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WD My Book 8 TB Desktop Hard Drive - Black - £139.99 @ Amazon (good for NAS)
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WD My Book 8 TB Desktop Hard Drive - Black - £139.99 @ Amazon (good for NAS)

£139.99£145.984%Amazon Deals
37
Posted 7th Mar
Not as good a deal like the one posted a few days ago here for £129.98, but it's the second best price ever according to the camels.

Makes it £17.5/TB compared to £16.25/TB on the previous deal.

I ordered it a few days ago (thanks @andywedge) and it came with a White label WD HDD model WDC WD80EZAZ-11TDBA0 (a debatably re-badged WD RED - you can google for info) that after ~27 hours of endurance testing will go straight into my NAS.

The blurb for whoever wants to use it as an actual external drive:
  • Equipped with WD Backup software for Windows and Apple Time Machine compatibility for Mac
  • Works with acronis true image WD edition software to schedule full system backups
  • Password protection with built-in 256-bit AES hardware encryption
    with WD Security software, just set your own personalised password to
    help keep your content private and safe
  • Millions of people around the world trust their data to My Book
    esktop storage; designed to meet WD's demanding requirements for
    durability, shock tolerance and long-term reliability, we back up (pun
    intended!) the trusted My Book desktop storage with a 3-year limited
    warranty
  • The My Book desktop hard drive can back up your photos, videos, music and documents
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Why do you endurance test a HDD before putting in your NAS?
I do a write+read and verify test of the entire drive. This should hopefully identify any weak sectors or problems with the motors/servo/heads that the drive might have come with as a manufacturing defect.
It's probably overkill, I never came across a drive that did have any problems that were uncovered by this, but I like to do my due diligence and make sure that the drive is ok before I put any actual, important data on it.
Mathew_White07/03/2019 16:28

Why do you endurance test a HDD before putting in your NAS?


Because NAs drives are usually left on 24/7 365 days of the year, they are constant read and written to, most people don’t turn off their NAS drive ( otherwise you might as well use a PC/laptop)

Due to nature of use, not to mention important data people might keep; failure rates of disks can be catastrophic; hence NAS drives usually come with several configurations ; raid 0,1,5,6,10 etc. Some use complete back up so say You have 4 HDD in your Nas- 2 will be available for storage and other two back up so u put say 24 tb (6tb x 4) only 2 of the spaces will be avail to you (12tb), or say raid 5- in 4 HDD if one fails- you can recover all data- as all data is stored equally; so in a 4 x 6 tb setting ONLY about 18 tb is used the rest is used for back up across all for 4 drives.

So if any 1 of the drives fail at the,You can recover all data- BUT if 2 or more drives failat same time ( very very rare) then you lose all your data ( or most of you data will be unrecoverable)

So really for precious data you, you use a raid that’s only uses half your NAS CAPACITY, as 3 of 4 disk failure at the same time is really really really rare unless u blow the whole thing up! Hope this helps.
Edited by: "hr08" 7th Mar
hr0807/03/2019 16:57

Because NAs drives are usually left on 24/7 365 days of the year, they are …Because NAs drives are usually left on 24/7 365 days of the year, they are constant read and written to, most people don’t turn off their NAS drive ( otherwise you might as well use a PC/laptop)Due to nature of use, not to mention important data people might keep; failure rates of disks can be catastrophic; hence NAS drives usually come with several configurations ; raid 0,1,5,6,10 etc. Some use complete back up so say You have 4 HDD in your Nas- 2 will be available for storage and other two back up so u put say 24 tb (6tb x 4) only 2 of the spaces will be avail to you (12tb), or say raid 5- in 4 HDD if one fails- you can recover all data- as all data is stored equally; so in a 4 x 6 tb setting ONLY about 18 tb is used the rest is used for back up across all for 4 drives.So if any 1 of the drives fail at the,You can recover all data- BUT if 2 or more drives failat same time ( very very rare) then you lose all your data ( or most of you data will be unrecoverable)So really for precious data you, you use a raid that’s only uses half your NAS CAPACITY, as 3 of 4 disk failure at the same time is really really really rare unless u blow the whole thing up! Hope this helps.


