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WD Blue 1TB 3D NAND SSD M.2 2280 £83.51 (using code) @ Ebuyer / Ebay
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WD Blue 1TB 3D NAND SSD M.2 2280 £83.51 (using code) @ Ebuyer / Ebay

£83.51£96.6814%eBay Deals
16
Posted 6th Dec 2019

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Use code PARTYTIME for this price.

Features

• 3D NAND SATA SSD for capacities up to 2TB1 with enhanced reliability.
• An active power draw up to 25% lower2 than previous generations of WD Blue SSD.
• Sequential read speeds up to 560MB/s and sequential write speeds up to 530MB/s.3
• An industry-leading 1.75M hours mean time to failure (MTTF)4 and up to 500 terabytes written (TBW)5 for enhanced reliability.
• WD F.I.T. Lab™ certification for compatibility with a wide range of computers.
• Free downloadable software to monitor the status of your drive and clone a drive, or backup your data.
• Includes a 3-year limited warranty so upgrading your storage is worry-free.

The WD Blue™ 3D NAND SATA SSD utilizes 3D NAND technology for capacities up to 2TB1 with enhanced reliability. Featuring an active power draw up to 25% lower2 than previous generations of WD Blue SSDs, you’re able to work longer before recharging your laptop, while sequential read speeds up to 560MB/s and sequential write speeds up to 530MB/s give the speed you want for your most demanding computing applications.3 Combined with the free, downloadable WD SSD Dashboard software and a 3-year limited warranty, you can confidently upgrade your system to the WD Blue 3D NAND SATA SSD.

High capacity with enhanced reliability


A WD Blue 3D NAND SATA SSD uses 3D NAND technology not only for higher capacities (up to 2TB1) than the previous generation WD Blue SSDs, but also to help reduce cell-to-cell interference for enhanced reliability.

Enhanced power efficiency


Offering improved endurance, a WD Blue 3D NAND SATA SSD features an active power draw up to 25% lower2 than previous generations of WD Blue SSDs. And with less power used, you’re able to work longer before recharging your laptop.

Superior performance for high-end computing


For a variety of computing applications like gaming, HD media playback, or creative software, look to WD Blue 3D NAND SATA SSDs. Western Digital™ 3D NAND technology helps enable sequential read speeds up to 560MB/s and sequential write speeds up to 530MB/s for fast system boot-ups, quick application responses, and rapid transfer speeds.3

Leading-edge reliability

An SSD is designed with no moving parts to help protect against data loss if it is accidentally bumped or dropped. And with 1.75M hours MTTF (mean time to failure),4 up to 500 TBW (terabytes written),5 and several error correction technologies, WD Blue 3D NAND SATA SSDs can help guard data for years to come.

Broad compatibility

With a certification from the WD Functional Integrity Testing Lab (F.I.T. Lab™), every WD Blue 3D NAND SATA SSD is verified for compatibility with a wide range of desktop and laptop computers. Every WD Blue 3D NAND SATA SSD goes through extensive compatibility and reliability testing to ensure it meets the high standards of the WD Brand.

Downloadable WD SSD Dashboard and Acronis software

Monitor your drive’s available capacity, operating temperatures, SMART attributes and more with the WD SSD Dashboard. Acronis® True Image™ WD Edition software, available as a free download, can clone drives and backup your operating system, applications, settings and all of your data.

3-year limited warranty6

Every WD Blue 3D NAND SATA SSD comes with a 3-year limited warranty, so you can be confident of your storage when you upgrade or replace any of your drives.

Capacity
2TB, 1TB, 500GB, 250GB

Interface
SATA 6Gb/s

Form Factor
2.5 Inch 7mm
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Top comments
Rimi06/12/2019 18:43

Read/write speeds are crap for M.2 SSD.


It's SATA, this is standard speed for a SATA interface. It is not an NVME.
16 Comments
Read/write speeds are crap for M.2 SSD.
Rimi06/12/2019 18:43

Read/write speeds are crap for M.2 SSD.


It's SATA, this is standard speed for a SATA interface. It is not an NVME.
If a board has a m.2 mount is it able to take either sata or nvme, physical dimensions aside? Like USB slot can take USB2 and usb3?
Edited by: "Meathotukdeals" 6th Dec 2019
Meathotukdeals06/12/2019 19:02

If a board has a m.2 mount is it able to take either sata or nvme, …If a board has a m.2 mount is it able to take either sata or nvme, physical dimensions aside? Like USB slot can take USB2 and usb3?


