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Up from Slavery: an autobiography Kindle Edition - free on Amazon
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Up from Slavery: an autobiography Kindle Edition - free on Amazon

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Posted 8th Jun
Description
Product Description
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.
Review
“It remains one of the most important works on such an influential African-American leader.”—Professor Delia Crutchfield Cook, University of Maryland, KC “This book is a must read.”—Professor Warren C. Swindell, Indiana State University “This book is definitely a classic and I have used every year im my African-American history course.”—Professor W. Marvin Dulaney, College of Charleston “Reading ‘Up From Slavery’ has provided my students with an opportunity to encounter a key figure in African American history on his own terms. It has provided them with greater insight into the mind of this man and his times.”—C. Matthew Hawkins, Carlow College “This is a very useful edition of one of the most important primary sources in African American history. Andrews sets it in context in a first-rate introduction.”—Roy E. Finkenbine, Hampton University “It remains one of the most important works on such an influential African-American leader.”—Professor Delia Crutchfield Cook, University of Maryland, KC “This book is a must read.”—Professor Warren C. Swindell, Indiana State University “This book is definitely a classic and I have used every year im my African-American history course.”—Professor W. Marvin Dulaney, College of Charleston “Reading ‘Up From Slavery’ has provided my students with an opportunity to encounter a key figure in African American history on his own terms. It has provided them with greater insight into the mind of this man and his times.”—C. Matthew Hawkins, Carlow College “This is a very useful edition of one of the most important primary sources in African American history. Andrews sets it in context in a first-rate introduction.”—Roy E. Finkenbine, Hampton University “It remains one of the most important works on such an influential African-American leader.”—Professor Delia Crutchfield Cook, University of Maryland, KC “This book is a must read.”—Professor Warren C. Swindell, Indiana State University “This book is definitely a classic and I have used every year im my African-American history course.”—Professor W. Marvin Dulaney, College of Charleston “Reading ‘Up From Slavery’ has provided my students with an opportunity to encounter a key figure in African American history on his own terms. It has provided them with greater insight into the mind of this man and his times.”—C. Matthew Hawkins, Carlow College “This is a very useful edition of one of the most important primary sources in African American history. Andrews sets it in context in a first-rate introduction.”—Roy E. Finkenbine, Hampton University “It remains one of the most important works on such an influential African-American leader.”—Professor Delia Crutchfield Cook, University of Maryland, KC “This book is a must read.”—Professor Warren C. Swindell, Indiana State University “This book is definitely a classic and I have used every year im my African-American history course.”—Professor W. Marvin Dulaney, College of Charleston “Reading ‘Up From Slavery’ has provided my students with an opportunity to encounter a key figure in African American history on his own terms. It has provided them with greater insight into the mind of this man and his times.”—C. Matthew Hawkins, Carlow College “This is a very useful edition of one of the most important primary sources in African American history. Andrews sets it in context in a first-rate introduction.”—Roy E. Finkenbine, Hampton University
From the Inside Flap
Public Library Collector’s Edition of Booker T. Washington’s incendiary classic is accompanied by a selection of authentic slave narratives and is published to coincide with Black History Month. In addition, the volume is enhanced by a rich mix of archival material from the Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.
About the Author
Booker T. Washington recalled his childhood in his autobiography, Up From Slavery. He was born in 1856 on the Burroughs tobacco farm which, despite its small size, he always referred to as a “plantation.” His mother was a cook, his father a white man from a nearby farm. “The early years of my life, which were spent in the little cabin,” he wrote, “were not very different from those of other slaves.” He went to school in Franklin County - not as a student, but to carry books for one of James Burroughs’s daughters. It was illegal to educate slaves. “I had the feeling that to get into a schoolhouse and study would be about the same as getting into paradise,” he wrote. In April 1865 the Emancipation Proclamation was read to joyful slaves in front of the Burroughs home. Booker’s family soon left to join his stepfather in Malden, West Virginia. The young boy took a job in a salt mine that began at 4 a.m. so he could attend school later in the day. Within a few years, Booker was taken in as a houseboy by a wealthy towns-woman who further encouraged his longing to learn. At age 16, he walked much of the 500 miles back to Virginia to enroll in a new school for black students. He knew that even poor students could get an education at Hampton Institute, paying their way by working. The head teacher was suspicious of his country ways and ragged clothes. She admitted him only after he had cleaned a room to her satisfaction. In one respect he had come full circle, back to earning his living by menial tasks. Yet his entrance to Hampton led him away from a life of forced labor for good. He became an instructor there. Later, as principal and guiding force behind Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, which he founded in 1881, he became recognized as the nation’s foremost black educator. By the last years of his life, Washington had moved away from many of his accommodationist policies. Speaking out with a new frankness, Washington attacked racism. In 1915 he joined ranks with former critics to protest the stereotypical portrayal of blacks in a new movie, “Birth of a Nation.” Some months later he died at age 59. A man who overcame near-impossible odds himself, Booker T. Washington is best remembered for helping black Americans rise up from the economic slavery that held them down long after they were legally free citizens.
From the Back Cover
For half a century from its publication in 1902 Up from Slavery was the best-known book written by an African American. The life of ex-slave Booker T. Washington embodied the legendary rise of the American self-made man, and his autobiography gave prominence for the first time to the voice of a group which had to pull itself up from extreme adversity. Washington attributes his success to his belief in many of the virtues celebrated by Benjamin Franklin: selflessness, industry, pragmatism, and optimism. But from behind the mask of the humble, plainspoken schoolmaster come hints that reveal Washington the ambitious and tough-minded analyst of power, who had to balance the demands of blacks with the constraints imposed on him by whites. To read Up from Slavery is to explore the means by which Washington rose to become the most influential and powerful black American of his time. How far he compromised African American rights in order to achieve his aims remains a matter of controversy.
Synopsis
‘My life had its beginning in the midst of the most miserable, desolate, and discouraging surroundings.’ For half a century from its publication in 1901 Up from Slavery was the best known book written by an African American. The life of ex-slave Booker T Washington embodied the legendary rise of the American self-made man, and his autobiography gave prominence for the first time to the voice of a group which had to pull itself up from extreme adversity. Washington attributes his success to his belief in many of the virtues celebrated by Benjamin Franklin: selflessness, industry, pragmatism, and optimism. But from behind the mask of the humble, plainspoken schoolmaster come hints that reveal Washington the ambitious and tough-minded analyst of power who had to balance the demands of blacks with the constraints imposed on him by whites. To read Up from Slavery is to explore the means by which Washington rose to become the most influential and powerful black American of his time. How far he compromised African American rights in order to achieve his aims remains a matter of controversy.
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Thank you for another great post OP.

Timely, in view of the latest in the long line of police murders of Black innocents (George Floyd), and much appreciated.
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The author went on to form his own group, The MG's.
Thank you for another great post OP.

Timely, in view of the latest in the long line of police murders of Black innocents (George Floyd), and much appreciated.
Thanks junior.quadros🐬 An enlightening read, so apt right now.
c_1st08/06/2020 11:46

Thank you for another great post OP. Timely, in view of the latest in the …Thank you for another great post OP. Timely, in view of the latest in the long line of police murders of Black innocents (George Floyd), and much appreciated.


Not just the police:
Edited by: "scowie" 14th Jun
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