I use 8tb HDDs in my Nas and have each one backed up to a separate 8tb external HDD.
If Nas drive fails i shouldn't always have the backup.
Mathew_White4 m ago

I use 8tb HDDs in my Nas and have each one backed up to a separate 8tb …I use 8tb HDDs in my Nas and have each one backed up to a separate 8tb external HDD.If Nas drive fails i shouldn't always have the backup.


That’s an absolute safe way of doing it. But costly and over kill!

But some data you can’t put a price on, so yea best way of protection is to copy and store in a safe place. And can even use cheaper say WD blue drives for back up and use WD red/ red pro, black or purple for NAS DRIVES- these dives are significantly more costly!!
Trying to do some research on this drive. Can I take it apart and take the HDD inside of the enclosure out. Re-format and plug it in a normal SATA port? If so, how are these 8TB drives selling for £139 compared to £200+ for a standard 8TB WD Red? Just want to make sure I'm making the right purchase
/r/DataHoarder quotes the 3-2-1 principle:

3 Copies; 2 on different media, 1 off-site.

OP what software did you use to do the break in testing?
Edited by: "Roger_Irrelevant" 7th Mar
Arranx07/03/2019 19:40

Trying to do some research on this drive. Can I take it apart and take the …Trying to do some research on this drive. Can I take it apart and take the HDD inside of the enclosure out. Re-format and plug it in a normal SATA port? If so, how are these 8TB drives selling for £139 compared to £200+ for a standard 8TB WD Red? Just want to make sure I'm making the right purchase


That is called shucking. Normally you need to buy the WD Easystore (from USA) to get a WD Red branded EFAX model. In the UK usually you either get a white label version of the drive called EMAZ which is either a HGST Helium WD80EMAZ-00WJTA0 or a newer traditional air drive if its a WD80EMAZ-00M9AA0 which is a HGST Ultrastar DC HC320.. If you get an EMAZ then some times they have an enterprise SATA power connector which has a feature where the PC can power cycle the drive. In old desktop PSUs this causes the drive not to turn on (usually not a problem with NAS PSUs) but if you have the problem you can work around it with a Sata power adaptor.

These drives are noisy as hell and you wouldn't want to put them in a desktop.
Edited by: "malhal" 7th Mar
hr085 h, 38 m ago

Because NAs drives are usually left on 24/7 365 days of the year, they are …Because NAs drives are usually left on 24/7 365 days of the year, they are constant read and written to, most people don’t turn off their NAS drive ( otherwise you might as well use a PC/laptop)Due to nature of use, not to mention important data people might keep; failure rates of disks can be catastrophic; hence NAS drives usually come with several configurations ; raid 0,1,5,6,10 etc. Some use complete back up so say You have 4 HDD in your Nas- 2 will be available for storage and other two back up so u put say 24 tb (6tb x 4) only 2 of the spaces will be avail to you (12tb), or say raid 5- in 4 HDD if one fails- you can recover all data- as all data is stored equally; so in a 4 x 6 tb setting ONLY about 18 tb is used the rest is used for back up across all for 4 drives.So if any 1 of the drives fail at the,You can recover all data- BUT if 2 or more drives failat same time ( very very rare) then you lose all your data ( or most of you data will be unrecoverable)So really for precious data you, you use a raid that’s only uses half your NAS CAPACITY, as 3 of 4 disk failure at the same time is really really really rare unless u blow the whole thing up! Hope this helps.


Unless you constantly use it, WoL isn't a bad idea. It's what I use. Sometimes it's on most days but there can be days it's not on at all. Depends on usage obviously
Edited by: "rev6" 7th Mar
Hege07/03/2019 16:36

I do a write+read and verify test of the entire drive. This should …I do a write+read and verify test of the entire drive. This should hopefully identify any weak sectors or problems with the motors/servo/heads that the drive might have come with as a manufacturing defect.It's probably overkill, I never came across a drive that did have any problems that were uncovered by this, but I like to do my due diligence and make sure that the drive is ok before I put any actual, important data on it.


What do you use (software) for this purpose? I have just ordered a pair of 10TB Element drives to shuck. Would be nice to thoroughly test pre-shucking.
indyjukebox08/03/2019 02:20

What do you use (software) for this purpose? I have just ordered a pair of …What do you use (software) for this purpose? I have just ordered a pair of 10TB Element drives to shuck. Would be nice to thoroughly test pre-shucking.



