Unibond Multi Repair 3-in-1 Sealant & Adhesive Triple Pack £2.50 @ Screwfix
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Unibond Multi Repair 3-in-1 Sealant & Adhesive Triple Pack £2.50 @ Screwfix

32
Found 19th Aug 2009Made hot 19th Aug 2009
Sealant, adhesive, gap filler etc. All in one application.

3 x 300ml. For universal applications. Instant grab, UV-resistant, bonds to damp surfaces. Can be used in all weather conditions.

Usually sells at over £10 per tube but is being cleared at screwfix for £2.50 for 3 tubes.

Comes with a 35 year guarantee (not sure I'd keep the receipt for that long though).

32 Comments

Can this be used to fix an Ikea TV stand i maybe broke while leaning on it?

is this instore too?

Original Poster

schizoboy;6061257

Can this be used to fix an Ikea TV stand i maybe broke while leaning on … Can this be used to fix an Ikea TV stand i maybe broke while leaning on it?



Its worth a try for £2.50 (maybe) ;-)

bargainhunter2009;6061312

is this instore too?



Yes, instore too which saves on delivery. It may come up at normal price of £21 odd pounds, but the lovely girl :oops: overrode the price.

Normal price is a joke but its cheap at £2-50 for sure.

cheap, cheap, cheap!

ouch! +£5 P&P on top

So how does this differ from 3x99p for three tubes of silcon? (which does all three things also.)

Oh! Except that the silicon never had a silly £29 odd price tag.

Silicon is not an adhesive.

den169;6062535

Silicon is not an adhesive.



Oh!

REALLY?
Define adhesive then?

Silicon is not an adhesive; silicone is quite sticky tho!

would this suffice for sticking the sink to the wall???? :s

Nice one, I was going to go for the 3-in-1 tubes at the 99p shop but this is even Cheaper!

pibpob;6062663

Silicon is not an adhesive; silicone is quite sticky tho!


A local manufacturer of fish tanks STICKS all 5 bits of glass together with silicon.

They withstand the pressure of gallons of water.

I think that counts as an adhesive.

I regularly use Jam to stick two slices of bread together and at the same time my love of jam means I can never stick to a diet.
These definitions can be tricky.

rizla01;6062566

Oh! REALLY?Define adhesive then?




Definition:
Adhesive or glue is a compound in a liquid or semi-liquid state that adheres or bonds items together. Adhesives may come from either natural or synthetic sources. Some modern adhesives are extremely strong, and are becoming increasingly important in modern construction and industry. The types of materials that can be bonded using adhesives is virtually limitless, but they are especially useful for bonding thin materials.

SILICONE is NOT an adhesive....per se....definition of silicon is:
Silicones are largely inert, man-made compounds with a wide variety of forms and uses. Typically heat-resistant, nonstick, and rubberlike, they are commonly used in cookware, medical applications, sealants, adhesives, lubricants, and insulation.

So................silicone can be USED in adhesives ( amongst a gazillion other things... ) but is not an adhesive in itself...

den169 wins...you lose.... it's stiil a good deal though for £2.50 ;-)

Original Poster

foxymissroxy;6062676

would this suffice for sticking the sink to the wall???? :s


"This multi repair 3 in 1 sealant, adhesive and filler is a multi purpose sealant, adhesive and gap filler with a good initial grab. Suitable for sealing joints, filling movement cracks and bonding almost any building material in all weather conditions from -30°C to + 90°C. Due to its versatility, there is virtually no need for any other sealant or adhesive.
With patented FLEXTEC technology for superior performance, it makes this sealant paintable, can bond to damp and wet surfaces and is UV resistant.
Suitable for:
Interior, Exterior, Sealant, Adhesive, Gap Filler, Bathrooms, Kitchens, Worktops, Windows, Tiles Areas Wood, Cement, Brick, Stone, Tiles, Metals, Glass & Ceramics."

Thanks - gone for some of this. Hopefully it is still in stock.

Thanks again,

iecuk

rizla01;6063853

A local manufacturer of fish tanks STICKS all 5 bits of glass together … A local manufacturer of fish tanks STICKS all 5 bits of glass together with silicon.

No, they stick them together with silicone.

rizla01;6063853

A local manufacturer of fish tanks STICKS all 5 bits of glass together … A local manufacturer of fish tanks STICKS all 5 bits of glass together with silicon.They withstand the pressure of gallons of water.I think that counts as an adhesive.



They don't hold much water if they only consist of 5 pieces of glass, taks that hold a lot of water have extra struts to make them stonger. And they are usually glued on the outside joints with an adhesive, and rhe inner joints sealed with sillicone because of its inert properties

Trentend;6064124

I regularly use Jam to stick two slices of bread together and at the same … I regularly use Jam to stick two slices of bread together and at the same time my love of jam means I can never stick to a diet.These definitions can be tricky.

................Bravo !! Intelligent argument,I like it .Definite rep m8

mike23;6064286

... SILICONE is NOT an adhesive....per se....definition of silicon … ... SILICONE is NOT an adhesive....per se....definition of silicon is:Silicones are largely inert, man-made compounds with a wide variety of forms and uses. Typically heat-resistant, nonstick, and rubberlike, they are commonly used in cookware, medical applications, sealants, adhesives, lubricants, and insulation.So................silicone can be USED in adhesives ( amongst a gazillion other things... ) but is not an adhesive in itself...



