Vibram FiveFingers Classic Mens £40 &  Womens £50 + £1.99 delivery from Newitts
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Vibram FiveFingers Classic Mens £40 & Womens £50 + £1.99 delivery from Newitts

28
Found 15th Dec 2011
Found these in the Newits sale, both womens and mens but low stock on all. They're usually £60 upwards so are a great bargain if you want them. I own a pair and they're extremely comfortable, although take some time to get accustomed to.

5% Quidco 5.15%TCB
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From day one, the FiveFingers Classic Shoe has drawn the attraction and praise of the press and active outdoor entusiasts alike. They are the original and patented design take a minimalist approach to barefooting.

Features

Thin, abrasion resistant stretch nylon fabric which fits low to the foot for comfort and quick drying.
Non-marking, razor-siped Vibram TC1 performance rubber soles to protect feet and provide a sure grip over a variety of terrain.
Elastic gore and pull-tab make the Classic easy to secure.


Additional Information
Foot shapes and sizes vary greatly. FiveFingers do provide some fit adjustment, but may not fit every foot type. To achieve the best fitting results for the particular style you are interested in we recommend you follow the sizing charts and instructions.
1. Stand with your heels flush against a flat vertical wall.

2. Slide a ruler under each foot and measure the distance from the wall to the tip of the longest toe.

3. Take the longer of the two feet measurements.
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28 Comments
Womens here
http://www.fivefingershoes-us.com/images/Vibram%20Five%20Fingers%20Sprint%20Rose-pink%20Women%20Shoes.jpg
Edited by: "wobblywitch" 15th Dec 2011
Good price but i wouldn't buy them online.
Could be a pretty poor fit.
Always try these instore first so that you get the correct fit because of either your foot width or toe size etc.
r these water proof??
One word - Ridiculous
ZOLA_OT

r these water proof??



No they still get wet and retain water.
There are other types that are waterproof
Just because a few celebrities wore them does not justify the cost. They should cost far less than their asking price. There are a few models of fivefingers costing upwards of £150. It is real madness.
I know they look stupid but a good friend of mine has these and say they're really good for working out and keeping fit and double as aqua shoes.
smithybhoy

One word - Ridiculous




+1
smithybhoy

One word - Ridiculous


The do look it but these are good for essentially running barefoot, but without having glass and stones in your foot. I'm now running in very minimal shoes with no arch support at all, and might move to this sort of shoe in the future. I prefer it as it takes the stress out of my knees and removes the impact as I run in a different style now. shorter steps, more bent knees, more upright
These are meant to take running back to basics - natural instinct rather than the injury-causing corporate heel based running styles.

Great price for what they are, so heat added.

I'll stick to what I know though, until these are made without looking so silly!
excellent price. have used these for a number of years now, but back then were very pricey. very very durable
Pure marketing pseudo scientific rubbish. Just as 'corporate' as a pair of asics.

If they work for you fine. But for me, not having running shoes without any sort of varus wedge or biomechanical support is a no no.
Edited by: "cheapo" 20th Dec 2011
This example of vibram fivefingers is really crap. There are some really great designs of these vibrams. I would recommend you guys to check out the Vibram Komodo Sport design.

Just like someone mentioned above buying online is a bad option as you are most likely to return the product back due to the fittings. Go instore and try it on. Also try looking at vibram.com



Running gait biomechanics? If you run on your heal then these are not good. But then heal running is abnormal, that is a corporate con.
At least this means that bargain-hunters wont have to dabble with the world of Ebay fakes.
Hot!
Think I might get a pair to wear to work and impress the boss with my sense of style
42 quid for these!!!!!!!!!!!! Suddenly even UGGs look good value (no, on second thoughts I retract that last bit).
syme

Running gait biomechanics? If you run on your heal then these are not … Running gait biomechanics? If you run on your heal then these are not good. But then heal running is abnormal, that is a corporate con.



If you don't think that the heel strike is the first point of contact in a normal runners gait cycle you know absolutely nothing about biomechanics.

That is not to say that some runners naturally forefoot strike, and do so without injury.
Cheapo I have an honours degree in human kinesiology and biomechanics. Experts on here make me lol.. (take two).
good price but not got my size in the colour i want
heat added

I don't heel strike at all.
I run with the front of my feet and have struggled to find a running shoe that works in the way need it to. These are perfect for me.


cheapo

If you don't think that the heel strike is the first point of contact in … If you don't think that the heel strike is the first point of contact in a normal runners gait cycle you know absolutely nothing about biomechanics.That is not to say that some runners naturally forefoot strike, and do so without injury.


syme

Cheapo I have an honours degree in human kinesiology and biomechanics. … Cheapo I have an honours degree in human kinesiology and biomechanics. Experts on here make me lol.. (take two).



Honours degree in human kinesiology and biomechanics - you should know how to spell heel then!
syme

Cheapo I have an honours degree in human kinesiology and biomechanics. … Cheapo I have an honours degree in human kinesiology and biomechanics. Experts on here make me lol.. (take two).



Well then you must know your rebuttal was incorrect.

Also, did they not teach you how to spell 'heel'?

I reiterate, most runners will heel strike as part of the gait cycle. Please quote and refer to peer reviewed credible papers that suggest mid foot and fore foot striking occurs more than heel striking in a runners gait cycle.

teh arn

I don't heel strike at all.I run with the front of my feet and have … I don't heel strike at all.I run with the front of my feet and have struggled to find a running shoe that works in the way need it to. These are perfect for me.



The proof is in the pudding. If they work for you, and you are injury free carry on.

