remotely understand. As a result I don't feel I'm in a position to vote either way and would urge readers to refrain from voting if they don't really understand what they're voting for.


You not voting based if you understand the product or not. Is the product cheaper else where?

- If not then vote hot.
- If yes, hen vote cold and provide link or post deal to cheaper deal.
CampGareth

What about gigabit? 10gig?I've been looking at wiring up my flat but … What about gigabit? 10gig?I've been looking at wiring up my flat but hiding the cables in channels in the walls. Fibre optic's thinner so easier to hide, but it's also more flexible in that it can carry ethernet, hdmi, thunderbolt etc with capacity only limited by the media converters on either end.



Forgot to mention this if you need to hide cable - D-line trunking, cheap and easy to use.

Edited by: "hukdplan" 1st Jul 2017
is this wireless?
mikerr

Seems cheap - Link ?


That's what it does, yes
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deleted1032520
flickflack

would this increase the range compared to cat 5/6



That's the main usage for these as it can take ethernet beyond the 100m copper range.
poundshopper

is this wireless?



I'm going to assume you're not joking. The "wire" is the whole point of this device - it converts an electrical signal (from a copper cable) to an optical signal (through optic fibre) and vice versa.

Edited by: "phishwak" 1st Jul 2017
Avatar
deleted1032520
hukdplan

I run 10Gb fibre in my house(have a 10Gb switch for a backbone) - but at … I run 10Gb fibre in my house(have a 10Gb switch for a backbone) - but at the moment only where necessary, which basically means PCs that need good NAS access. 10Gb fibre is cheap, the cards (like refurbed Mellanox on US eBay are cheap(use the cheap Global Shipping Programme)), coming in around $15-20 each, transceivers say £15-20 each. The issue is really with switches - a 24 SFP+ port Quanta LB6M will run you £200-300 from eBay(and you may want to put quiet fans in - it's enterprise). The LB4Ms have a couple of 10Gb ports and are under £100 - or if you just have a few machines to link you can do point-to-point 10Gb cards.



Not being funny but that's incredible overkill in a home environment.
I work in an enterprise environment with over 6,000 users across 4 sites. We only have a 10gb fibre as a link to our data warehouse.
It will be costing you a fortune in electricity too. Our fibre data switches and servers use a lot of power, I recently had to upgrade the UPS in there with a 40Kva unit.
The Quanta LB6M uses around 130w alone.
Edited by: "deleted1032520" 1st Jul 2017
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deleted1032520
poundshopper

is this wireless?



Technically yes as it uses glass instead of wire oO
Avatar
deleted1032520
CampGareth

What about gigabit? 10gig?I've been looking at wiring up my flat but … What about gigabit? 10gig?I've been looking at wiring up my flat but hiding the cables in channels in the walls. Fibre optic's thinner so easier to hide, but it's also more flexible in that it can carry ethernet, hdmi, thunderbolt etc with capacity only limited by the media converters on either end.



I'd advise against unless you are determined and/or rich.
Unless using pre-made patch leads then you will need an expensive fibre splice tool. Not only that, fibre media converters are needed at each end that require power and are expensive.
Cat5 or 6 will do everything you require (Inc Hdmi) for much less money and you will also be able to easily terminate into decorative faceplates so will be more aesthetically pleasing.
I'm so glad this got hot.
Avatar
deleted1032520
Optimus_Toaster

I'm so glad this got hot.



Price is misleading though as you normally buy in pairs.

Shame it's not 10/100/1000.


OrribleHarry

Technically yes as it uses glass instead of wire oO



What? If an optical cable used glass fibre it would crack as soon as you move it. They use plastic fibre.

hukdplan

I run 10Gb fibre in my house(have a 10Gb switch for a backbone) - but at … I run 10Gb fibre in my house(have a 10Gb switch for a backbone) - but at the moment only where necessary, which basically means PCs that need good NAS access. 10Gb fibre is cheap, the cards (like refurbed Mellanox on US eBay are cheap(use the cheap Global Shipping Programme)), coming in around $15-20 each, transceivers say £15-20 each. The issue is really with switches - a 24 SFP+ port Quanta LB6M will run you £200-300 from eBay(and you may want to put quiet fans in - it's enterprise). The LB4Ms have a couple of 10Gb ports and are under £100 - or if you just have a few machines to link you can do point-to-point 10Gb cards.



Would you mind sharing what your use case is? I'm really curious now!
paulpso

Shame it's not 10/100/1000.What? If an optical cable used glass fibre it … Shame it's not 10/100/1000.What? If an optical cable used glass fibre it would crack as soon as you move it. They use plastic fibre.


They do use glass, or glass resins.
Avatar
deleted1032520
paulpso

Shame it's not 10/100/1000.What? If an optical cable used glass fibre it … Shame it's not 10/100/1000.What? If an optical cable used glass fibre it would crack as soon as you move it. They use plastic fibre.



Rubbish! It's 9um thick so flexible enough although they have a maximum bending radius.
Only Xmas trees are plastic fibres.
bluenotesmiley

They do use glass, or glass resins.



Flexible glass? ...We've gone too far...
OrribleHarry

Rubbish! It's 9um thick so flexible enough although they have a maximum … Rubbish! It's 9um thick so flexible enough although they have a maximum bending radius. Only Xmas trees are plastic fibres.



Only Christmas trees? So a cheap TOSLINK cable is glass?
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