I use Hard Disk Sentinel Pro which I've been using for many years, not only for this purpose. Check out the features. The nice thing is that it's a lifetime license and is works across releases, so you're not stuck using an old version. You can always use the latest version released.

I forgot to mention that obviously, I run the tests before shucking, so in care there's any problem I can easily return the drive. Although, with the My Book drive, I managed to open it without leaving a single mark, breaking any tabs, nothing. So I could potentially put the drive back in if needed, like nothing happened.

I also use a 120mm case fan connected to 5V to blow some air through the enclosure while running the test. Just to move some air around and keep the drive cool.

I've got a 10TB Elements drive arriving today from Amazon too. It should have a WD100EMAZ. I'll confirm the type of drive once it arrives.
malhal07/03/2019 22:10

That is called shucking. Normally you need to buy the WD Easystore (from …That is called shucking. Normally you need to buy the WD Easystore (from USA) to get a WD Red branded EFAX model. In the UK usually you either get a white label version of the drive called EMAZ which is either a HGST Helium WD80EMAZ-00WJTA0 or a newer traditional air drive if its a WD80EMAZ-00M9AA0 which is a HGST Ultrastar DC HC320.. If you get an EMAZ then some times they have an enterprise SATA power connector which has a feature where the PC can power cycle the drive. In old desktop PSUs this causes the drive not to turn on (usually not a problem with NAS PSUs) but if you have the problem you can work around it with a Sata power adaptor.These drives are noisy as hell and you wouldn't want to put them in a desktop.



The WD80EZAZ-11TDBA0 that I got is actually surprisingly silent. It appears to be a helium-filled HGST Ultrastar HE10 that's running at 5400RPM instead of 7200.
Mathew_White20 h, 10 m ago

Why do you endurance test a HDD before putting in your NAS?


Following the well-known MTBF bowl-shaped curve, this eliminates "infant mortality" which is especially relevant as you'll void your warranty after later shucking it
Hege08/03/2019 12:05

The WD80EZAZ-11TDBA0 that I got is actually surprisingly silent. It …The WD80EZAZ-11TDBA0 that I got is actually surprisingly silent. It appears to be a helium-filled HGST Ultrastar HE10 that's running at 5400RPM instead of 7200.



May I trouble you to post a photo of the sticker side of the internal bare drive? (remember to redact the serial number)

Is the cache size of the drive 128MB or 256MB?
Edited by: "bankbandit" 8th Mar
Hege08/03/2019 11:38

I use Hard Disk Sentinel Pro which I've been using for many years, not …I use Hard Disk Sentinel Pro which I've been using for many years, not only for this purpose. Check out the features. The nice thing is that it's a lifetime license and is works across releases, so you're not stuck using an old version. You can always use the latest version released.I forgot to mention that obviously, I run the tests before shucking, so in care there's any problem I can easily return the drive. Although, with the My Book drive, I managed to open it without leaving a single mark, breaking any tabs, nothing. So I could potentially put the drive back in if needed, like nothing happened. I also use a 120mm case fan connected to 5V to blow some air through the enclosure while running the test. Just to move some air around and keep the drive cool.I've got a 10TB Elements drive arriving today from Amazon too. It should have a WD100EMAZ. I'll confirm the type of drive once it arrives.


Thanks, mine arrived today too. Let me know what your internal drive model no is, when you shuck it. I suspect the 10tb will be He drives.
indyjukebox08/03/2019 14:05

Thanks, mine arrived today too. Let me know what your internal drive model …Thanks, mine arrived today too. Let me know what your internal drive model no is, when you shuck it. I suspect the 10tb will be He drives.



I just received it and hooked it up. The drive is a WD100EMAZ-00WJTA0. This too appears to be a helium-filled HGST Ultrastar HE10 that's running at 5400RPM instead of 7200. So it appears it was a good call to go for this over the 10TB My Book and save £13.

