Turbo Fan Cooled Arc Welder current range 55-160 amps  £34.99 Aldi Thurs 27th
231°Expired

Turbo Fan Cooled Arc Welder current range 55-160 amps £34.99 Aldi Thurs 27th

£34.99ALDI Deals
48
Found 22nd Oct 2011
Not sure if this is a good deal.

Adjustable welding current range 55-160 amps
Input voltage: 230V/50Hz
Electrode sizes: 1.6-4mm
Input capacity: 8kW
Thermal overload protection
Earth clamp
Electrode holder
Power leads
Hand held face shield
Chipping hammer/wire brush
10 assorted electrodes

aldi.co.uk/uk/…htm

Arc Welding Electrodes
£3. 99 per pack
90 piece assorted pack
25 x Ø 1.6 x 300mm
25 x Ø 2.0 x 350mm
25 x Ø 2.5 x 350mm
10 x Ø 3.2 x 350mm
5 x Ø 4.0 x 350mm
Mild steel flux coated

48 Comments

Banned

What do you plug that into then?

^
The Mains aka Any Domestic Power Outlet.

YouDontWantToKnow

What do you plug that into then?



Trick question?

nvm: zomg beat me
Edited by: "Darwa" 22nd Oct 2011

Banned

zomg

^ The Mains aka Any Domestic Power Outlet.





Input capacity: 8kW


Just dont boil a kettle when you are using it.




Edited by: "YouDontWantToKnow" 22nd Oct 2011

seems cheap enough , anyone used this one from aldi ?

Good offer and ideal for all those DIY jobs like car repars.

I have one. Blows fuse in plug every few sticks. Also melted socket. Apart from that still works fantastic... Apparently using a 240volt three pin connector (like 110v) would solve my fuse prob. Need to keep mine under 120amps.

I have one of these and you need a 16 Amp connection for it to plug into. So not the easiest to connect up. Extension leads are usualy only 13Amp max so if you buy one be prepared for this challenge

cb-uk

Good offer and ideal for all those DIY jobs like car repars.


For car repairs this is too heavy, you would burn through the sheet, better with a MIG welder

Theres no chance that model is anywhere near 8kw at normal use.

Ive had a few over the years and run fine off a 13amp plug for intermittant use. The 13amp fuse will pop before anything melts if your welding current is set too high for to long.
If your running one of these off an extension make sure its fully unreeled as that majorly reduces current capacity and it WILL melt the cable!

If it was 8kw you would need a dedicated 32amp supply wired in 6mm or 10mm from main board with a blue 32amp industrial socket at the end. ebay.co.uk/itm…355 and then you would put a 32amp plug on welder.

Good for small amount of welding/DIY welding but nothing more.

I expect the duty cycle is fairly low hence at full current the fuse blows if welding for a few sticks, so it not for long periods of welding.

Normal price for a decent MMA welding set would be around £250-300 with a duty cycle of 60% so this is very good value if you need to do a small amount of welding.

Edited by: "maid020279" 23rd Oct 2011

So .... how many of you are going to buy one of these .. not because you need one, but because it's a great deal? :P



(edited to add a smiley in case someone thought I was being serious)
Edited by: "owencutaja" 23rd Oct 2011

brian9

I have one. Blows fuse in plug every few sticks. Also melted socket. … I have one. Blows fuse in plug every few sticks. Also melted socket. Apart from that still works fantastic... Apparently using a 240volt three pin connector (like 110v) would solve my fuse prob. Need to keep mine under 120amps.


Be careful doing this as if you fit such a plug and socket in your house. You wont blow the fuse in the plug (as it doesn't have one) but the only protection from faults will be an internal fuse in the welder (if it has one) and the trip in your house which may be rated to 32A. So this thing could melt before that trip worked.

Would look lovely on the garage shelf......

owencutaja

So .... how many of you are going to buy one of these .. not because you … So .... how many of you are going to buy one of these .. not because you need one, but because it's a great deal? :P(edited to add a smiley in case someone thought I was being serious)


Wow that seems a powerful welder for that money. Best easy wiring solution is a cooker socket I would of thought which I think is rated to 40A. That said many welders come with mains cable that don't look like it is capable of running anything close to their ampage. I guess the current draw is only for a short time. If you needed to an extension don't just use standard 13A cable perhaps use twin and earth cable with industrial connectors.

3 Year warranty too you can't go wrong.

Really these should be installed by a professional electrician or your house insurance will be invalid if it causes a fire.





