VERDO Wood Long Burning Briquettes (6 Pack) £2.49 @ Home Bargains or Quality Save
362°Expired

VERDO Wood Long Burning Briquettes (6 Pack) £2.49 @ Home Bargains or Quality Save

46
Found 27th Oct 2013
I think this is an amazing deal.. these logs normally retail for £5.49 and even if you buy in bulk direct, cost a lot more than this. These are logs are made from waste compressed wood shavings from saw mills in Scotland. It's renewable energy.

4.8-4.9 kWh / Kg
<10% moisture
Minimal ash
Each pack delivers 48kWh..

By way of comparison, I looked up the price for the equivalent in British Gas standard rates. In my location per unit it's :

Payment Type Standing Charge Unit Rate
Cash/Card 26.000 4.970
Direct Debit 26.000 4.660
Prepayment 26.000 4.970

48 units at 4.970 = £2.39 plus the standing charge 26 = £2.65. These logs are cheaper than British Gas !! This a is pretty decent value energy. At these prices, it works out much cheaper than proper hard wood. Tried a few logs. and I'm sold on it. Ordered 240Kg for £60. I was reckoning on spending £200 on wood for the winter, but I reckon this will see me through.

Some of the benefits of this stuff :

Low moisture content means less smoke.. means less crap up your chimney...
Burns for a long time..
Consistent fuel content, break it up into desired kilowatt sizes..
Breaks up easily with hammer or by hand..
Very little mess...
Packs stack nicely in perfect rectangles, in garage, cupboards etc..
High density so takes up less space than wood..
No need to chop wood..
Wrapped, unpeel each 48kWh pack as needed..

Any downsides? It doesn't look as fancy as logs when burning. It expands quite a lot, so you need to allow for that.

Other than that.. errm.....

You can order via this link.. same price at Quality Save

homebargains.co.uk/pro…spx

46 Comments

Original Poster

http://www.centralwoodpellets.co.uk/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/Briquettegroup2.jpg
http://www.woofwoodfuel.co.uk/images/Verdo-Briquettes-lge.jpg

Original Poster

http://www.champfleurieestate.co.uk/acatalog/Vbriquette100L.JPG
https://lcwoodpellets.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Breaking-Briquettes.jpg

can these be used in smokeless

Just me who thinks these look edible?

I just burn everything.....plastic....the lot. Going to make the air rank for all those coporate bosses whose greed is unsaitible plus plastic good for lighting the fire plus their is always loads of it. So you greenies out there get off my back and deal with china and india first

I have no way to use these but voting hot just for the effort put into the post.

This year I switched my heating to these cool little remote controlled oil radiators that monitor their own temperature. So you just set what temperature you want the room to be and that's that. I bought these little LCD temperature clocks that sit in each room to see if they were really working to keep the room consistently at the temp I wanted and within 1-2c they do. The ultimate lazy persons heating system but I do miss a real fire.

Voted hot and I don't know who you are, but anyone that makes a pun about heat, I will find you and I will kill you.

steluca5

Just me who thinks these look edible?



It's the guy breaking one that does it. It looks like he's breaking into a big baguette heh

Cant beat proper wood logs.I would not burn these in my log burner.Mega expensive .Cold.


If you wait until tomorrow morning there'll be quite a few bits of tree lying around for free. You'll be doing everyone a favour if you take it home and burn it.

michaelgordon2

can these be used in smokeless



+1 Very good question. You would have to guess at yes otherwise, why would Home Bargains be selling them when all their stores are in towns or cities. You would need to know their official classification as they don't seem to fit into any of the main ones.

Original Poster

monitor1

Mega expensive .Cold.



It's cheaper than wood ! You've got to look at the calorific content. This is denser in terms of heat output than staple favourites like ash. (_;)

Stuff that's commonly sold as 'seasoned hardwood' for £50 per builders sack might look impressive visually. It's rarely seasoned properly. It's often wet. Most wood burners should only use seasoned wood with <20% water content.

michaelgordon2

can these be used in smokeless



Yes with a DEFRA approved stove, no in an open grate or non DEFRA stove. Realistically I wonder how many councils actually have the staff to enforce the legislation.

mjr600

Yes with a DEFRA approved stove, no in an open grate or non DEFRA stove. … Yes with a DEFRA approved stove, no in an open grate or non DEFRA stove. Realistically I wonder how many councils actually have the staff to enforce the legislation.



