WD 12 TB HDD (NAS) reduced to £345.82 at Ebuyer
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WD 12 TB HDD (NAS) reduced to £345.82 at Ebuyer

£345.82Ebuyer Deals
53
Found 27th JanEdited by:"mfktemp"
This is the Enterprise WD hdd. Just bought one for my NAS drive

Internal Hard Drive12TB
3.5"
7200 RPM
5 Year Warranty

As I am no expert, please see a review that I googled:

Western Digital has begun to ship its WD Gold HDD with 12 TB capacity to partners and large retailers. The 3.5” drive relies on the same platform as the HGST Ultrastar He12 launched this year, and will initially be available to select customers of the company. The WD Gold 12 TB is designed for enterprise workloads and has all the performance and reliability enhancements that we come to expect, but the availability at retail should make them accessible to wider audiences.

From a hardware point of view, the WD Gold 12 TB is similar to the HGST Ultrastar He12 12 TB hard drive: both are based on the fourth-generation HelioSeal technology that uses eight perpendicular magnetic recording platters with a 1.5 TB capacity for each platter. The internal architecture of both HDDs was redesigned compared to predecessors to accommodate the eighth platter. Since the WD Gold and the Ultrastar He12 are aimed at nearline enterprise environments, they are equipped with various sensors and technologies to protect themselves against vibration and as a result, guarantee sustained performance. For example, the WD Gold and the Ultrastar He12 attach their spindles both to the top and the bottom of the drives. In addition the HDDs feature a special technology that increases the accuracy of head positioning in high-vibration environments to improve performance, integrity, and reliability. Finally, both product families support TLER (time-limited error recovery) rebuild assist mode to speed up RAID recovery time.

Since the WD Gold 12 TB and the HGST Ultrastar He12 are similar internally and feature the same 7200 RPM spindle speed, they also have similar performance — the manufacturer puts them both at 255 MB/s sustained transfer rate and 4.16 ms average latency. The main difference between the WD Gold and the HGST Ultrastar He12 are the enterprise options for the latter: there are models with the SAS 12 Gb/s interface and there are models with SED support and Instant Secure Erase feature.
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friar_chris49 m ago

It's £358.80 direct from Amazon


Personally I'd pay the extra £8 not to deal with eBuyers terrible partial refund service. Absolutely appalling, especially considering one of their employee performance targets is "rejected RMAs".
Edited by: "Chuggee" 27th Jan
FireBIade2002 h, 17 m ago

That's a lot of data to lose should it go wrong, basically you have to buy …That's a lot of data to lose should it go wrong, basically you have to buy two drives to be safe or have somewhere else you can dump your data.


Why does this keep coming up on every thread? These are not normal consumer drives, anyone buying this will know backup strategies and how to protect their data.
Chuggee46 m ago

Personally I'd pay the extra £8 not to deal with eBuyers terrible partial …Personally I'd pay the extra £8 not to deal with eBuyers terrible partial refund service. Absolutely appalling, especially considering one of their employee performance targets is "rejected RMAs".


Haha, that was a classic. For anyone not familiar, here's the story.
53 Comments
Now down to £345. Very compelling.
Heat! Very tempted.
Very tempted to get a few of these for my HP Proliant server
If it has a 255MB/s transfer rater, why would you want a SAS 12 Gb/s interface? Genuine question.
Has anyone calculated how many hours of open can be saved on this size HDD
That's a lot of data to lose should it go wrong, basically you have to buy two drives to be safe or have somewhere else you can dump your data.
WessexUnderwater2 h, 2 m ago

If it has a 255MB/s transfer rater, why would you want a SAS 12 Gb/s …If it has a 255MB/s transfer rater, why would you want a SAS 12 Gb/s interface? Genuine question.


It may not all be about transfer rate, there maybe dual port in that standard making it a tiny bit more resilient to failure.
WessexUnderwater2 h, 11 m ago

If it has a 255MB/s transfer rater, why would you want a SAS 12 Gb/s …If it has a 255MB/s transfer rater, why would you want a SAS 12 Gb/s interface? Genuine question.



Cache memory transfer speeds are much faster than the drive's 255MB/s transfer speed.
WessexUnderwater2 h, 11 m ago

If it has a 255MB/s transfer rater, why would you want a SAS 12 Gb/s …If it has a 255MB/s transfer rater, why would you want a SAS 12 Gb/s interface? Genuine question.


