Underfloor Heating - all parts £10 each (rrp £100) B&Q in-store
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Underfloor Heating - all parts £10 each (rrp £100) B&Q in-store

29
Found 2nd Sep 2012
Was in B&Q in Farnborough (Hants) and noticed all their underfloor heating stuff was reduced to £10 each. The previous prices were between £30 and £100. The stickers were red clearance stickers so may be local only. The brand was Ecofilmset.

They had plenty of different sizes of mats (upto 4m x 1m i think) and installation kits, which were reduced from £94. They didn't have any thermostats though. They also had the vapour barriers. There was more than in the picture.

29 Comments

Original Poster

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-9DpeZ1hCwX4/UEN-eyyvWPI/AAAAAAAAGH4/h7DNwxc6W6I/s1117/IMG_20120902_143902.jpg

Misses nailed this one shut, she'd rather just put slippers on. Saves me a job

correctly planned and installed, this is the best thing ever. the uk is somewhat behind in its attitude...quite odd..

earwolfigz

correctly planned and installed, this is the best thing ever. the uk is … correctly planned and installed, this is the best thing ever. the uk is somewhat behind in its attitude...quite odd..



total rubbish! sure its great when its on, but under tiles it takes age to heat up, so you have to leave it - now thats not very enviro friendly is it and its a waste on money as how often will you use it! hardly ever.

mind you at this price worth a shout

2000 year old tech! Heat rises. Hmmm, maybe it worked.
This heats the property, not the floor for your feet...

royals

total rubbish! sure its great when its on, but under tiles it takes age … total rubbish! sure its great when its on, but under tiles it takes age to heat up, so you have to leave it - now thats not very enviro friendly is it and its a waste on money as how often will you use it! hardly ever.mind you at this price worth a shout



So speaks a man who doesn't understand how underfloor heating works, how much more effective it is at heating a house, and how much cheaper it is to heat large spaces. And how much nicer it is without radiators taking up space on the walls.

Can people afford to run this type of heating, I remember the first property I lived in had this back in the seventy's and even then it was expensive to run and fuel prices were very low compared to now.

Newbold

total rubbish! sure its great when its on, but under tiles it takes age … total rubbish! sure its great when its on, but under tiles it takes age to heat up, so you have to leave it - now thats not very enviro friendly is it and its a waste on money as how often will you use it! hardly ever.So speaks a man who doesn't understand how underfloor heating works, how much more effective it is at heating a house, and how much cheaper it is to heat large spaces. And how much nicer it is without radiators taking up space on the walls.



Agree total rubbish. Under Floor heating is great. I leave mine on 24 hours a day ( in winter). Each room can be set at a different temperature and it stays at that temperature. No wasted wall space with hot radiators. The wooden or tiled floor is lovely to walk on and it is very efficient to run. Voted Hot.
Edited by: "Ianw555" 3rd Sep 2012

It isn't efficient if its on all the time - even when the house is empty.
With other heating methods you turn it off at times when the house is empty - with this method it takes so long to heat up that its usually left on 24 hrs a day. So it costs more to run.

Don't fall for any " more efficient" con. All electric heating is technically more efficient than gas as no heat is wasted up a chimney/flue . But that does not mean its cheaper to run ( as electric costs significantly more per KW than gas).

Great for those with the free solar deals from a shade greener etc

My old man uses water fed under floor heating and jesus it keeps hot even when off

If its electric it will cost a fortune to run. Any people I know who have had it fitted in just a bathroom end up turning it off and never using it due to the costs.

The only good underfloor heating system is a wet one, and they are designed to be run 24/7 or thereabouts. Generally it's more efiicient to run central heating constantly at a low temperature than keep having it coming on and off at higher temperatures.

You can compare it to a long journey in a car, the first chap goes a constant 50 miles an hour non stop to his destination, the second goes flat out at half hour intervals with rests in between till he gets there. First person is going to use less fuel, and the car should, in theory, last longer.

simes

It isn't efficient if its on all the time - even when the house is … It isn't efficient if its on all the time - even when the house is empty. With other heating methods you turn it off at times when the house is empty - with this method it takes so long to heat up that its usually left on 24 hrs a day. So it costs more to run.Don't fall for any " more efficient" con. All electric heating is technically more efficient than gas as no heat is wasted up a chimney/flue . But that does not mean its cheaper to run ( as electric costs significantly more per KW than gas).



1 There's no need to leave it on 24 hours a day. You can if you choose to, but ours goes off at night and the house warms up quickly the following morning. You certainly don't need to leave it on when the house is empty! It's a myth that it takes a long time to heat up, as anyone with a properly installed underfloor heating system will confirm.

2 Electric? Who said anything about using electricity?

Any heating done by electric has to be on night time only electric to be efficient. If on 24hrs it will be very expensive to run. After twenty years the elements go and it has to be disguarded and replaced with other heating, or rip the floor up. It's excellent if you can afford it for space saving and warm floors.

we've got this system in our bathroom and it's great - get the proper programmable thermostat and it keeps it toasty when you want it (mornings and evenings) and at a much lower temp at other times....hasn't had a big impact on our leccy bills but haven't done an accurate test to see what it costs.

Newbold

1 There's no need to leave it on 24 hours a day. You can if you choose … 1 There's no need to leave it on 24 hours a day. You can if you choose to, but ours goes off at night and the house warms up quickly the following morning. You certainly don't need to leave it on when the house is empty! It's a myth that it takes a long time to heat up, as anyone with a properly installed underfloor heating system will confirm.2 Electric? Who said anything about using electricity?



