Triple QX 5w-40 5L Fully synthetic £13.85 (with code) @ EurocarParts
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Triple QX 5w-40 5L Fully synthetic £13.85 (with code) @ EurocarParts

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Found 26th Sep 2017Edited by:"MonkeysUncle"
Back again for the end of the month.
Use code crazy75 for this price.
Free delivery too.
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Heat added - thank you. Decent oil - have used it for quite a few years.
Good time to do a oil change in the autumn then your ready for the winter cold starts.
I've used it for ages too and seems good.
Thanks
Good price
Good find OP but unfortunately not VW 505.01 for my car.
Good price. I'll be servicing my car this weekend then! Thanks OP
rabb5it3 h, 0 m ago

Good find OP but unfortunately not VW 505.01 for my car.



The pd spec oil is £18.89 with code. Dunno what the going price is for it as i don't use it
Heat added, I've been using this for years too in my Smart for regular changes. She now has 160K on the clock and still pulling!
Is this ok for turbo diesel?
rabb5it7 h, 48 m ago

Good find OP but unfortunately not VW 505.01 for my car.


Call your local TPS, they are currenty selling 5L of Platinum 5w40 for around £13. For a few quid more you get the Longlife III
Depends if its a vw / audi diesel, most need the VW 505.01 spec. I believe if its got a DPF its better to get the .01 spec
Someone correct me if I'm wrong.

Otherwise 5w 40 is recommended for diesels. Check your handbook.
It's a cheap oil, but absolutely fine. Clean cheap oil is always better than dirty expensive oil. In other words better to change your oil more frequently with cheap stuff rather than keep expensive stuff in there longer. Don't worry too much about the specs. This will be fine in VW/Audi cars. Unless you are using your car on a track day then this oil will be just fine.
Just had a look at the specs of this oil... If it's a diesel 2017 car then API-FA4 is the standard it needs to meet. This oil only goes to API CF so it's NOT suitable for diesels before 1994. For petrol engines it's all good and meets the latest standards (API SN).
Diesels are more fussy. It's really more about meeting emissions standards, but if you have a modern diesel engine best not to risk it. As previous poster mentioned probably not good for your DPF. It will work fine, but may emit more particulates and therefore clog up the DPF quicker.
Whatever your car is, you should follow the manufacturer's recommendation. Many high performance and diesel engined cars require very specific oil, for example because of DPF filters and catalytic converters amongst other reasons.

Fortunately, Euro Carparts has a page where you can enter your vehicle registration to find the specific oil that your engine requires.

Here's the link: eurocarparts.com/eng…ils

Many BMW, Mini and Peugeot petrol engines should NOT be given this oil.
woodbino3 h, 49 m ago

It's a cheap oil, but absolutely fine. Clean cheap oil is always better …It's a cheap oil, but absolutely fine. Clean cheap oil is always better than dirty expensive oil. In other words better to change your oil more frequently with cheap stuff rather than keep expensive stuff in there longer. Don't worry too much about the specs. This will be fine in VW/Audi cars. Unless you are using your car on a track day then this oil will be just fine.


You're talking garbage. There are a vast number of engines used by VW/Audi/Skoda/Seat petrols and diesels.This will NOT confirm to manufacturers recommendations for very many cars. Your track day comment is just pricelessly uninformed.

You can just stick any oil in if you want but if you value your car you'll only use the right oil. Would you get a VW dealer to service your car and ask them to put any cheap oil in to save money? Do you think they would?
MonkeysUncle23 h, 0 m ago

Depends if its a vw / audi diesel, most need the VW 505.01 spec. I believe …Depends if its a vw / audi diesel, most need the VW 505.01 spec. I believe if its got a DPF its better to get the .01 specSomeone correct me if I'm wrong.Otherwise 5w 40 is recommended for diesels. Check your handbook.


There is confusion among advice for VW group diesels, even the dealer has beek known to use the wrong oil.
To summarise:

For pre DPF use 505.01 even for long life oil changes, it is a better oil, comes in 5W 30, and 5W40 B4.

The actual oil recommended by VW for the PD engines is 506.01 - 0W 30 - B5, the above all contain additives such as zinc etc to help protect cam lobe, injector lobe wear. I use 505.01 5W 40 in my 200,000 mile Pumpe Düse (PD) TDI engine.

