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Triban RC500 Flat Bar Disc Road Bike - Sora £499.99 Decathlon
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Triban RC500 Flat Bar Disc Road Bike - Sora £499.99 Decathlon

22
Posted 13th Feb

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10.7kg weight without pedals

Dependable, versatile and comfortable, the Triban RC500 road bike, with flat handlebars and disc braking, is a hybrid bike that’s suitable for riding on both roads and country paths. Key features include comfort road geometry, Shimano Sora R3000 groupset, effective mechanical disc brakes and a comfy ErgoFit saddle.
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Was £529.99 (£30 reduction)

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22 Comments
Dunno how people ride these, I have Pot Holes the size of Moon Craters all around me.
Frame New Triban Evo frame in 6061 T6 aluminium, comfort-oriented geometry with adapted sloping
Weight: 1780g in size M
Strong, versatile frame: can be fitted with a mudguard and pannier rack
Compatible with tyres up to 36mm cross-section

Fork New Triban Evo fork with carbon blades and aluminium 1"1/8 Aheadset steerer tube. This fork combines comfort, low weight, and precision.
Compatible with tyres up to 36mm cross-section

Handlebar / stem / steering Ergonomic aluminium flat handlebars for a better grip, excellent comfort and ease of use.
Handlebar width (axle-to-axle):
XS / S / M : 560mm. L / XL: 600mm.
Reversible stem (+7° / -7°):

Drivetrain Shimano Sora R3000 shifters
Shimano Sora R3000 front derailleur
Shimano Sora R3000 9-speed long screed rear derailleur

Crankset / cassette Microshift CS-H092 9V 11/32 cassette
(11/13/15/17/19/21/24/28/32).
Shimano Sora R3000 compact bottom bracket in 50/34.

Brakes Promax DSK-300R disc brakes.
160mm disc brakes at front and rear
JAGWIRE anti-compression hosing to ensure braking precision and efficiency
Semi-metal pad

Wheels Triban Tubeless ready* wheels
6063T6 aluminium
ETRTO dimensions: 622 x 17 C
28mm high for greater lateral rigidity
Crossed steel spokes for improved rigidity (28 front and 28 rear)

Tyres Triban Resist+ tyres
410g
Skinwall stiff bead
1mm nylon anti-puncture protection
Durable carcass: 55 TPI.
Dimensions: 28c-622 / 700 x 28c for greater comfort

Saddle / Seat post New Triban ErgoFit saddle.
Hammock design for greater comfort. Aluminium Triban seat post. Easy saddle adjustment.
Diameter: 27.2mm.
Length: 350mm in M / L / XL, 250mm in XS / S

Pedals Platform pedals supplied with the bike

See this bike in action! Our Triban bikes have already gone on many adventures! Discover our Triban stories on triban.exposure.co/

Weight XS: 10.7 kg
S: 10.7 kg
M: 10.7 kg
L: 10.7 kg
XL: 10.7 kg
Weight without pedals
That seat does not look comfortable at all!!
Pic is not of flat bar bike
Wrong bike header pic.
the picture is RC 520.
Sorry fixed the pic.
slannmage13/02/2020 07:50

Dunno how people ride these, I have Pot Holes the size of Moon Craters all …Dunno how people ride these, I have Pot Holes the size of Moon Craters all around me.



Good point. A while back I bought a similar-type bike (Merida Speeder 500, also flat-bar with discs), hoping to do both commuting and exercising with a single bike. The local roads are honestly not friendly to skinny tires and the ride is rather "rattly" for a commute, and for exercise I would rather ride a proper road bike with drop bars. YMMV.
As ever with Decathlon very decent bike for the money but they have the lowest weight limits of any brand with a total load of 100kg for most of their bikes some competitors go up to 160kg total load. Take away the bike weight, fitted accessories, luggage, riders clothes etc and you could be down to 80-85kg which is the average weight of a man in the UK. If you overload a bike beyond its certified weight limits it normally won't fail immediately but instead you increase the fatigue rate which means you will limit the number of years the frame will last, maybe 3 years instead of 15. For CF forks its much harder to predict failure because the quality of CF forks varies a lot as they are manufactured by hand, hugely overloading them could mean instant failure though. So not the ideal brand for heavier riders getting back into cycling.

decathlon.co.uk/ecu…pdf
SharkSandwich13/02/2020 10:08

Good point. A while back I bought a similar-type bike (Merida Speeder 500, …Good point. A while back I bought a similar-type bike (Merida Speeder 500, also flat-bar with discs), hoping to do both commuting and exercising with a single bike. The local roads are honestly not friendly to skinny tires and the ride is rather "rattly" for a commute, and for exercise I would rather ride a proper road bike with drop bars. YMMV.