This system is electric for under bathroom floors you are talking about a completely different system to this deal! The comments above are right for THIS system, not yours!
Edited by: "kudos1uk" 3rd Sep 2012

themorgatron

You can compare it to a long journey in a car, the first chap goes a … You can compare it to a long journey in a car, the first chap goes a constant 50 miles an hour non stop to his destination, the second goes flat out at half hour intervals with rests in between till he gets there. First person is going to use less fuel, and the car should, in theory, last longer.



BS, poor analogy.

A car is less efficient at higher speeds - air resistance and friction being the biggest factors, which is very different from the thermodynamics of heating. Read up on hypermiling - the canonical technique is burn and coast, the antithesis of your "constant speed" recommendation.

It is better to turn heating off when not in use - heat loss is proportional to the temperature difference, so a warmer house loses heat faster and needs more fuel to replace the lost heat and keep the temperature constant.

(pathos argument: I have a BSc in chemistry and used to work for british gas)
Edited by: "foobie" 3rd Sep 2012

Are these units waterproof? May be cheaper than proper heat mats in a reptile viv! Or even for outdoor plants that need a bit of extra heat in the winter?

Wow how many arguments about econimical suitabilty? I sell bathrooms for a living and although nothing to do with this product I can bet most uk bathrooms have towel warmers in which is why this product exists because towel warmer are completely useless at heating rooms the BTU rating is usually about a 10th of what a room needs............

Just been into my 2 local stores neither had this and advised it had been discontinued a while ago. It was for wood floor. He did have a look for a few items on the system and found some stores still had some stock but no where in london that i could see

The way to look at UFH is that it takes a heat source (such as Gas, Oil, Ground Source, Air Source, Electric) and make the best use of it, i.e. it's utilises it's heat source in the most efficient way. You wouldn't switch your Gas system to Electric but if you're on storage heaters then you would save a fortune using Electric UFH.

Try Go Geothermal Ltd (www.gogeothermal.co.uk), they do renewable heat and UFH.

UFH is ok if you have large floor areas. If you got small rooms forget it. Also its not always great for instance in a kitchen its nice until you start cooking and slaving away and your like a cat on a hot tin roof. All types of heating can be equally efficient, but not all types are suited to each persons lifestyle. If your house is new and borderline passive house and you have a min of 100mm underfloor insulation and you're home most of the day then UFH is great. I prefer it to be under the screed but on top of concrete with 100mm insulation under the conrete, that gives a more rounded temp due to the concrete acting as a heat sink. Bottom line it is just another form of heating and its no better than any other. It has limitations, for example if you have small rooms and you are in work all day then forget it - gas CH will slaughter it, both in cost and comfort.

kudos1uk

This system is electric for under bathroom floors you are talking about a … This system is electric for under bathroom floors you are talking about a completely different system to this deal! The comments above are right for THIS system, not yours!



This underfloor heating system is actually for heating wood or laminate floors in any room except from a bathroom. you can not install this in wet areas, due to the wiring regulations.

TBH... I'm not that bothered about cold tiles... Id rather save the hassle/money and just wear an extra pair of socks for those days that I'm spending allot of time walking on the tiles on a cold day.

Good price tho I guess.

We have this in the en-suite, comes on at 5 goes off at 7.30, much nicer to walk on warm tiles 1st thing in the morning, stays warm for a few hours after switch off and very cheap to run. Approx 20w per metre, we have 4sq/m just where you would usually stand, Use this alongside wet towel rad and perfect for a 2m x 3m floor en-suite.

Jumicarm

We have this in the en-suite, comes on at 5 goes off at 7.30, much nicer … We have this in the en-suite, comes on at 5 goes off at 7.30, much nicer to walk on warm tiles 1st thing in the morning, stays warm for a few hours after switch off and very cheap to run. Approx 20w per metre, we have 4sq/m just where you would usually stand, Use this alongside wet towel rad and perfect for a 2m x 3m floor en-suite.

20 watts per metre, I am sure 20 watts would not generate much heat.

LOUD NOISES!

I want to put this under stainless tiles in the bathroom!

foobie

BS, poor analogy.A car is less efficient at higher speeds - air … BS, poor analogy.A car is less efficient at higher speeds - air resistance and friction being the biggest factors, which is very different from the thermodynamics of heating. Read up on hypermiling - the canonical technique is burn and coast, the antithesis of your "constant speed" recommendation.It is better to turn heating off when not in use - heat loss is proportional to the temperature difference, so a warmer house loses heat faster and needs more fuel to replace the lost heat and keep the temperature constant.(pathos argument: I have a BSc in chemistry and used to work for british gas)



Sorry but I spent four years training to heat houses, and a number of years since honing my trade, quite what a Chemistry degree has to do with it I don't know. I also find the only people impressed by British Gas credentials are the elderly and the imbeciles.

Perhaps the car analogy was out so apoligies, but I was mentioning fuel efficiency in the same way as burning gas. A car going faster uses more fuel the same way a boiler running hotter uses more gas. Modern boilers are designed to run at their most efficient when burning at the lowest flame possible, and can do so for 24 hours using less gas than being run hard for a few hours a day. In many European countries (such as Germany), it is mandatory to fit controls that enable the boiler to run like this. It also uses much more energy to heat a house from cold than to keep it at an optimal temperature.

It's all moot because this is electic of course, yet to meet a customer who is happy with any that have been installed but apparantly there are a few on this thread.
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