Let's try to get the terminology and concepts right, folks. 'Silicone' (with an 'e') is the generic name for a wide range of compounds with a variable composition but having a component of the element 'silicon' (no 'e'); mike's definition of silicone above is good enough. Some silicones - compounds remember - are indeed intended to be used as adhesives (e.g. for aquarium assembly and the like) and others, whilst sticky enough to act as an adhesive, are primarily for gap-filling, waterproofing etc. The average DIYer will come across several types; that properly used for sealing a worktop or shower is not the same as one used around a windowframe or for roofwork. Look at the Screwfix website for examples and note that some are 'low modulus' and some 'high modulus' (effectively defining the amount of give or stretch they possess).

The Unibond product is probably a good gap-filler (for making good tradesmen's bodges etc!) but I haven't tried it - yet. Just be wary if buying it (or any other silicone) that it is not out-of-date - shelf-life of an unopened cartridge should be at least a year and is often much more, but don't expect it to last too long once opened, even if carefully re-sealed (e.g. with polythene sheet taped tightly round nozzle).

Screwfix also has some quite good Forge Steel tool offers at present, but it did seem to me that several of these tool prices had been increased fairly recently before being discounted. (Oh, surely not?? I hear you all say.)

Good point about sell-by dates: the neutral cure stuff's mode of failure is to refuse to set, so you end up by having silicone grease everywhere. Not pleasant. :x

I've just looked more closely at this Unibond product and it is not a silicone compound, as some might have thought from reading the comments above. It appears to be a water-based polyurethane compound which will be quite easy and clean to use (wipe off excess with damp cloth). It should have a much longer shelf-life than silicones too, probably 2 or 3 years unopened in practice and several months at least if resealed between uses.

At the offer price given, it is as cheap as the cheapest solvent-free 'no nails' adhesive and certainly worth trying.

Been and got some today i had to show the girl the price on the web as it came up at £41 lol.

Trentend;6064124

I regularly use Jam to stick two slices of bread together and at the same … I regularly use Jam to stick two slices of bread together and at the same time my love of jam means I can never stick to a diet.These definitions can be tricky.



:giggle:

The Dow Corning 785 they had on offer for 99p was a better deal. The trade choice and wont go mouldy!

That's just sanitary silicone - its uses are far more limited, especially as the fungicide makes it a toxic product.

Got myself a pack last night. The guy on the till was impressed by the reduction and showed his colleagues.

Thanks Puffer for that explanation.
I admit I am in error and didn't realise that there is Silicon AND Silicone. (I bet few others did either). I was just referring to silicon Sealant.

Back to the product. I wonder if this is similar to Pink Grip (Damn Good) or more like No-nails (Pretty Useless IME)

Silicone sealant.:)

It's difficult even to get decorators' filler for that price.

rizla01;6074987

Back to the product. I wonder if this is similar to Pink Grip (Damn Good) … Back to the product. I wonder if this is similar to Pink Grip (Damn Good) or more like No-nails (Pretty Useless IME)



The Pink Grip that I know is a solvent-based adhesive which is pretty effective but can be an absolute b****r to control and clean-up - and dislikes any trace of damp or grease on the workpieces. And most other solvent-based adhesives are much the same, all being prone to rapid deterioration after first use. Fine if you can use a whole tube in a short period of time but wasteful and messy otherwise.

The solvent-free (water-based) adhesives are, in my experience, much easier and cleaner to use and keep. They can be used to stick most things provided that one surface at least is porous (such as wood). Their main potential disadvantage is that they may have limited 'grab' and the components need some sort of restraint or clamping whilst the glue sets. I have found that Toolstation's 'own brand' solvent-free Glue Screws (£1.10) is effective for most work, including fixing scotia floor edging to a tiled wall. I have some of the Unibond stuff to collect tomorrow from Screwfix and it will be interesting to compare it.

pibpob;6074202

That's just sanitary silicone - its uses are far more limited, especially … That's just sanitary silicone - its uses are far more limited, especially as the fungicide makes it a toxic product.Got myself a pack last night. The guy on the till was impressed by the reduction and showed his colleagues.



Yes thats correct, but being in the trade I would not use 3 in 1 jobbies. You get the best of one and the purpose you buy it for. The fungicide serves a purpose.

TeddyT;6081302

Yes thats correct, but being in the trade I would not use 3 in 1 jobbies. … Yes thats correct, but being in the trade I would not use 3 in 1 jobbies. You get the best of one and the purpose you buy it for. The fungicide serves a purpose.



Understood, but surely this product is essentially a water-based adhesive with good gap-filling properties? And there is very little obvious difference in practice between the typical solvent-free adhesive, painter's caulk and acrylic frame sealant. This may not be ideal for use as a true sealant, at least for bigger gaps, but it can be used in situations where a silicone sealant would be quite unsuitable, e.g. if to be painted over. And the reverse is of course true; silicone is far better where any significant joint movement is likely.
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