With regards to electrical supply, I bought a MIG welder from Aldi, that came with a length of cable and a 13 amp plug. This was despite the instructions saying not to plug it into a standard domestic socket!!

Fortunately when I got my garage extension I asked the electrician to wire one of those blue sockets in, and it all works fine. But I do think it's naughty of Aldi to sell this sort of thing knowing that the rating is higher than a standard supply.

(Actually, just noticed bonzobanana also said the same about the supplied mains cable!)

With regards to the welder, it's a good price for an occasional welder. I prefer MIG rather than arc welding, but if this saves you a couple of hours labour on car repairs then it's paid for itself.

This would be ideal for diy jobs around the home. Obviously not up to industrial standards but for £35 its a no brainer.

Good for small jobs but don't try and weld all day with them, ie fabricating fences....will trip out. Bigger jobs like that will require something like an oil cooled machine like an Oxford.

You will also need some welding gloves and possibly some welding clamps depending on what you are going to weld.

Duty cycle appears to be 10%.

As there is no gas its good for welding outside in the wind.

Seems to be the same as a Silverline model.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Silverline-466888-160-Amp-Welder/dp/B000WTNYXY/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1319366888&sr=8-2

Manufacturer is Jiali in China.

It appears to have the case and main features of this model;

http://www.chinajiali.cn/product_detail.asp?id=30&url=%3Ca+class%3D%22tip%22+href%3D%22%3Ftype%3D3%22%3EWelding+Machines%3C%2Fa%3E%2D%3E%3Ca+class%3D%22tip%22+href%3D%22%3Ftype%3D18%22%3EMMA+ARC+Welding%3C%2Fa%3E&title=BX1%2D100B+MMA+ARC+Welding

but has the internal inverter of this model.

http://www.chinajiali.cn/product_detail.asp?id=34&url=%3Ca+class%3D%22tip%22+href%3D%22%3Ftype%3D3%22%3EWelding+Machines%3C%2Fa%3E%2D%3E%3Ca+class%3D%22tip%22+href%3D%22%3Ftype%3D18%22%3EMMA+ARC+Welding%3C%2Fa%3E&title=BX1%2D160E+MMA+ARC+Welding

They say it takes 6.2kw of power max but Jiali claim a 16A fuse as does Silverline but 6.2kw shared by 230 volts is close to 27amps.

Reviews for the Silverline model look positive.

Shame I haven't got a Aldi nearby.

goombahxxx

Good for small jobs but don't try and weld all day with them, ie … Good for small jobs but don't try and weld all day with them, ie fabricating fences....will trip out. Bigger jobs like that will require something like an oil cooled machine like an Oxford.



If it trips then it's time for a tea break.

Aldi repeats these deals on a regular basis once every few months. Good product if you can get it but as others say its for low frequency users (Just in the same way £10 paper shredders are no good for use in big offices!)

You need a mig welder for car bodies but a good old gas plant is still better all round

I've bought one before, used it, it's all right. Duty cycle is low, it will turn itself off after 1-2 minutes of welding and then you have to wait a few minutes. Plugged into the wall of the garage, it does blow 13A fuses and trips the circuit breaker every now and again. I had to stock up on a few fuses just in case but found that it's only really an issue if the electrode gets stuck to the piece and overloads the circuit. When you've got the knack for arc-welding, you'll do much better.

It's good for occasional welding jobs and the variable power was able to weld things from bicycle frames to bar stock steel. Buy the electrode pack as well because you will speed through electrodes just getting your eye in. And an angle grinder, for prepping the material for welding and to clean it up afterwards.

xfirebladex

And an angle grinder, for prepping the material for welding and to … And an angle grinder, for prepping the material for welding and to clean it up afterwards.



Amen to that, an angle grinder should be the second tool that a new welder should buy (after the welding rig itself!)

Although this is not recommended for welding cars can it still be done? (eg patching sills etc)

bonzobanana

Duty cycle appears to be 10%.

That sounds about right. At 8kW you would have about three time the power of a normal 13A plug, or 9 times the generated heat. So you can weld for a minute or two before the fuse burns out, and then you have to wait for things to cool down. A real stress test for your wiring, that's for sure.

Humm I am a little tempted. Asked local wrought iron gate maker for a quote just to put a few blobs here and there on some iron I had. Wanted £25 for it. Put off by the idea this may fry house electrics though

TOTAL BODGE ALERT!