For whoever wants to use it as it is, the differences between this My Book are:
- This doesn't come with any software. Which I just immediately delete anyway because it's useless.
- This has a soft power button on the back, above the power and USB connectors, so you can turn it off instead of unplugging it. The My Book doesn't.
- This seems to have better ventilation, the top and bottom sides are 100% grille and the upper two thirds of the back side are a grille as well, with the fins slanted upwards, to allow the heat to escape even better. On the My Book only the top is 100% grille and the bottom is ~80% grille.
- This has an activity led and the My Book doesn't.
I find this surprising, as I was under the impression that the My Book range was supposed to be above the Elements range.

Right. On with the stress test.
bankbandit08/03/2019 12:50

May I trouble you to post a photo of the sticker side of the internal bare …May I trouble you to post a photo of the sticker side of the internal bare drive? (remember to redact the serial number)Is the cache size of the drive 128MB or 256MB?


There you go.
None of the tools I used seem to be able to read any Buffer information. I get either "not reported", nothing, or the whole field missing, depending on the software.
Might be because it's connected on the USB Bus.
The internet says the cache is 256MB though. The same goes for the 10TB WD100EMAZ-00WJTA0
37216279-755mg.jpg

Here are some Crystalmark speeds, for whoever is interested. Note that the measurements have been taken with the drives connected through their respective USB controller to a USB 3.1 port.

8TB WD80EZAZ-11TDBA0:

37216279-2Tzx0.jpg

10 TB WD100EMAZ-00WJTA0:

37216279-uzajB.jpg
Hege08/03/2019 14:56

I just received it and hooked it up. The drive is a WD100EMAZ-00WJTA0. …I just received it and hooked it up. The drive is a WD100EMAZ-00WJTA0. This too appears to be a helium-filled HGST Ultrastar HE10 that's running at 5400RPM instead of 7200. So it appears it was a good call to go for this over the 10TB My Book and save £13.For whoever wants to use it as it is, the differences between this My Book are:- This doesn't come with any software. Which I just immediately delete anyway because it's useless.- This has a soft power button on the back, above the power and USB connectors, so you can turn it off instead of unplugging it. The My Book doesn't.- This seems to have better ventilation, the top and bottom sides are 100% grille and the upper two thirds of the back side are a grille as well, with the fins slanted upwards, to allow the heat to escape even better. On the My Book only the top is 100% grille and the bottom is ~80% grille.- This has an activity led and the My Book doesn't. I find this surprising, as I was under the impression that the My Book range was supposed to be above the Elements range.Right. On with the stress test.


Difference between MyBook and Elements is the MyBook has hardware encryption on the USB board, which to be honest is a real pain because if you are using the disk over the USB interface and then shuck it and use via SATA, the files are not accessible and the disk needs formatted again. Also its very risk to store important files on if the USB board fails, but you can put the disk in another identical WD MyBook enclosure to read the files, because the encryption key is stored on the disk.
Edited by: "malhal" 8th Mar
bankbandit08/03/2019 12:50

May I trouble you to post a photo of the sticker side of the internal bare …May I trouble you to post a photo of the sticker side of the internal bare drive? (remember to redact the serial number)Is the cache size of the drive 128MB or 256MB?


Out of interest, why redact the serial no?
Hege08/03/2019 16:48

There you go.None of the tools I used seem to be able to read any Buffer …There you go.None of the tools I used seem to be able to read any Buffer information. I get either "not reported", nothing, or the whole field missing, depending on the software.Might be because it's connected on the USB Bus.The internet says the cache is 256MB though. The same goes for the 10TB WD100EMAZ-00WJTA0[Image] Here are some Crystalmark speeds, for whoever is interested. Note that the measurements have been taken with the drives connected through their respective USB controller to a USB 3.1 port.8TB WD80EZAZ-11TDBA0:[Image] 10 TB WD100EMAZ-00WJTA0:[Image]



Thanks. Really appreciate your taking the photo. I have seen some of WD drives with cache size printed on the sticker; it's strange they've not in this case.

What temperatures are you getting idle and under load for the 10TB helium drive?
bankbandit20 m ago

Thanks. Really appreciate your taking the photo. I have seen some of WD …Thanks. Really appreciate your taking the photo. I have seen some of WD drives with cache size printed on the sticker; it's strange they've not in this case.What temperatures are you getting idle and under load for the 10TB helium drive?