So are they officially classed as wood logs then?

I would so love a real open fire again. We have a fire place with chimney but in s smokeless zone (tho that doesn't seem to affect those numpties lighting bonfires in the summer)

GAVINLEWISHUKD

So are they officially classed as wood logs then?



http://smokecontrol.defra.gov.uk/fuels.php?country=e

You can burn wood in an approved stove, they are wood, not on the smokeless list, legal in the right stove, otherwise not.

mjr600

http://smokecontrol.defra.gov.uk/fuels.php?country=eYou can burn wood in … http://smokecontrol.defra.gov.uk/fuels.php?country=eYou can burn wood in an approved stove, they are wood, not on the smokeless list, legal in the right stove, otherwise not.



Wood burnt in approved stoves is only legal if it is air dried logs. These are not air dried logs, therefore are not legal to burn in smoke control areas.
Edited by: "nick9" 27th Oct 2013

JamesSmith

It's cheaper than wood ! You've got to look at the calorific content. … It's cheaper than wood ! You've got to look at the calorific content. This is denser in terms of heat output than staple favourites like ash. (_;)Stuff that's commonly sold as 'seasoned hardwood' for £50 per builders sack might look impressive visually. It's rarely seasoned properly. It's often wet. Most wood burners should only use seasoned wood with <20% water content.



Or spend your Sunday mornings walking in the local woods .... collect the dead wood and build yourself a log pile at the bottom of the garden.
It's free and looks so much better on a real fire.

mjr600

http://smokecontrol.defra.gov.uk/fuels.php?country=eYou can burn wood in … http://smokecontrol.defra.gov.uk/fuels.php?country=eYou can burn wood in an approved stove, they are wood, not on the smokeless list, legal in the right stove, otherwise not.



No Verdo ones listed on that list?

It's says on the packet 'wood briquettes' our stove is only approved for pellets, chips and logs.

nick9

Wood burnt in approved stoves is only legal if it is air dried logs. … Wood burnt in approved stoves is only legal if it is air dried logs. These are not air dried logs, therefore are not legal to burn in smoke control areas.



This is where all the confusion seems to come in. As they have not paid for named certification then are they not allowed? But in essence they are just bigger versions of pellets?

Original Poster

Master G

Or spend your Sunday mornings walking in the local woods .... collect the … Or spend your Sunday mornings walking in the local woods .... collect the dead wood and build yourself a log pile at the bottom of the garden. It's free and looks so much better on a real fire.



That's fine for next year. Indeed I've got an ash tree lined up. But how do I heat my home now ?

Anything gathered now needs to air for many months...

wow.. £200 on wood? £100 on smokeless fuel would get you through winter.

JamesSmith

Anything gathered now needs to air for many months...


Not if it's dead it doesn't.
Edited by: "trogggy" 27th Oct 2013

This any good for my pizza oven, bearing in mind you eat from the fire floor? Interested to find out if any recycled materials are included

This any good for my pizza oven, bearing in mind you eat from the fire floor? Interested to find out if any recycled materials are included

Had my chimney swept a couple of weeks back for winter.. and the guy recommended not to burn these as they leave tar? (something anyway) up the chimney.. anyone confirm or deny?

I am burning briquettes now and had no issues granted they not these ones but ones I bought in B&M and a local sawmill. These are normally just compressed wood nothing else should be there, done under pressure so they expand and break up when heated. As they burn hotter than logs and near coal you should get a good clean burn

What causes tar is wet wood or if it has chemical added like paint, creosote etc

sambartle_theone

Had my chimney swept a couple of weeks back for winter.. and the guy … Had my chimney swept a couple of weeks back for winter.. and the guy recommended not to burn these as they leave tar? (something anyway) up the chimney.. anyone confirm or deny?