You are correct and then u need a usb3 device( like nvme M2) to take advantage of the usb3 software/port otherwise it's usb2(in today's standards.. like M2 SSD)...
Sure not NVME, so it it cheaper to buy regular SSD. See no point to buy this one ..
Heat added for the good discount but I don't see why someone would buy this? Surely if your motherboard has an m.2 slot it can support a PCIE one, which is faster than a sata m.2 and a similar price.

Unless I'm missing something here please let me know, but I don't see why you would buy this.
Edited by: "TurkishTerrier" 6th Dec 2019
Rimi06/12/2019 18:43

Read/write speeds are crap for M.2 SSD.


but very good compared to a magnetic disc.
Edited by: "littlecoupe" 6th Dec 2019
TurkishTerrier06/12/2019 20:03

Heat added for the good discount but I don't see why someone would buy …Heat added for the good discount but I don't see why someone would buy this? Surely if your motherboard has an m.2 slot it can support a PCIE one, which is faster than a sata m.2 and a similar price. Unless I'm missing something here please let me know, but I don't see why you would buy this.


Yes you're forgetting about restrictions.

Firstly, not all motherboards support NVME drives. If you're talking about a modern laptop, I'd say that it probably supports NVME and you should go with that over Sata III as prices are similar and performance is significantly better (although you may not see any major difference in many applications).

Secondly, you can be limited by the motherboard.

Take my motherboard, for example. It has three NVME drive slots.

It's the Gigabyte Z370 AORUS Gaming 7. gigabyte.com/uk/…-10

At the moment, I can only use one of the slots.

Here's why:
-------------------

Expansion Slots
1 x PCI Express x16 slot, running at x16 (PCIEX16)
* For optimum performance, if only one PCI Express graphics card is to be installed, be sure to install it in the PCIEX16 slot.
1 x PCI Express x16 slot, running at x8 (PCIEX8)
* The PCIEX8 slot shares bandwidth with the PCIEX16 slot. When the PCIEX8 slot is populated, the PCIEX16 slot operates at up to x8 mode.
1 x PCI Express x16 slot, running at x4 (PCIEX4)
* The PCIEX4 slot shares bandwidth with the M2P_32G connector. The PCIEX4 slot operates at up to x2 mode when a PCIe SSD is installed in the M2P_32G connector.
3 x PCI Express x1 slots
* The PCIEX1_3 slot shares bandwidth with the SATA3 1 connector. The SATA3 1 connector becomes unavailable when the PCIEX1_3 is populated.
(All of the PCI Express slots conform to PCI Express 3.0 standard.)

------------

My OS is installed in the first NVME slot. It's under the CPU cooler but the SSD heatsink prevents it overheating.

The second NVME slot is underneath the X16. Since I have a 1080ti there, I can't really use the slot underneath as it would overheat.

The third slot shares bandwidth with the X4 and I am using the X4 for a thunderbolt hub. So I can't place it there.

To get around this I bought a PCIE card for the X8 that allows me to connect one NVME and two Sata III drives (this also dropped my GPU to an X8, but that doesn't affect performance).

So at this point I've effectively added two NVME drives and I have a limited amount of Sata ports left (again, due to bandwidth being shared).

So I can add two M2 Sata III drives or 2.5" or 3.5" drives. I'm actually leaning towards replacing the two NVMe drives (256GB and 1TB 960 Evos) with higher capacity drives so that I can increase NVMe storage before I buy Sata drives.

Long story short, there are valid reasons to purchase an M2 SSD. All motherboards and CPUs have restrictions when it comes to bandwidth and we all have to work around them. ?
Great for some Nuc type tiny PCs
TurkishTerrier06/12/2019 20:03

Heat added for the good discount but I don't see why someone would buy …Heat added for the good discount but I don't see why someone would buy this? Surely if your motherboard has an m.2 slot it can support a PCIE one, which is faster than a sata m.2 and a similar price. Unless I'm missing something here please let me know, but I don't see why you would buy this.