However, if you do have problems, I suggest seeing a Podiatrist for a biomechanical assessment, and not getting a dude in a running shop with half a days training to film you on a treadmill.
Applied kinesiology more like.
I don't go in for the barefoot pseudoscience, personally
cheapo

Well then you must know your rebuttal was incorrect. Also, did they not … Well then you must know your rebuttal was incorrect. Also, did they not teach you how to spell 'heel'?I reiterate, most runners will heel strike as part of the gait cycle. Please quote and refer to peer reviewed credible papers that suggest mid foot and fore foot striking occurs more than heel striking in a runners gait cycle.



For one, spelling does not indicate level of education.

Two.... of course more people run with a heel strike.... It is as a direct result of the development of sports shoes.

We have arches in our feet for a reason.. they are shock absorbers. Running with a heel strike yields about 4 times the impact force of landing with a midfoot strike,

Biomechanically the best way to run is with a midfoot strike... the only good thing about the heel strike is that it uses the least energy, but isnt suitable for reasonable pace due to the increased impact forces associated (and again i will reitterate here that this is the reason you see sports shoes designed the way they are with heavily shock absorbing heels.)

Forefoot striking is good for speed, but efficient and should be used over shorter distances.

Stop arguing with things you only have a small grasp of.
Edited by: "Jetpac" 20th Dec 2011
Jetpac

For one, spelling does not indicate level of education.



It does actually.

Jetpac

Two.... of course more people run with a heel strike.... It is as a … Two.... of course more people run with a heel strike.... It is as a direct result of the development of sports shoes.



What total rubbish. Please point to some credible scientific articles that suggest historically runners only started to run with a preponderate heel strike after the advent of running shoe technology and I will concede that point. As that won't happen, I will continue to call you on your wishy washy pseudo scientific approach to gait analysis.

Jetpac

We have arches in our feet for a reason.. they are shock absorbers. … We have arches in our feet for a reason.. they are shock absorbers. Running with a heel strike yields about 4 times the impact force of landing with a midfoot strike,



Evidence please (and make sure it isn't copied and pasted from a barefoot runners forum). The heel strike forms part of the gait cycle, heel strike, forefoot load, heel lift, and toe off. The combination of this process enables the distribution of force. You take away the first part of the gait cycle, and you are going to introduce biomechanical anomalies which may lead to injury.

As I have previously said, if a runner naturally misses out the heel strike without pain then it would be permissible to allow the running style to continue, whilst also informing the patient that he/she should report to a podiatrist if problems occur.


Jetpac

Biomechanically the best way to run is with a midfoot strike... the only … Biomechanically the best way to run is with a midfoot strike... the only good thing about the heel strike is that it uses the least energy, but isnt suitable for reasonable pace due to the increased impact forces associated (and again i will reitterate here that this is the reason you see sports shoes designed the way they are with heavily shock absorbing heels.) Forefoot striking is good for speed, but efficient and should be used over shorter distances.



You speak like a convert, whilst also suggesting the running shoe industry has employed a scam which forces the consumer to buy expensive shoes, when all they need to do in fact is run differently.

You have a problem with timeline I am afraid. Running shoe technology responded to a real problem, heel pain. Heel pain occurs for a variety of reasons. But Asics did not design a shoe and tell people to start running with a heel strike. People naturally run with a heel strike, and a need was met. Not the other way round.

To start telling people to change the way they naturally run because of some sort of conspiratorial notion is stupid at best, dangerous at worst.

Jetpac

Stop arguing with things you only have a small grasp of.



I have a considerable grasp of lower limb biomechanics. I'm quite enjoying this, so I will not defer to your shaky opinions. No.
No.. Spelling doesn't I know several PHDs who's spelling is terrible.. doesnt mean they are any less qualified.... absurd point to try to make.
But that is by the by.....

Am i a barefoot runner... no, am i a convert to barefoot running, No.

Yes you are correct sports shoes were a response to a problem.... but it is you who has the time frame mixed up.

Footwear in general lead to a change in gait which also lead to the heel strike becoming a predominant running style... hence the response in equipment design. If you look at areas of the world where shoes are not commonplace you will find runners have a mid strike pattern.

in terms of energy:

Fore strike - inefficient but fastest
Midstrike - equal balance, lowest force loading
Heel strike - most efficient but slowest speeds

Your "grasp" of lower limb biomechanics seems entirely based on what is the "norm" and not at all on the actual efficiency or force mechanics, let alone the end results in terms of performance.

Injury across the 3 types of running you don't really see too much of a difference.
ACSM

There is a short article in a peer reviewed journal since you are so desperate.. for some.

There is technically nothing wrong with most of what you said in that post.... however you only identified one possible style of gait cycle, which applies when walking not running.

And by no means am I implying a "scam" at all... sports shoes and their equipment design is important and well worth the money... i run with a heel strike and the cushioning is necessary. Most people do run with a heel strike.. it is a fact i never said it wasn't.

But that doesn't mean that it is the best way to run. its a simple point that wearing shoes alters your gait and strike pattern.

Im not telling anyone to change the way they run, simply stating the biomechanical standpoint (if i was suggesting everyone change i wouldnt be running with a heel strike, would i...)

You have managed to put "internet forum blinkers" on which stop you looking outside your own opinions. Requesting peer reviewed journals doesn't make you or anyone else right... you can find peer reviewed journals that support either side of the coin... it just makes you sound like a tool. If you want the journals, take a look for yourself, they are there, i am not going to make the research effort for you.

From what i have read and what you have said your "considerable grasp" seems rudimentary based on the simple gait and nothing more... though i am curious.. what gives you this "considerable grasp"? (apart from knowing what a gait cycle is).

Oh and here you go... some more research for you: Aren't I kind

Edited by: "Jetpac" 21st Dec 2011
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