TP-LINK TL-PA411KIT AV500 Powerline Adapter Kit - Twin Pack @ Currys & PC World - £19.99
469°Expired

TP-LINK TL-PA411KIT AV500 Powerline Adapter Kit - Twin Pack @ Currys & PC World - £19.99

46
Found 5th Jul 2016
Now down to £19.99 with free delivery, or click and collect.
Community Updates

Groups

46 Comments
looks good, ordered cheers OP
I'd wait for the first comment deriding the lack of gigabit ports but as I'm using one of these myself (and they are extremely reliable) I may have to wait a long while...
Edited by: "CharlesCalthrop" 5th Jul 2016
I've got 4 of these running in my house and never had a problem with them. Good price.
Can someone explain to me the advantage of using these?
Is this instead of connecting over wireless, you can plug 1 upstairs, 1 downstairs, and connect via ethernet?
Does interference play much of a part?
dave_2245

Can someone explain to me the advantage of using these? Is this instead … Can someone explain to me the advantage of using these? Is this instead of connecting over wireless, you can plug 1 upstairs, 1 downstairs, and connect via ethernet?Does interference play much of a part?



this is wireless without the need for wires. plug one into your router, the other where you want in your house and that unit will give you wifi. so get a couple of these and you should have wifi in all of your house.
ive got a devolo unit but getting additional units are more expensive so might by these as buying additional units is more cheaper.
EN1GMA

this is wireless without the need for wires. plug one into your router, … this is wireless without the need for wires. plug one into your router, the other where you want in your house and that unit will give you wifi. so get a couple of these and you should have wifi in all of your house.



These DO NOT give you wifi.
same price on Amazon
dave_2245

Can someone explain to me the advantage of using these? Is this instead … Can someone explain to me the advantage of using these? Is this instead of connecting over wireless, you can plug 1 upstairs, 1 downstairs, and connect via ethernet?Does interference play much of a part?



If you can't run a CAT cable between your PC/Router then these are preferred over WiFi option.
These use the powerline to transfer connection over high frequency on the electric cables.

These TP-Link devices are based on Qualcomm Atheros AR1500/AR7400 chipset.

Some users may experience regular or infrequent drop outs and reconnections on the Qualcomm based products.

My personal recommendation is on devices based on Broadcom chipsets.
Such as the ZyXEL PLA5206KIT based on Broadcom's BCM60333 chipset
ebuyer.com/662…01f

Edited by: "Shock" 5th Jul 2016
EN1GMA

this is wireless without the need for wires. plug one into your router, … this is wireless without the need for wires. plug one into your router, the other where you want in your house and that unit will give you wifi. so get a couple of these and you should have wifi in all of your house.




Fair enough, i think i understand, however i'd point out that they don't give wifi, they give you an ethernet port to plug into.
Im more curious at how much their connection speed can deteriorate.
If i place it on the other side of the house, would they be similar speeds to a wifi connection?
EN1GMA

this is wireless without the need for wires. plug one into your router, … this is wireless without the need for wires. plug one into your router, the other where you want in your house and that unit will give you wifi. so get a couple of these and you should have wifi in all of your house.



This is not what they do at all!!

These allow you have another wired device somewhere else in the house (or use a switch there too for more ports)
EN1GMA

this is wireless without the need for wires. plug one into your router, … this is wireless without the need for wires. plug one into your router, the other where you want in your house and that unit will give you wifi. so get a couple of these and you should have wifi in all of your house.



Honestly, if you don't know how something works, stay quiet and don't confuse others or read the description before you share your knowledge. Some might think you're an expert or something
It uses wired connection, no wifi connectivity over this particular kit is possible. These are a brilliant idea if for example your router is away from your pc and you want a stable, wired connection.
nomnomnomnom

This is not what they do at all!!These allow you have another wired … This is not what they do at all!!These allow you have another wired device somewhere else in the house (or use a switch there too for more ports)



This is what you need to extend your wifi. Got 2 of these and thay are very good
currys.co.uk/gbu…tml?intcmpid=display~RR
Avatar
deleted793389
dave_2245

Does interference play much of a part? Im more curious at how much their … Does interference play much of a part? Im more curious at how much their connection speed can deteriorate. If i place it on the other side of the house, would they be similar speeds to a wifi connection?



It's mostly down to the quality and length of the electrical wiring in your house. These transmit over the power lines, and automatically negotiate speeds based on the signal quality. If you have long runs of wiring, naturally the quality will degrade over distance as this is using your internal copper wire.
It's perfectly suitable in nearly all circumstances though, and unless you have very bad wiring or a very electrically noisy appliance on the same ring main it will do what it says on the tin.
As for comparing to WiFi, that depends on what revision of WiFi you are using. Wireless AC is much faster, but again the signal still attenuates through walls, floors and the atmosphere and is of course just as susceptible to electromagnetic interference from other appliances etc.
For £20 these are great though.
dave_2245

Fair enough, i think i understand, however i'd point out that they don't … Fair enough, i think i understand, however i'd point out that they don't give wifi, they give you an ethernet port to plug into. Im more curious at how much their connection speed can deteriorate. If i place it on the other side of the house, would they be similar speeds to a wifi connection?