I thought that road bikes had skinnier tyres and that hybrid bikes were more suitable to dodgy roads?
No hydraulic brakes and not 29er wheels.
SharkSandwich13/02/2020 10:08

Good point. A while back I bought a similar-type bike (Merida Speeder 500, …Good point. A while back I bought a similar-type bike (Merida Speeder 500, also flat-bar with discs), hoping to do both commuting and exercising with a single bike. The local roads are honestly not friendly to skinny tires and the ride is rather "rattly" for a commute, and for exercise I would rather ride a proper road bike with drop bars. YMMV.


For exercise you should ride the heaviest bike with the least number of gears you can manage.
Poor deal, no excuse for cable disc brakes on a ~£500 flat bar bike instead of hydraulic disc brakes, the Voodoo Marasa was £320 again recently in a Halfords sale. I'd pick hydraulic disc brakes over ~2Kg supplied weight and an extra cassette sprocket everytime.
BigTool4U13/02/2020 12:50

I thought that road bikes had skinnier tyres and that hybrid bikes were …I thought that road bikes had skinnier tyres and that hybrid bikes were more suitable to dodgy roads?


Depends on the individual bike. Hybrids cover quite a wide range, some are far closer to the road bike end of the spectrum, others are closer to mountain bikes.
N0bodyOfTheGoat14/02/2020 07:59

Poor deal, no excuse for cable disc brakes on a ~£500 flat bar bike …Poor deal, no excuse for cable disc brakes on a ~£500 flat bar bike instead of hydraulic disc brakes, the Voodoo Marasa was £320 again recently in a Halfords sale. I'd pick hydraulic disc brakes over ~2Kg supplied weight and an extra cassette sprocket everytime.


I wouldn't consider brakes to be the most important factor on a road bike. In reality most people would be perfectly fine with rim brakes.

The Triban is better than the Marasa in various other ways: better groupset, better frame, better forks.

For what you get, the Triban is far from a poor deal. Infact it's a good deal even at non-sale prices. I wonder why anyone would choose the flat bar version of this bike, since the drop bar version is already designed for comfort, but either way you get a lot of bike for the money.
Edited by: "ktrizzle" 14th Feb
kramer208813/02/2020 23:26

For exercise you should ride the heaviest bike with the least number of …For exercise you should ride the heaviest bike with the least number of gears you can manage.


No that limits you to effectively just one method of training, If doing for exercise and most benefit you should really be aiming to mix up the methods available to you which will make the exercise more effective.
kramer208813/02/2020 23:26

For exercise you should ride the heaviest bike with the least number of …For exercise you should ride the heaviest bike with the least number of gears you can manage.


With the best health insurance you can afford...

What and how you ride depends surely on your goals and any limitations. Always best to gradually increase intensity when exercising.
ktrizzle14/02/2020 17:38

I wouldn't consider brakes to be the most important factor on a road bike. …I wouldn't consider brakes to be the most important factor on a road bike. In reality most people would be perfectly fine with rim brakes.The Triban is better than the Marasa in various other ways: better groupset, better frame, better forks.For what you get, the Triban is far from a poor deal. Infact it's a good deal even at non-sale prices. I wonder why anyone would choose the flat bar version of this bike, since the drop bar version is already designed for comfort, but either way you get a lot of bike for the money.


I'm unsure about what criteria you are using for claiming the Triban is better but the Voodoo seems to be a hybrid bike based on mainly mountain bike components where as the Triban is a hybrid bike based on mainly road bike components. The Voodoo is a much stronger bike capable of more abuse and better off-road where as the Triban is a lighter bike for lighter duty use. I wouldn't of thought it was clear cut which is better as that would depend on the rider and how he/she wants to use the bike. Safety would be something the Voodoo excels over the Triban, much stronger frame and forks, much stronger wheels, 60kg greater total load capacity, superior hydraulic brakes although personally for a hybrid bike I think mechanical disc brakes are fine and easier to maintain but you can't argue against the superior stopping power of hydraulic brakes.
bonzobanana14/02/2020 18:18