SAS offers enterprise features which are a benefit regardless of the transfer rate.
I imagine that SAS 12Gbs is the standard so they wouldn't bother making a slower one such as 6Gbs in the same way that pretty much all SATA controllers are SATA3,
It's £334.18 direct from Amazon
It's £358.80 direct from Amazon
indeed! I was looking at the 10tb version. Time for a trip to specsavers!
friar_chris49 m ago

It's £358.80 direct from Amazon


Personally I'd pay the extra £8 not to deal with eBuyers terrible partial refund service. Absolutely appalling, especially considering one of their employee performance targets is "rejected RMAs".
Edited by: "Chuggee" 27th Jan
FireBIade2002 h, 17 m ago

That's a lot of data to lose should it go wrong, basically you have to buy …That's a lot of data to lose should it go wrong, basically you have to buy two drives to be safe or have somewhere else you can dump your data.


Why does this keep coming up on every thread? These are not normal consumer drives, anyone buying this will know backup strategies and how to protect their data.
This is designed for nearline datacentres, so why would anybody buy this for use at home? If you buy one, there is no backup. If you buy two, you have a backup (or redundancy), but you spend 700 pounds on 12 TB of storage.

I would rather set up a 4 drive RAID5 NAS, where you get 12 TB (with raid) for under 400 pounds.

This drive only makes sense if you need more storage, for example because your RAID5 is full. Do you really need a datacentre at home?
Chuggee46 m ago

Personally I'd pay the extra £8 not to deal with eBuyers terrible partial …Personally I'd pay the extra £8 not to deal with eBuyers terrible partial refund service. Absolutely appalling, especially considering one of their employee performance targets is "rejected RMAs".


Haha, that was a classic. For anyone not familiar, here's the story.
Chuggee59 m ago

Personally I'd pay the extra £8 not to deal with eBuyers terrible partial …Personally I'd pay the extra £8 not to deal with eBuyers terrible partial refund service. Absolutely appalling, especially considering one of their employee performance targets is "rejected RMAs".


That's the smart/ cost effective option for most people that just want some extra storage/ mini server with some redundancy in case one of the drives fail. The reason for the cost increase on these is their reliability, warranty, much greater storage density, less power usage and therefore cooling these drives is much easier.

I totally agree with you with the 4 4tb drives over 2 of these any day of the week, especially on the costs alone. I'm just saying people have different needs and this site has a crap load of people on it, so there's something for everyone on here
Chuggee1 h, 2 m ago

Personally I'd pay the extra £8 not to deal with eBuyers terrible partial …Personally I'd pay the extra £8 not to deal with eBuyers terrible partial refund service. Absolutely appalling, especially considering one of their employee performance targets is "rejected RMAs".


Really? I found they were quite difficult to deal with and needed lots of emailing to finally refund me the postage charge. I put it down to that particular person I was dealing with.

What is your source for that info re: rejected RMA targets?
Cold! I need 50tb!
Chuggee1 h, 19 m ago

Personally I'd pay the extra £8 not to deal with eBuyers terrible partial …Personally I'd pay the extra £8 not to deal with eBuyers terrible partial refund service. Absolutely appalling, especially considering one of their employee performance targets is "rejected RMAs".


You and me and a whole lot of other informed people. eBuyer make BTShop look like a professional outfit.
Warranty isn't much use when all your data is lost. I use two portable 2tb hard drives to back up my data, with a 3rd for the important stuff. Stored in different locations, you never know !!!

I've had a hard drive fail in a Dell computer, luckily most was backed up. You can't trust anything with moving parts.
Just had a 4TB External WD HD fail - completely put me off the brand.
Edited by: "Broadsands" 27th Jan
Broadsands15 m ago

Just had a 4GB External WD HD fail - completely put me off the brand.


*4TB?
hamzahuk3 m ago

*4TB?



Yes, sorry! Amended now - 4TB of data - most of which was backed up fortunately (but not all) on a another drive. Now I'm worried about that one failing, too!
Broadsands19 m ago

Just had a 4TB External WD HD fail - completely put me off the brand.


