Upto £40 back from your Water company if you dont have a surface water drain (backdated 6 years)
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Upto £40 back from your Water company if you dont have a surface water drain (backdated 6 years)

204
Found 4th Apr 2016
Hi after advice from a colleague i contacted my water authority for a rebate. I have a soakaway so my rainwater does not go to a public drain. I got £39 pound back from my water company and this was backdated 6 years ie £240. Also future bills will be -£40 per years. All i did was contact my water company who sent a representative round. they then checked my drainage for 5 minute and signed me off. try it. if it works you'll save
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some more information here
So what am I actually looking for? If I have a drain in the area?
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deleted800342
What's a soakaway and how do I know if I have one?!
Ditto the above-could you please explain in very basic terms what we should be looking out for
Link in 1st comment is quite helpful.
Very interesting tip
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deleted800342
aaqeel

Link in 1st comment is quite helpful.



Didn't tell me what a soakaway is and it seems that would be an important thing to know.
Thanks! A friend's home has soakaways in their front and rear gardens. Voted hot
Edited by: "BrianJamesKelly" 4th Apr 2016
Coffee100

Ditto the above-could you please explain in very basic terms what we … Ditto the above-could you please explain in very basic terms what we should be looking out for



For most residential properties it is if the gutter down pipe goes into the mains drainage system. This will be the case in the majority of houses in towns and cities.
If you live in a more rural location and your house is set back from the road or is on a minor road you may not have this, but a soakaway.
A soakaway can be several things, a pond area on the land, natural rocks under the garden or man made with either a gravel bed (above or below ground) or a soakaway tank.
GAVINLEWISHUKD

For most residential properties it is if the gutter down pipe goes into … For most residential properties it is if the gutter down pipe goes into the mains drainage system. This will be the case in the majority of houses in towns and cities.If you live in a more rural location and your house is set back from the road or is on a minor road you may not have this, but a soakaway.A soakaway can be several things, a pond area on the land, natural rocks under the garden or man made with either a gravel bed (above or below ground) or a soakaway tank.


Thanks.
Thanks. Will check
Hmm
good post. I have private drainage and my water bill reflects this. they only charge for water supply. I had to pursue this for months but got best result in end
If you have a tank as opposed to mains sewerage the same applies, but the savings are much bigger.
lucyferror

Hmm



I wish there was a button for me to award this "most helpful comment of the year".
Also don't assume this only applies to older properties. In my terrace, approx 10 years old it had a soak away. I have no idea how I found this out though.

Now I'm thinking how I can work out if my current property has one
if you get this rebate, you better use some of that money to get a decent home insurance
fulbus

Hi after advice from a colleague i contacted my water authority for … Hi after advice from a colleague i contacted my water authority for a rebate. I have a soakaway so my rainwater does not go to a public drain. I got £39 pound back from my water company and this was backdated 6 years ie £240. Also future bills will be -£40 per years. All i did was contact my water company who sent a representative round. they then checked my drainage for 5 minute and signed me off. try it. if it works you'll save



What did the rep actually do?
Lots of sources are saying look in your house deeds....if you own it of course
GAVINLEWISHUKD

[quote=Coffee100] Ditto the above-could you please explain in very basic … [quote=Coffee100] Ditto the above-could you please explain in very basic terms what we should be looking out for


For most residential properties it is if the gutter down pipe goes into the mains drainage system. This will be the case in the majority of houses in towns and cities.
If you live in a more rural location and your house is set back from the road or is on a minor road you may not have this, but a soakaway.
A soakaway can be several things, a pond area on the land, natural rocks under the garden or man made with either a gravel bed (above or below ground) or a soakaway tank.[/quot
MJtayloronline

So what am I actually looking for? If I have a drain in the area?


This link may help explain, I think in reality very few properties will be eligible.
unitedutilities.com/sur…spx
Will this apply if you live in Scotland thanks
GAVINLEWISHUKD

For most residential properties it is if the gutter down pipe goes into … For most residential properties it is if the gutter down pipe goes into the mains drainage system. This will be the case in the majority of houses in towns and cities.If you live in a more rural location and your house is set back from the road or is on a minor road you may not have this, but a soakaway.A soakaway can be several things, a pond area on the land, natural rocks under the garden or man made with either a gravel bed (above or below ground) or a soakaway tank.



Soakaways are man made. usually 1mx1mx1m below the drain invert level at point of entry. They are filled with general building clean brick/stone material - no deleterious material - wood etc and allow the water to drain through into the subsoil. It is worth carrying out a soil porosity test to determine the rate the water flow away. This can be done with a hosepipe at formation of the hole.
Ponds and watercourses are not soakaways and any watercourse will need permission from Water Authority to discharge into it - for obvious reasons.
Edited by: "smugjojo" 4th Apr 2016
how do you find out?
vithya

how do you find out?



Lift drain inspection, then pour water into downpipe, look for water in inspection
ichabod05

I wish there was a button for me to award this "most helpful comment of … I wish there was a button for me to award this "most helpful comment of the year".