Basically the use the internal wiring in your house to create a network.

However you normally have two rings in most houses, upstairs/downstairs for instance so you can get some connection problems at times if you have a powerline plugged in upstairs and your router/other connection is downstairs for instance.

All networks will deteriorate over distance so depends on the size of your house/flat etc, however you will find you won't even come close to the quoted speed. But you will probably still find them quicker than wireless.

I personally have never had any luck with the tp-links in my house, router downstairs, my pc upstairs, I always had frequent disconnections. However I moved to Edimax and no problems. But I expect as always different situations and setups will render different results.
apologies guys, thought this was a wifi unit. so this is wired connection only?
Pankratz

Honestly, if you don't know how something works, stay quiet and don't … Honestly, if you don't know how something works, stay quiet and don't confuse others or read the description before you share your knowledge. Some might think you're an expert or something :(It uses wired connection, no wifi connectivity over this particular kit is possible. These are a brilliant idea if for example your router is away from your pc and you want a stable, wired connection.


ok bud, keep your knickers on. the premises is the same except I made the mistake in thinking it was wireless as opposed to wired.
nomnomnomnom

This is not what they do at all!!These allow you have another wired … This is not what they do at all!!These allow you have another wired device somewhere else in the house (or use a switch there too for more ports)



so how do these wired ones connect to the modem/router? do you attach one of the units to the modem/router and the other you plug in elsewhere to get the wired connection?

ive got devolo one which has wired and wifi built in. so the smaller unit plugs into the virgin superhub and the larger unit is placed upstairs to give the wifi signal and Ethernet connection.
dave_2245

Can someone explain to me the advantage of using these? Is this instead … Can someone explain to me the advantage of using these? Is this instead of connecting over wireless, you can plug 1 upstairs, 1 downstairs, and connect via ethernet?Does interference play much of a part?



sorry for the confusion dave.
EN1GMA

so how do these wired ones connect to the modem/router? do you attach one … so how do these wired ones connect to the modem/router? do you attach one of the units to the modem/router and the other you plug in elsewhere to get the wired connection?ive got devolo one which has wired and wifi built in. so the smaller unit plugs into the virgin superhub and the larger unit is placed upstairs to give the wifi signal and Ethernet connection.



Wired ones just connect with a standard network cable to the router. And then you have another powerline elsewhere for whatever you want to connect to it.

My setup is :
1 x Powerline connected to the router.
1 x Powerline connected to my PC
1 x Powerline connected to my sons xbox one
1 x Powerline connected to my daughters PC
1 x Powerline connected downstairs via a hub to the Sky box/Blu Ray/TV and Steam Link.

Edited by: "Jonj1611" 5th Jul 2016
Recently bought another pair. Had the previous one last me 2 years and then suddenly decided not to switch on anymore. But these are great and good price, paid the same a few months ago.
I've had Powerlines for years, and got these a month ago.

In common with my previous units (a Belkin and a TRENDnet), they occasionally lose connection in my flat - random dropouts that will either fix themselves after a minute or two, or requires one or both units to be power cycled.

These dropped out two or 3 times a day. However, running a continuous ping in the background fixes the issue - no dropouts since I started the ping 3 weeks or so ago.

Good 'standard' price, just 40p more than I paid from Flubit last month...
EN1GMA

sorry for the confusion dave.




Don't worry buddy, i knew what you meant
Jonj1611

Wired ones just connect with a standard network cable to the router. And … Wired ones just connect with a standard network cable to the router. And then you have another powerline elsewhere for whatever you want to connect to it.My setup is :1 x Powerline connected to the router.1 x Powerline connected to my PC1 x Powerline connected to my sons xbox one1 x Powerline connected to my daughters PC1 x Powerline connected downstairs via a hub to the Sky box/Blu Ray/TV and Steam Link.


Ah, so not much different to my devolo set up. One plugs with the router, and then the other units you can place where you want for the connection.
dave_2245

Can someone explain to me the advantage of using these? Is this instead … Can someone explain to me the advantage of using these? Is this instead of connecting over wireless, you can plug 1 upstairs, 1 downstairs, and connect via ethernet?Does interference play much of a part?


Much better for gaming and video streaming than wireless.
Edited by: "retrend" 5th Jul 2016
EN1GMA

this is wireless without the need for wires. plug one into your router, … this is wireless without the need for wires. plug one into your router, the other where you want in your house and that unit will give you wifi. so get a couple of these and you should have wifi in all of your house.