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bikerboytone1 m ago

[Image]


Apologies...see you've changed this to TB now!
12TB - eggs in one basket springs to mind!
MrPuddington4 h, 36 m ago

This is designed for nearline datacentres, so why would anybody buy this …This is designed for nearline datacentres, so why would anybody buy this for use at home? If you buy one, there is no backup. If you buy two, you have a backup (or redundancy), but you spend 700 pounds on 12 TB of storage. I would rather set up a 4 drive RAID5 NAS, where you get 12 TB (with raid) for under 400 pounds.This drive only makes sense if you need more storage, for example because your RAID5 is full. Do you really need a datacentre at home?


The first solution would get you a backup. The second solution wouldn't...
FireBIade2007 h, 50 m ago

That's a lot of data to lose should it go wrong, basically you have to buy …That's a lot of data to lose should it go wrong, basically you have to buy two drives to be safe or have somewhere else you can dump your data.


This comment is on almost every HDD deal. The size of the drive is completely irrelevant, if your data is precious to you then you have to backup and therefore have a proper backup solution.
john_sekula5 h, 32 m ago

12TB - eggs in one basket springs to mind!


Good job its a feather lined titanium basket then!
Lol not worth it.
MrPuddington11 h, 15 m ago

This is designed for nearline datacentres, so why would anybody buy this …This is designed for nearline datacentres, so why would anybody buy this for use at home? If you buy one, there is no backup. If you buy two, you have a backup (or redundancy), but you spend 700 pounds on 12 TB of storage. I would rather set up a 4 drive RAID5 NAS, where you get 12 TB (with raid) for under 400 pounds.This drive only makes sense if you need more storage, for example because your RAID5 is full. Do you really need a datacentre at home?


However, your solution doesn't work if you have a 2 bay NAS or a small PC with <4 free HDD bays, which is when large capacity single drives are needed.

So many assumptions always thrown around when a large capacity HDD is posted... everyone should rate a deal on the product and price, not whether it is the correct product for someone else to buy when you don't now need or circumstances.
Chuggee16 h, 58 m ago

Personally I'd pay the extra £8 not to deal with eBuyers terrible partial …Personally I'd pay the extra £8 not to deal with eBuyers terrible partial refund service. Absolutely appalling, especially considering one of their employee performance targets is "rejected RMAs".



I couldn't agree more. I wouldn't give these clowns a penny, their refund policy is atrocious.
BustaLinx12 h, 22 m ago

The first solution would get you a backup. The second solution wouldn't...


I believe you’ll find it would.
jazlabs57 m ago

I believe you’ll find it would.


No, they’re right it wouldn’t!

RAID is not backup, it gives redundancy (except RAID 0) but that merely protects you from a drive failure and nothing else! It doesn’t help for fire, theft, silent corruption, accidental deletion/overwrite, ransomware, lightning strike, flood etc.

RAID is designed to prevent downtime not to protect data!
12 TB HDD A Risk Too Far. E-BUYER Far Too Risky
They tried to give me a partial refund on a defective Corsair keyboard which was still under the manufacturer warranty.

I played hard ball and threatened to take them to court (and I would have done) and they eventually refunded in full.

Would never use them again.
That's a pretty good price, if they are equivalent in reliability with the HGST drives. The 6TB HGST HUS726060ALE610 drives I have in my NAS are still retailing at around £202 each from SPAN at the moment (although I know that Amazon UK have some for £150 right now, but although they are listed as new, there's always the chance they are server pulls at that price - and some of the reviews appear to bear that out).

Again, yes, Amazon have these listed at not much dearer, but elsewhere, such as SPAN, they are still £471 each. If you can put up with eBuyer,then good price. I think I'd go with Amazon though, if I could find one on Prime, just in case of unscrupulous sellers shifting drives with usage time already on them.
Would it not be better to have two separate hard drives ? I wouldn't risk putting that much storage on one device
fishmaster18 h, 42 m ago

This comment is on almost every HDD deal. The size of the drive is …This comment is on almost every HDD deal. The size of the drive is completely irrelevant, if your data is precious to you then you have to backup and therefore have a proper backup solution.


And back in the real world people keep losing their data because they don't do this.Are you seriously telling me you have never heard of anyone losing some data?
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