Yeah, the label doesn't seem to be as pretty or informative as the regular HDD lineup.

The 10TB is currently running a write+read and verify test of the whole disk surface and has been doing so for the past ~8 and a half hours. It's currently laid horizontally with a 120mm case fan connected to a 5V power supply blowing air in from it's "top" side.
The temperature is around 33-34° C (probably varying with room temperature)

37219145-iZO9g.jpg
malhal7 h, 40 m ago

Difference between MyBook and Elements is the MyBook has hardware …Difference between MyBook and Elements is the MyBook has hardware encryption on the USB board, which to be honest is a real pain because if you are using the disk over the USB interface and then shuck it and use via SATA, the files are not accessible and the disk needs formatted again. Also its very risk to store important files on if the USB board fails, but you can put the disk in another identical WD MyBook enclosure to read the files, because the encryption key is stored on the disk.



If it really bothers you that much, you can disable the encryption by severing power (a single pin) to the Winbond chip on the USB board. This can be done really easily with a wire cutter (obviously a one way street to voiding your warranty) or, if you have the right tools and have steady hands, you can do a clean (de)soldering job that can be restored later for warranty claims. This mod also allows you to use the MyBook case as a standard USB3 caddy for any other brand of HDD; otherwise, it's locked to only the model it's supplied with.
indyjukebox08/03/2019 20:54

Out of interest, why redact the serial no?



It's generally a safe practice. You may never know what a malevolent person could do with that information.
Maybe this is not the case, but people could register in some places or claim certain benefits (e.g. prizes) by providing a serial number of a product that they supposedly own.
hr0807/03/2019 16:57

Because NAs drives are usually left on 24/7 365 days of the year, they are …Because NAs drives are usually left on 24/7 365 days of the year, they are constant read and written to, most people don’t turn off their NAS drive ( otherwise you might as well use a PC/laptop)


I understand this is standard practice for a NAS, but is there any disadvantage to turning it off at night, or say, when you know you won't need to access it?I don't know what electricity costs are for a NAS.
Hege09/03/2019 01:14

It's generally a safe practice. You may never know what a malevolent …It's generally a safe practice. You may never know what a malevolent person could do with that information.Maybe this is not the case, but people could register in some places or claim certain benefits (e.g. prizes) by providing a serial number of a product that they supposedly own.


Hope you don't do the same with the registration on your car! :-p
FoSho2 h, 10 m ago

I understand this is standard practice for a NAS, but is there any …I understand this is standard practice for a NAS, but is there any disadvantage to turning it off at night, or say, when you know you won't need to access it?I don't know what electricity costs are for a NAS.


Wear and tear come from power cycling electronics as well as running them. In most cases longer runtime is better than higher power cycle.
DrHotUK48 m ago

Hope you don't do the same with the registration on your car! :-p



Of course I do! Only when I take pictures of it and post them on the internet
FoSho2 h, 31 m ago

I understand this is standard practice for a NAS, but is there any …I understand this is standard practice for a NAS, but is there any disadvantage to turning it off at night, or say, when you know you won't need to access it?I don't know what electricity costs are for a NAS.



My NAS takes several good minutes to shutdown and even more to boot up. I'd find it really inconvenient to have to wait that long every time I need to use it.

Plus the wear and tear mentioned by thomasaroche

It's difficult to say how much electricity a NAS uses as there are so many variables. It's like the length of a piece of string
But let's say that a populated 4-bay NAS uses an average of 30W per hour.( Although I suspect the average to be less, I never measured mine)
30Wh x 24h = 720Wh/day
720Wh x 30 days = 21.6KWh/month
720Wh x 365 days = 262.8KWh/year

Assuming a cost of £0.14/KWh:
10p/day
£3/month
£36.8/year
Funny all this chat about testing the disks.

If anyone has a NAS setup then they know to do scrubs (data/empty sectors or both). If there is a fault, it'll turn up then. This is both mapped by the drive and the FS. When the drives are idling, commonly the spindle motor powers down unless disabled. Yes, most wear & tear takes place on cold boots and power cycling.