Edited by: "shrek" 27th Oct 2013

Original Poster

shrek

What causes tar is wet wood or if it has chemical added like paint, … What causes tar is wet wood or if it has chemical added like paint, creosote etc



Exactly right, and just goes to show how careful you've got to be when taking advice. When I had a stove fitted I got a complete spectrum of advice... it's very confusing to be honest but in this case, it's very simple. There's <10% moisture in these logs. It burns clean. If you see smoke at your chimney you're doing something wrong!

Very Hot Only trouble is, I live miles from nearest store & not available for home delivery

There's a lot of misinformation in this thread. I'll try to be brief and cover some facts but if anyone has genuine questions please ask (I used to enforce the legislation):

1) These are not smokeless nor are they approved for burning in smokeless zones, regardless of the appliance.

2) You can't compare kWh from mains gas to these unless you're referring to a single point source, like a gas fire. Boilers and central heating are much more efficient as they heat all space, rather than one room. That said, these are quite highly calorific.

3) These are usually made from bark and sawdust/chippings. They're almost always virgin wood so have limited contamination risk.

4) Any fuel can cause tar/creosote build up in the appliance and chimney if not burned hot enough. These produce less overall but still require to be burned at the correct temperature. A chimney thermometer is your friend.

5) These need to be kept dry as they turn to unusable mush if they get wet. If the get damp (as opposed to wet) they can go mouldy.

6) Smoke Control Orders only apply to chimneys, not bonfires. Common misconception. This means that they do apply to garden sheds and greenhouses. Chimneas and pizza ovens are always a grey area as they are technically for food use so they should be overlooked.

7) Council's are always on the look out as it can be used as a revenue fund if they so wish. Also, you'd be surprised how many snitches there are.

Only DEFRA approved appliances and fuels, in the approved combination, are exempt from Smoke Control Orders. For example, you can't burn straw logs in an appliance licenced for air dried wood and remain compliant.

Hope that helps.

steluca5

Just me who thinks these look edible?



Yeah, thumbnail picture looked just like a pile of flakes to me lol

Original Poster

Got to take issue with a couple of points here :

GothBoy

1) These are not smokeless nor are they approved for burning in smokeless … 1) These are not smokeless nor are they approved for burning in smokeless zones



When burning correctly there should be no visible smoke at the chimney.

Have checked and no these are not on the smokeless zone approved list. VERDO probably just hasn't applied for fuel authorisation, so it's a technical/legal issue rather than one of fuel quality. Can only recommend for unrestricted zones.

GothBoy

2) You can't compare kWh from mains gas to these unless you're referring … 2) You can't compare kWh from mains gas to these unless you're referring to a single point source, like a gas fire. Boilers and central heating are much more efficient as they heat all space, rather than one room.



I don't think heating unoccupied rooms is very efficient.

It's faulty to assume that central heating is more efficient. I live in a property where that is not the case!

You can of course you can compare £/kWh.. if you take relevant factors into account. I'm giving credit to the intelligence of readers not to make daft assumptions.

GothBoy

4) Any fuel can cause tar/creosote build up in the appliance and chimney … 4) Any fuel can cause tar/creosote build up in the appliance and chimney if not burned hot enough. These produce less overall but still require to be burned at the correct temperature. A chimney thermometer is your friend.



A flue thermometer is a useful guide for first time stove users. I also recommend getting to know your stove with an IR thermometer, and a moisture meter for your fuel sources.

Some links to said items :

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Wm-0uERcL._SY450_.jpg
£12.55 Stovax Stove Flue Pipe Thermometer

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/412haV-5FHL._SY450_.jpg
£12.50 Digital Non-Contact Laser IR Infrared Thermometer -50-550℃

http://electronics.buysku.com/Electronics-image/2013-7/MD-812-Handheld-LCD-Display-Digital-Wood-Moisture-Content-Meter-6351055126267187501.jpg
£18.99 Digital Wood MD-812 Moisture Meter
Edited by: "JamesSmith" 28th Oct 2013

monitor1

Cant beat proper wood logs.I would not burn these in my log burner.Mega … Cant beat proper wood logs.I would not burn these in my log burner.Mega expensive .Cold.