For DPF diesels from about 2007, 507.00 B3 is necessary, the oil is not so slippy -B3 but it has the additives removed that are harmful to the DPF.
Edited by: "rabb5it" 28th Sep 2017
smiler0328th Sep

You're talking garbage. There are a vast number of engines used by …You're talking garbage. There are a vast number of engines used by VW/Audi/Skoda/Seat petrols and diesels.This will NOT confirm to manufacturers recommendations for very many cars. Your track day comment is just pricelessly uninformed.You can just stick any oil in if you want but if you value your car you'll only use the right oil. Would you get a VW dealer to service your car and ask them to put any cheap oil in to save money? Do you think they would?


Firstly, I wouldn't get a VW dealer to service my car. They charge £150 just for an oil and filter change which is ridiculous. This is not representative of the cost of the oil they use. They charge a fortune, but provide you with a lovely receptionist at the front desk, a nice place to sit whilst you wait for your repairs, maybe a courtesy car, and tasty coffee from a bean-to-cup machine. These things are not free.

This oil is of the highest grade as set by the American Petroleum Institute and it's European counterpart, ACEA. For petrol and turbo petrol cars for everyday driving this will be good. Do you think there is something special or magical about VAG engines? Nope. Very few car manufacturers set their own standards, and when they do it's to ensure they pass the ever stringent European emissions standards, which get tougher every year. If their cars fail, they can not sell their cars on the European market. Many cars/engines have been pulled out of sale because of failing to meet these standards. My beloved Mazda RX8 is one example. That crazy rotary engine just could not be made any cleaner. All the Japanese car manufacturers require oils that perform to the highest API/ACEA standards including high performance engines from Honda and Mitsubishi. The oils with VW group specs don't have anything else special in them. All modern fully synthetic oils that meet the highest API/ACEA grades have similar additives.

I remember when I had a Volvo with the lovely (but thirsty) 5 cylinder turbocharged 2.3 engine, the oil spec changed one year. I asked why, and this was because it offered better economy and emissions, but actually offered less protection to the engine. The engine itself was exactly the same.

With regards to track days; when making engines, car manufacturers balance performance with emissions, economy and reliability. As customers or users of these cars we sometimes want a different balance. When I take my car on a track day, I change my oil to a race spec Motul or Fuchs brand with a very high viscosity. This is what my engine builder recommends. This offers my engine the best protection when I'm revving the s**t out of it, at the expense of emissions.

Now modern diesel engines are fussier. However, a lot of the oil spec. recommendations are to reduce emissions. It doesn't necessarily mean the engine is better protected.

By the way, I'm not talking garbage, I'm a chemist and have chemical engineering friends who work in the oil industry. I often annoy them with questions or this nature. I'm also a car nut and have experience of engine building. You are right though, you won't go wrong if you stick to the manufacturers recommendations, but don't always think they are prescribed to maximise longevity of your beloved car. If you are in the know, it's okay to venture outside of their direction to achieve other goals.

Think of this: there are many car servicing franchises out there (HiQ, Kwik Fit, Chemix etc.) who will offer you servicing at far lower prices than the dealership. Do you think they have 10+ different oil types with different viscosities and specifications in their garage? No, they usually have large barrels of 4 or 5 or so. Most decent garages will fill your car with the highest grade from an okay brand. They will do this without invalidating your warranty. These companies are not stupid (for the most part) and would not risk the financial burden of screwing up people's cars in this way. Indeed, filling your car with an oil with specifications different from the manufacturers does not invalidate your warranty as such. Only if the fault is related to the oil change (or they can prove it is such) will they not honour the repair bills. This was thanks to European consumer law that came into being over 10 years ago. However to be safe I would rather still to the manufacturers recommendations whilst the car was in warranty.

Okay, so I think I've droned on enough. In summary I think for most people it's best to stick with the recommendation in your manual, especially if in warranty. Even more so as actually you can find pretty decent oil for not much more with some internet searching. I do think though it's never good value or even any better to get servicing done by the franchised dealerships. There are plenty of independent specialist who will offer a better service for half the price. For the majority of cars (petrol) including VAG group cars, for normal driving conditions, any decent oil of the highest/latest API/ACEA grade is okay.
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