I stopped doing a full pretest of the drives and in place put in a good and proactive maintenance schedule. Some will have strong views about it but if you begin to consider drives in a resilient raid container as consumable items then you'll get the idea.
popolou40 m ago

Funny all this chat about testing the disks.If anyone has a NAS setup then …Funny all this chat about testing the disks.If anyone has a NAS setup then they know to do scrubs (data/empty sectors or both). If there is a fault, it'll turn up then. This is both mapped by the drive and the FS. When the drives are idling, commonly the spindle motor powers down unless disabled. Yes, most wear & tear takes place on cold boots and power cycling.I stopped doing a full pretest of the drives and in place put in a good and proactive maintenance schedule. Some will have strong views about it but if you begin to consider drives in a resilient raid container as consumable items then you'll get the idea.



The idea was to test the external drives before taking them out of the USB enclosure, so in case there's a problem you can easily return them.
Even though I very carefully remove the drives from the enclosure, there's always the risk of breaking a tab or leaving a mark on the enclosure, that would most likely be used by the manufacturer to invalidate you warranty, making you the proud owner of a very expensive paperweight.
I'm not that worried about the drives once they are in the NAS.
I completely agree that the drives in a resilient raid container should be treated as consumable items.
Thanks Hege.

Have ordered 4 10TB Elements for my NAS

:-)
popolou09/03/2019 12:13

Funny all this chat about testing the disks.If anyone has a NAS setup then …Funny all this chat about testing the disks.If anyone has a NAS setup then they know to do scrubs (data/empty sectors or both). If there is a fault, it'll turn up then. This is both mapped by the drive and the FS. When the drives are idling, commonly the spindle motor powers down unless disabled. Yes, most wear & tear takes place on cold boots and power cycling.I stopped doing a full pretest of the drives and in place put in a good and proactive maintenance schedule. Some will have strong views about it but if you begin to consider drives in a resilient raid container as consumable items then you'll get the idea.


I think you are missing the emphasis of the context: shucking, warranty.

Most NAS will default to giving a disk the once-over when it's first added, but I'm gussing you are the one to go for the alternaive YOLO option.

While neither is replacement for the other, remember that prevention is better than cure.

I admire your nonchalance, and glad that it's all working out for you so far.
bankbandit55 m ago

I think you are missing the emphasis of the context: shucking, …I think you are missing the emphasis of the context: shucking, warranty.Most NAS will default to giving a disk the once-over when it's first added, but I'm gussing you are the one to go for the alternaive YOLO option.While neither is replacement for the other, remember that prevention is better than cure.I admire your nonchalance, and glad that it's all working out for you so far.


I didn’t think i did. The earlier posts brought up “endurance testing” which I was explaining is unnecessary. A test for dead sectors is fine but a quick ‘once over’ the drive itself isn’t a proven way of exposing future faults - they degrade over time, at any point and an early spot of a failed sector isn’t future-proofing the drive.
Price back up to £156.58
Ok, so was about to buy a 8tb HDD for my NAS at over £200, and found this.....

Basically, just wondering - as soon as I open the enclosure, is the warranty void on the drive?
AlexHaden1 h, 16 m ago

Ok, so was about to buy a 8tb HDD for my NAS at over £200, and found …Ok, so was about to buy a 8tb HDD for my NAS at over £200, and found this.....Basically, just wondering - as soon as I open the enclosure, is the warranty void on the drive?


It should be
AlexHaden4 h, 14 m ago

Ok, so was about to buy a 8tb HDD for my NAS at over £200, and found …Ok, so was about to buy a 8tb HDD for my NAS at over £200, and found this.....Basically, just wondering - as soon as I open the enclosure, is the warranty void on the drive?



Technically, yes. The manufacturer can claim that you tampered with the product.
But if you pry them open carefully, without breaking any tabs or leaving any marks, handle the drive carefully so you wouldn't leave any marks on it (some pc cases can scratch the sides of a drive while sliding it into the bay, without affecting functionality in any way) and preferably use gloves so you wouldn't leave any fingerprints on the drive or the inside of the enclosure (not that anyone could go CSI on you trying to identify YOUR fingerprints, just that there shouldn't be any fingerprints on the inside of the unit), in case of any issues, you should be able to put the drive back into the enclosure like nothing ever happened :).
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