As someone who owns a Morso S10-40 wood burner I tried these last night vs using my normal seasoned and kiln dried logs, I have to say at £2.50 a pack I was very very sceptical indeed, I was very surprised at A.The amount of heat that was created B.The amount of time they burned vs my normal logs. I ended up ordering 30 packs of these today to collect from a local store.

Dont knock them before you have tried them is what I would say!

Very please indeed !

Sorry, I said chimney and not flue, even thought it's exactly the same thing, depends on what you're used to calling them really.

As for smokeless, these do produce smoke when lighting up, hence why I said they produce smoke. You can produce as much smoke as you want from an approved appliance burning an approved fuel but can still be held in breach if burning something like this, even if only wisps of smoke are emitted. This is not related to Dark Smoke which is totally different part of the Clean Air Act.

It is also illegal for the seller to sell you a non-authorised fuel to burn in a Smoke Control Area unless it is to be burned in an Approved Appliance. I have an approved appliance (for wood) but would still be breaching the law to burn these in it as the appliance is only approved for dry virgin timber. You have to remember this law was originally from 1956 and in response to lots of deaths in London from smog so it was very reactionary (and poorly worded). The Clean Air Act in 1993 should have helped... but guess what... (_;)

Best place for thermometers is Aldi, on the rare occasions they get them in (were £3.99 recently).

JamesSmith

It's cheaper than wood ! You've got to look at the calorific content. … It's cheaper than wood ! You've got to look at the calorific content. This is denser in terms of heat output than staple favourites like ash. (_;)Stuff that's commonly sold as 'seasoned hardwood' for £50 per builders sack might look impressive visually. It's rarely seasoned properly. It's often wet. Most wood burners should only use seasoned wood with <20% water content.


I get wood offcuts for free so I think that these are very expensive too. I regularly check the moisture content of the wood that I burn and the highest reading that I have had thus far is 13.8% which is well under the 20% maximum.

You can't really compare the energy output from burning something on an open fireplace (where most of the heat energry is lost through the chimney of your home) to burning gas in a boiler (which heats water to run your central heating system so much less energy is lost - through exhaust from the boiler).

reakt

You can't really compare the energy output from burning something on an … You can't really compare the energy output from burning something on an open fireplace (where most of the heat energry is lost through the chimney of your home) to burning gas in a boiler (which heats water to run your central heating system so much less energy is lost - through exhaust from the boiler).


There's no doubt that modern boilers are much more efficient that open fires or even stoves but when you can get wood offcuts for free, who cares? (_;)

Original Poster

reakt

You can't really compare the energy output from burning something on an … You can't really compare the energy output from burning something on an open fireplace (where most of the heat energry is lost through the chimney of your home) to burning gas in a boiler (which heats water to run your central heating system so much less energy is lost - through exhaust from the boiler).



What is provided is the fuel price in kWh. You certainly can compare those.

1 kWh = 1 kWh !

From that point forward, you have to use your brain.

Yeah, an open fire will not produce the same heat output as a modern CH system.

My stove however is approx 70% efficient - about the same as my gas boiler. And the stove doesn't heat loads of redundant radiators attached to outside walls in rooms that I'm not using. So it's cheaper to run. Plus it's nice and cosy.

I have found these very economical, one thing I have found is because it's so fuel dense it's hard to get a layer of the stuff - so I chuck a log in once in a while (say 5% of fuel used) just to flesh it out a bit.

Very pleased with the VERDO logs especially the convenience.

Original Poster

JunkMail

I get wood offcuts for free so I think that these are very expensive too.



I got a PS3 for free, so yeah - by the same measure, I think those things are pretty expensive too.

JamesSmith

What is provided is the fuel price in kWh. You certainly can compare … What is provided is the fuel price in kWh. You certainly can compare those.1 kWh = 1 kWh !From that point forward, you have to use your brain.Yeah, an open fire will not produce the same heat output as a modern CH system.


er, excuse me? Your comparison is absolutely irrelevant. Use your own brain (or is that actually you in your avatar perhaps?). Heat output comparison is also irrelevant since most of the heat output from your open fire / wood burner will not provide any warmth to your home as it disappears up the chimney. Now kindly go away please.
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text