WD-40 400ml £1.00 @ Asda
944°Expired

WD-40 400ml £1.00 @ Asda

30
Found 28th Sep 2014
Hi, picked up some cheap deal on WD-40 400ml at Local ASDA Burton On Trent few weeks ago. wanted to get some more, but no stock. Checked today and box full on the shelf with no price. £3 for the 200ml can, nothing for the 400ml's. took one to checkout and scanned for £1. £4.99 at screwfix. Could not find online. Worth checking if you see any instore. Barcode 5032227440043

29 Comments

for a pound, you really can't go wrong.

fraser87

for a pound, you really can't go wrong.



Unless you spray the can in your mouth, that would be going wrong. So don't do that and you're ok I reckon, and don't spray it near an open flame, that's another way things can go wrong.

fishmaster

don't spray it near an open flame, that's another way things can go wrong.


You're right, GT85 burns much better!

Hot if you can find some btw.
Edited by: "si36912" 28th Sep 2014

I was just in Asda the other day, wish I had known because my can is nearly empty.

Many thanks for the heads up, I got what seemed to be the last one in Warrington Cockhedge.

I'm still using the can I bought back in 1978.

http://i.imgur.com/4NPtxDk.gif

mans best friend, don't have to feed/walk it either

fraser87

for a pound, you really can't go wrong.



If you try and use it as a permanent lubricant like a lot of people do, you can.

WD-40 is for freeing off corrosion on joints or screws etc and dispersing water/cleaning. It's very light, and as soon as the propellant evaporates after a short while it leaves the joints with only a very thin coat of very thin oil, mostly degreased.

If you want to fix a creaky door or anything that needs lubrication, then you will probably need some spray grease instead. Silicone for plastics and rubber because it doesn't attack them, a metal based one like copper/lithium based for metals typically.

Brilliant for cleaning disc brakes...........increases braking distance by about 500%


We used to secretly spray WD40 on each others bike wheel rims for a laugh

Back in the days when cars had distributor caps and rotors drivers never left home without this stuff
Edited by: "WaftyCranker" 29th Sep 2014

vulcanproject

If you try and use it as a permanent lubricant like a lot of people do, … If you try and use it as a permanent lubricant like a lot of people do, you can.WD-40 is for freeing off corrosion on joints or screws etc and dispersing water/cleaning. It's very light, and as soon as the propellant evaporates after a short while it leaves the joints with only a very thin coat of very thin oil, mostly degreased.If you want to fix a creaky door or anything that needs lubrication, then you will probably need some spray grease instead. Silicone for plastics and rubber because it doesn't attack them, a metal based one like copper/lithium based for metals typically.


Erm...thanks

vulcanproject

If you try and use it as a permanent lubricant like a lot of people do, … If you try and use it as a permanent lubricant like a lot of people do, you can.WD-40 is for freeing off corrosion on joints or screws etc and dispersing water/cleaning. It's very light, and as soon as the propellant evaporates after a short while it leaves the joints with only a very thin coat of very thin oil, mostly degreased.If you want to fix a creaky door or anything that needs lubrication, then you will probably need some spray grease instead. Silicone for plastics and rubber because it doesn't attack them, a metal based one like copper/lithium based for metals typically.



I found that to be a helpful comment.

BenderRodriguez



Oh man! .. thats beautiful! lol .. me gotta definately 'try' this one ..... hahaha ...

Good one lol. :-)

vulcanproject

If you try and use it as a permanent lubricant like a lot of people do, … If you try and use it as a permanent lubricant like a lot of people do, you can.WD-40 is for freeing off corrosion on joints or screws etc and dispersing water/cleaning. It's very light, and as soon as the propellant evaporates after a short while it leaves the joints with only a very thin coat of very thin oil, mostly degreased.If you want to fix a creaky door or anything that needs lubrication, then you will probably need some spray grease instead. Silicone for plastics and rubber because it doesn't attack them, a metal based one like copper/lithium based for metals typically.



It's pretty terrible at freeing stuck nuts and bolts as well to be honest. If you need to free rusted parts then buy a proper penetrating fluid like plus gas. WD40 is a seen as being a must have for everyone but it's not actually very useful for many things. Agree it's terrible as a lubricant too. The only things I use it for are cleaning and occasionally a quick spray on power tools to stop chucks rusting.

if you have a creaky doors or hinges on anything else, try cheap furniture polish. usually works a treat and it's like 30p a can. some strange replies to my first comment, haha. I probably won't be using it as a way of freshing my breath by spraying it in my mouth. and I know very well it's not a permanent lubricant (I use it a lot as I'm a joiner) use it in windows, doors etc. but for a pound, it's a good price.

just search 1001 ways to use Wd-40, then people can decide if it's crap or not.
I personally think it's great stuff and always keep a can in my van!

erjin999

I found that to be a helpful comment.



Me too. :-)

wd40 zzzzzzzzzz

perfect for freeing up those nuts on my old skateboard trucks! hot

As vulcanproject says WD40 is designed to release stuck items not as a long term lubricant. It contains solvents that help it work its way into a joint but these solvents evaporate leaving a sticky residue. So instead of being a lubricant it will actually cause things to stick.

So the tip is don't use WD-40 as a general purpose lubricant, use machine oil or something like 3-in-one that will provide proper long term lubrication of moving parts. Use WD-40 to release something when it is stock but them wipe as much of it off as possible and put proper lubrication oil on the mechanism.

Many times I have seen people have problems with things that they think they have taken great care of by regularly 'lubricating' with WD-40 when what has actually happened is that the solvent in the WD-40 has displaced the existing lubricant and left a sticky residue.
Edited by: "Going_Digital" 29th Sep 2014

Hot, great for stopping squirrels stealing your bird nuts apparently:

wd40.co.uk/use…tml

I have found it to be quite useful for lighting fires. It is flammable but less so than petrol or deodorant or something.

This is probably terrible advice, you should ignore this post.

I know this is not such a bargain as it's only 300ml but it is good and it is available all year round
poundshop.com/dp6…0ml

Be a miracle if any were else,misprice?
Edited by: "morrig" 29th Sep 2014

Going_Digital

Many times I have seen people have problems with things that they think … Many times I have seen people have problems with things that they think they have taken great care of by regularly 'lubricating' with WD-40 when what has actually happened is that the solvent in the WD-40 has displaced the existing lubricant and left a sticky residue.



Indeed WD-40 is a penetrant and degreaser. If you use it on something with existing lubrication you will probably flush it away and cause damage if you don't replace it with new lubricant. It's ideal to clean something up like metal hinges or whatever but just make sure you finish the job with a squirt of proper grease like a white lithium or similar.

A lot of people dump it all over their bicycles which makes it nice and clean, fantastic, but it's worse than useless for lubricating all the moving components. Grease is required.

WD40 is basically just fish oil !

works very well for cleaning titanium

Gonna get a few of these for throwing into the bonfire.

hunchback

Gonna get a few of these for throwing into the bonfire.



Oh dear ...
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