Its a bodge I know but you could just limit the welder to 13A by using a mains plug and plugging it into one of those socket power meters like you get in Maplins. Start with the current dial on low and see how far you can get on the dial as you weld upto 13A then mark the dial at 13A and limit yourself to that. Another bodge is perhaps make a Y cable that takes the welder power cable and shares it between two different mains plugs so the load is shared. Obviously don't plug both into the same twin socket but plug them into 2 seperate locations. A normal ring mains is capable of 32 amps anyway and if you turn off as many other devices as possible especially electric fires and big kitchen appliances you should be able to keep it below 32A. I reckon its about 27A anyway and split between 2 its only 13.5A per socket.

I'm not advising anyone to do it of course its just theoretical.

It's meant for the European market, where their plugs are 16A.
Bit naughty of Aldi fitting them with 13A plugs for the UK.

If the input wattage is 8 kilowatts then the amps are actually close to 35A. 16A at 230V is only 3.7 kilowatts. Personally I think the model is 6.3kw which is close to 27A because I think its made by Jiali in China. Really though if Aldi are claiming it is 8kw input then it should be treated as a 35A device and wired accordingly even with a duty cycle of only 10%.

flang

Although this is not recommended for welding cars can it still be done? … Although this is not recommended for welding cars can it still be done? (eg patching sills etc)



Working with sheet metal is going to be very tricky with this. I wouldn't recommend it. You are likely to buckle and burn a hole through the job.
Edited by: "bigsky" 24th Oct 2011

bonzobanana

...If you needed to an extension don't just use standard 13A cable … ...If you needed to an extension don't just use standard 13A cable perhaps use twin and earth cable .......



No, no, no! Don't even think about it people; that's one of the most stupid suggestions on HUKD I have read for a while.

bigsky

No, no, no! Don't even think about it people; that's one of the most … No, no, no! Don't even think about it people; that's one of the most stupid suggestions on HUKD I have read for a while.



Normally people would follow up with a reason. So I guess using a standard 13A extension reel for a 8kwatt welder is your prefered option.

I have to agree with bonzobanana, while twin and earth isn't as flexible as a normal extension lead, I wouldn't have any issue using it in a semi-permanent 'trailing lead' situation. What is your reasoning bigsky?

Of course, I can't agree with bonzobanana's 'two way' connection, if you did that you would find when one was disconnected it was suddenly a 'live plug', which is horrendously dangerous!! That's one up from car keys in a socket!

good deal @£35! Heat added.

slimy31

I have to agree with bonzobanana, while twin and earth isn't as flexible … I have to agree with bonzobanana, while twin and earth isn't as flexible as a normal extension lead, I wouldn't have any issue using it in a semi-permanent 'trailing lead' situation. What is your reasoning bigsky?



Sorry, I thought this was obvious!

Solid core conductors should never be used where the wiring is going to be disturbed. The conductors can break when flexed; they are designed for fixed installations only. This is also the reason why tw&e should not be reused. A broken, or thinned conductor is a fire hazard. It's also a safety hazard as the earth conductor is thinner and can fail first. Please do not use twin and earth for extension leads, it is very dangerous. For more info I suggest you read The Wiring Regs (BS7671).

bonzobanana

.... So I guess using a standard 13A extension reel for a 8kwatt welder … .... So I guess using a standard 13A extension reel for a 8kwatt welder is your prefered option.



Your guess is wrong. I would use flex rated for the job.

slimy31

I have to agree with bonzobanana, while twin and earth isn't as flexible … I have to agree with bonzobanana, while twin and earth isn't as flexible as a normal extension lead, I wouldn't have any issue using it in a semi-permanent 'trailing lead' situation. What is your reasoning bigsky?Of course, I can't agree with bonzobanana's 'two way' connection, if you did that you would find when one was disconnected it was suddenly a 'live plug', which is horrendously dangerous!! That's one up from car keys in a socket!



I did say it was a terrible bodge though but yes it would need some discipline making sure both sockets were switched off before removing. It sounded a good idea when I wrote it. Oh well.

bigsky

Your guess is wrong. I would use flex rated for the job.



The fact remains many people buying a low cost welder aren't going to go for the professional approach of getting an electrician in to make a proper dedicated high current industrial connector in their garage and probably pay out 3 or 4 times as much as this welder costs in the first place with that and other accessories.

I take your point about twin and earth but I don't think its as bad as you make out. The reels the cable comes on are often quite small and thats the most severe bending its going to come across most of the time. The cable is resistant to bending anyway and its rare that you would be bending it one way then the other. Definitely nowhere near as unsafe as my Y cable suggestion.



Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text