Recently bought this for a MacBook Air 2012 upgrade, which only supports sata not nvme.
Edited by: "dmn001" 7th Dec 2019
MA3STRO06/12/2019 23:49

Yes you're forgetting about restrictions.Firstly, not all motherboards …Yes you're forgetting about restrictions.Firstly, not all motherboards support NVME drives. If you're talking about a modern laptop, I'd say that it probably supports NVME and you should go with that over Sata III as prices are similar and performance is significantly better (although you may not see any major difference in many applications).Secondly, you can be limited by the motherboard.Take my motherboard, for example. It has three NVME drive slots. It's the Gigabyte Z370 AORUS Gaming 7. https://www.gigabyte.com/uk/Motherboard/Z370-AORUS-Gaming-7-rev-10#kfAt the moment, I can only use one of the slots.Here's why:-------------------Expansion Slots1 x PCI Express x16 slot, running at x16 (PCIEX16)* For optimum performance, if only one PCI Express graphics card is to be installed, be sure to install it in the PCIEX16 slot.1 x PCI Express x16 slot, running at x8 (PCIEX8)* The PCIEX8 slot shares bandwidth with the PCIEX16 slot. When the PCIEX8 slot is populated, the PCIEX16 slot operates at up to x8 mode.1 x PCI Express x16 slot, running at x4 (PCIEX4)* The PCIEX4 slot shares bandwidth with the M2P_32G connector. The PCIEX4 slot operates at up to x2 mode when a PCIe SSD is installed in the M2P_32G connector.3 x PCI Express x1 slots* The PCIEX1_3 slot shares bandwidth with the SATA3 1 connector. The SATA3 1 connector becomes unavailable when the PCIEX1_3 is populated.(All of the PCI Express slots conform to PCI Express 3.0 standard.)------------My OS is installed in the first NVME slot. It's under the CPU cooler but the SSD heatsink prevents it overheating.The second NVME slot is underneath the X16. Since I have a 1080ti there, I can't really use the slot underneath as it would overheat.The third slot shares bandwidth with the X4 and I am using the X4 for a thunderbolt hub. So I can't place it there.To get around this I bought a PCIE card for the X8 that allows me to connect one NVME and two Sata III drives (this also dropped my GPU to an X8, but that doesn't affect performance).So at this point I've effectively added two NVME drives and I have a limited amount of Sata ports left (again, due to bandwidth being shared). So I can add two M2 Sata III drives or 2.5" or 3.5" drives. I'm actually leaning towards replacing the two NVMe drives (256GB and 1TB 960 Evos) with higher capacity drives so that I can increase NVMe storage before I buy Sata drives.Long story short, there are valid reasons to purchase an M2 SSD. All motherboards and CPUs have restrictions when it comes to bandwidth and we all have to work around them. 😁


Oh wow there is a lot to that!

My bad, I totally forgot about laptop upgrades and multiple NVMe slots.

I guess I was just thinking about my mobo which is a Asus Maximus Hero VII which has the similar troubles of the amount of x16 it can support (if that makes sense, sorry I don't know the correct term).

Thanks for the explanation!
dmn00107/12/2019 02:36

Recently bought this for a MacBook Air 2012 upgrade, which only supports …Recently bought this for a MacBook Air 2012 upgrade, which only supports sata not nvme.


Yeah I totally forgot about laptop upgrades haha! Guess I got more to learn.
TurkishTerrier07/12/2019 09:14

Oh wow there is a lot to that!My bad, I totally forgot about laptop …Oh wow there is a lot to that!My bad, I totally forgot about laptop upgrades and multiple NVMe slots.I guess I was just thinking about my mobo which is a Asus Maximus Hero VII which has the similar troubles of the amount of x16 it can support (if that makes sense, sorry I don't know the correct term).Thanks for the explanation!


You're welcome.

I'm far from being an expert on this. I had to read more about it when I built my pc. I soon realised that all of the motherboards I was considering had restrictions like this.

I'm probably going to build a new pc next year and might for for a bigger board with more PCIE slots as mine are full already. I never thought it would use them up so quickly.

I have the same issues with my board. 1x M2 NVME dedicated, 1x M2 SATA sharing bandwidth with my 4th SATA port at the edge of the board. Currently I have a 256 in the NVME slot (budget at build time), and a 1TB Samsung 840 from an old build for storage. The next upgrade would be to fill the M2 SATA slot which this will do.
Great drives these in real world use this will be faster than a lot of cheap nvme drives.... Heat added...
I would look at the sabrent nvme m.2 rather, I got one for £82 the other day on Amazon, it did go up after that but then back down. It's 3k write and 2.5k read if I remember corresctly
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