Quite the opposite - this is very much wired.
@dave_2245 it's like tunneling Ethernet network over PLC (power-line communication). You put one into the power socket next to your router (or core switch), second on the first floor (next to the place where you need Ethernet socket (uplink to your router/switch), then, say, third on the attic and fourth in the garage. Please do not put any filters/surge protectors between them - it might ruin the performance.
(please note: it's strongly advised to do initial setup/synchronisation beforehand)

Now after you connect Ethernet cable from your router/core switch to the first device, you "extend" this connection to the other connected powerline adapters - thus letting yourself to connect, say, IP camera in the garage or additional wifi AP in the office in the attic. Unfortunately those adapters do not "extend" wifi on their own.

Kind of like this:
http://f.tqn.com/y/compnetworking/1/S/r/_/powerline-diagram-1.jpg
techno12

I've had Powerlines for years, and got these a month ago.In common with … I've had Powerlines for years, and got these a month ago.In common with my previous units (a Belkin and a TRENDnet), they occasionally lose connection in my flat - random dropouts that will either fix themselves after a minute or two, or requires one or both units to be power cycled.These dropped out two or 3 times a day. However, running a continuous ping in the background fixes the issue - no dropouts since I started the ping 3 weeks or so ago.Good 'standard' price, just 40p more than I paid from Flubit last month...



I have explained this in post above (post 9).
It seems to be an issue with Qualcomm chips..
I have 5 of these. They are perfect. Unlike others these Work through extention leads too.
Shock

I have explained this in post above (post 9).It seems to be an issue with … I have explained this in post above (post 9).It seems to be an issue with Qualcomm chips..



Not just Qualcomm chips - my Belkins used a Gigle chipset and suffered similar dropouts.

Irrelevant anyway as pinging fixes it.... but when I next upgrade I'll look out for Broadcom ones (will only need to upgrade the powerlines if I end up getting a new broadband connection which is faster than my current 76Meg fibre)

Edited by: "techno12" 5th Jul 2016
Any reason not to buy this model?
Has an extra port for only a few £ extra, or would it be better to buy the OP's model and a switch for extra ports?

amazon.co.uk/TP-…ink
I have these set up - x4 in total around the house. They are very reliable. No issues so far. The reason I went for TP-Link ones was that they use less electricity than the other models I compared them against.
Edited by: "SuperFlyBlues" 5th Jul 2016
I have 5 powerline adapters - but I prefer paying the extra to get a pass-through version so I don't waste a socket. The pass- through allow you to plug the powerline direct to the socket - then run a an extension cable from that with extra sockets.

PS - I have noticed that pass-through versions have become more expensive recently.
Edited by: "Dave_dave69" 5th Jul 2016
I have these, pretty good and reliable
Bought today, they work awesome. I was iffy at first but now I'm totally sold.
Simple plug one into your router and the other in another plug (into the wall) and boom. Buy now.
There are more expensive ones but unless your house is ridiculously massive then u have nothing to worry bout.
sorry if i sound thick but can these be used to save running a coax cable from my main arial on the roof that feeds tv in the living room to receive BBC ,ITV etc in my bedroom? also can they be used to get sky in bedroom ?
EN1GMA

ok bud, keep your knickers on. the premises is the same except I made the … ok bud, keep your knickers on. the premises is the same except I made the mistake in thinking it was wireless as opposed to wired.



You made the mistake of posting your mistake on a forum,thereby giving it some credibilty to the less well informed.

so knickers,pants,thongs etc etc are entitled to be taken off,with complete fools like you around.

susanne30

sorry if i sound thick but can these be used to save running a coax cable … sorry if i sound thick but can these be used to save running a coax cable from my main arial on the roof that feeds tv in the living room to receive BBC ,ITV etc in my bedroom? also can they be used to get sky in bedroom ?



No
Thomablue

You made the mistake of posting your mistake on a forum,thereby giving it … You made the mistake of posting your mistake on a forum,thereby giving it some credibilty to the less well informed.so knickers,pants,thongs etc etc are entitled to be taken off,with complete fools like you around.


Sorry Ms perfect for making a genuine mistake. Oh sorry, you're a nobody on a shopping forum. I'm sure I won't lose any sleep over your comment. Jeez, guy makes a genuine mistake and people get high and mighty.
Edited by: "EN1GMA" 5th Jul 2016
judgepd

I've got 4 of these running in my house and never had a problem with … I've got 4 of these running in my house and never had a problem with them. Good price.



Yes, I have them, fantastic.
EN1GMA

Sorry Ms perfect for making a genuine mistake. Oh sorry, you're a nobody … Sorry Ms perfect for making a genuine mistake. Oh sorry, you're a nobody on a shopping forum. I'm sure I won't lose any sleep over your comment. Jeez, guy makes a genuine mistake and people get high and mighty.



These work more or less identically to your 'wifi ones' - save for the fact that the WiFi ones, unsurprisingly, have an additional WiFi chip in one of the receivers. It then uses the 'wired' connection to supply network connectivity to the 'wireless' adapter inside the powerline.

These models do not provide wireless, but the wifi ones works in exactly the same way as if you had plugged a WAP in to the Ethernet port of one of the receivers on this model (but you get an extra Ethernet port )
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text