There seems to be a trend on this site just lately for people to question the helpfulness of people's comments; since when do comments need to be helpful?! People can comment for whatever reason they please. One could easily argue that your response was equally as unhelpful as the one it mocks.
egyptiangirl

Also don't assume this only applies to older properties. In my terrace, … Also don't assume this only applies to older properties. In my terrace, approx 10 years old it had a soak away. I have no idea how I found this out though. Now I'm thinking how I can work out if my current property has one



egyptiangirl

Also don't assume this only applies to older properties. In my terrace, … Also don't assume this only applies to older properties. In my terrace, approx 10 years old it had a soak away. I have no idea how I found this out though. Now I'm thinking how I can work out if my current property has one



New properties(usually) involve applications to the Local Authority - check online any planning apps. Otherwise you can ring and talk to the Building control Officer or make an inspection of drains records kept at the council offices. B/Regs applications(where made) are not generally available to the public others the others are in the public domain. Try asking long term residents too or inspect the deeds..
Edited by: "smugjojo" 4th Apr 2016
Also keen to know if this applies for Scotland
I had a water meter fitted and my water bill went down from £35 per month to £17 per month - saved me £216 per year. You can try having the meter for a year and if you don't save you can go back to being unmetered. Big savings to be made and the water meter is fitted free. It also doesn't have to be read as it is a smart meter and reads itself. Well worth doing.
You were lucky to get backdate 6 years as they are legally only entitled to backdate a year and most only do this
I'm guessing this is a no. But this is not for flat/apartment residents?
My garage has a soakaway
deanos

You were lucky to get backdate 6 years as they are legally only entitled … You were lucky to get backdate 6 years as they are legally only entitled to backdate a year and most only do this


'Required', not 'entitled'.
69philip0

I had a water meter fitted and my water bill went down from £35 per month … I had a water meter fitted and my water bill went down from £35 per month to £17 per month - saved me £216 per year. You can try having the meter for a year and if you don't save you can go back to being unmetered. Big savings to be made and the water meter is fitted free. It also doesn't have to be read as it is a smart meter and reads itself. Well worth doing.



My brothers 1 bed ground floor apartment has a water meter and it costs him almost £600 a year in water.
Having to watch how often you flush. How often you wash. And how you do your dishes to save money is crappie. Unmetered is the best and always will be.
Coffee100

Ditto the above-could you please explain in very basic terms what we … Ditto the above-could you please explain in very basic terms what we should be looking out for

a soakaway is a something which is installed in your garden so all your rainwater drains to it and naturally drains away rather than connecting to the public sewers. as the water company is not taking away and treating your rainwater you should naturally not be charged for this service.
What if you have a mix of soakaways AND some use of the drain?
jordni

My brothers 1 bed ground floor apartment has a water meter and it costs … My brothers 1 bed ground floor apartment has a water meter and it costs him almost £600 a year in water.Having to watch how often you flush. How often you wash. And how you do your dishes to save money is crappie. Unmetered is the best and always will be.



I would get that checked as he may have a leak somewhere. My house with 5 of us living there costs only just over £600pa. Switch off the water supply in the flat and see if the water meter continues to move. Meters will always be cheaper than unmetered unless you're filling a swimming pool or pond every year.
fulbus. having worked at seven tent water I know all about swd. the water companies are actually scamming customers and using the regulator ofwat to do it. all water companies are responsible for new connections. when a developer submits an application to build new homes he also submits an application and plan as to how he intends to deal with water, foul and swd. so the water company knows in advance whether a newly built home is connected to their system. however once the house is built the billing section of the water company takes over and creates a new account. they add all the services as standard. the only question they ask is whether the new build is a flat/terraced, semi or detached and place the property in the appropriate banding. their thinking is of the property is not connected then the customer will dispute the charge. most customers are oblivious of all this and assume the printed charges are correct. in this way water companies make money from providing no service. when the customer does find out the water companies have covered their backs through their scheme of charges which had been ok'd by the bungulator ofwat.
69philip0

I had a water meter fitted and my water bill went down from £35 per month … I had a water meter fitted and my water bill went down from £35 per month to £17 per month - saved me £216 per year. You can try having the meter for a year and if you don't save you can go back to being unmetered. Big savings to be made and the water meter is fitted free. It also doesn't have to be read as it is a smart meter and reads itself. Well worth doing.



Went from no meter to having a meter (without choice) we now pay £85pcm, a couple plus 2yr old.
I tried to claim this two years ago as my extension moved both gutter downpipes and linked them up to a buried gravel pit which is adjacent. However, they feed into this pit through standard pipes and the water board (Northumbrian Water) despite having the building plans, have stated that they would have to excavate in order to prove this which is completely impractical.
ichabod05

I wish there was a button for me to award this "most helpful comment of … I wish there was a button for me to award this "most helpful comment of the year".


Hmm I'm doing my best
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