I'm unsure about what criteria you are using for claiming the Triban is …I'm unsure about what criteria you are using for claiming the Triban is better but the Voodoo seems to be a hybrid bike based on mainly mountain bike components where as the Triban is a hybrid bike based on mainly road bike components. The Voodoo is a much stronger bike capable of more abuse and better off-road where as the Triban is a lighter bike for lighter duty use. I wouldn't of thought it was clear cut which is better as that would depend on the rider and how he/she wants to use the bike. Safety would be something the Voodoo excels over the Triban, much stronger frame and forks, much stronger wheels, 60kg greater total load capacity, superior hydraulic brakes although personally for a hybrid bike I think mechanical disc brakes are fine and easier to maintain but you can't argue against the superior stopping power of hydraulic brakes.


I agree that they're different bikes for different purposes so difficult to compare.

But certainly in terms of the groupset - the Triban has the mid-range Sora whereas the Voodoo has the entry level Altus so the Triban is clearly better. I would argue the weight limit on the frame is a non-issue for most cyclists so doesn't really detract from the safety of the bike.

I wasn't really trying to compare the two bikes, I was just giving my opinion that the Triban is not a "poor deal" as they other person claimed.
ktrizzle14/02/2020 19:53

I agree that they're different bikes for different purposes so difficult …I agree that they're different bikes for different purposes so difficult to compare.But certainly in terms of the groupset - the Triban has the mid-range Sora whereas the Voodoo has the entry level Altus so the Triban is clearly better. I would argue the weight limit on the frame is a non-issue for most cyclists so doesn't really detract from the safety of the bike.I wasn't really trying to compare the two bikes, I was just giving my opinion that the Triban is not a "poor deal" as they other person claimed.


I wouldn't call Sora mid range but its one groupset I guess over Altus as its Tourney>Claris>Sora for road bikes but Tourney>Altus for mountain bikes but Altus by its very nature is a mountain bike groupset so should be more durable and capable of dealing with mud better etc. So you could make the case that Altus is better than Sora for a hybrid bike that is going to be used off road plus the Voodoo Marasa has a triple chainset so has a wider range of gears so will be easier up hills etc. However as I said before the very fact they are using different types of groupsets shows they aren't aiming for the same market. The Triban is definitely much more of a road bike in construction with very light hybrid functionality and the Marasa is much more capable off-road and a stronger, heavier bike.

The issue of the weight limit of the bike is a huge issue if you are over the limit or plan to load the bike up with additional weight, i.e. light touring etc. I totally accept that if you weigh 60kg its a non-issue though. However considering the average weight of a uk man is about 82kg which is close to the maximum rider weight of the bike I think its important to be mentioned. Decathlon have had a lot of frame recalls due to failures more than most companies. I don't think Halfords have had any frame or fork recalls unlike Decathlon despite having a huge slice of the UK market, as much as 40% of bike sales by volume. There were some Boardman bikes recalled but that was a poorly fitted brake caliper not failures of the frame. A typical Halfords bike has a 60% greater load capacity 100kg vs 160kg. So generally a Halfords bike is a much safer bike, frames and forks are stronger, wheels have a higher spoke count etc. Halfords bikes meet the suggested maximum weight limits of the EN standard like many other brands like Giant, Specialised, Trek etc. That's why I think its always important to mention the low weight limits of Decathlon bikes, it isn't clearly shown when you visit Decathlon or on their site but the limits are clearly stated in the documentation when you receive the bike. Many cyclists don't care how Decathlon have achieved lower bike weights but its important to cyclists above the average weight.
Where does the carrera subway 1 fit in the debate?
BigTool4U15/02/2020 11:02

Where does the carrera subway 1 fit in the debate?


The Carrera Subway is a rigid mountain bike that is sold as a hybrid bike. It's pretty much all mountain bike parts including 27.5" wheels its probably represents the most versatile bike you can buy as its pretty good in all areas. It's the opposite to the Triban in that it is incredibly strong so ideal for heavier riders looking to get back into cycling. You then have its stronger mountain bike frame being utilised mainly for its extra strength for heavier riders. You could say the Marasa was between the Triban and Subway both in weight and overall strength. The Marasa is not a full on mountain bike like the Subway. You can also fit suspension forks to the subway so you could quickly configure it as a hardtail if going fully off-road and then refit the rigid forks for commuting etc. However saying that rigid forks are still usable off road, the techniques are different when riding and you wouldn't go as fast over the more technical bits but still capable of using such trails.
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