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Wiggins Rouen Junior Road Bike from £150 / £135 with trade in code @ Halfords
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Wiggins Rouen Junior Road Bike from £150 / £135 with trade in code @ Halfords

£135£30055%Halfords Deals
Expert (Beta) 41
Posted 23rd Jul 2019

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Wiggins Rouen road bikes on offer with free delivery



3 bikes in this range...

Wiggins Rouen Junior Road Bike - 540c Wheel
- Was £300 now £150.00 (£135 using code TRADEIN10 )

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Wiggins Rouen Junior Road Bike - 650c Wheel- Was £328, now £180 (or £162 using code TRADEIN10 )


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Wiggins Rouen Junior Road Bike - 700c- Was £360, now £200 (or £180 using code TRADEIN10 )


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Built with freedom at the front of mind, the Wiggins Rouen Junior 700c Road Bike is a road-racing machine for kids who can't get enough of the exhilaration that cycling brings. Weighing only 9.9kg, this lightweight bike features 16 speed Shimano gears powered by combined Shimano Claris levers, making it the perfect bike for kids who want to push themselves harder, and then keep going. Tektro dual pivot caliper brakes provide reliable and responsive stopping power, and the 700c Kenda road tyres create a swift and speedy ride. Whether your child wants to make it to the top or just relishes the sheer freedom that cycling brings, the Rouen will help them get there.Wiggins Rouen Junior Road Bike - 700c

  • Suitable for children aged 11+
  • Available in two sizes 43cm / 17" or 48cm / 19"
  • Approximate weight: 9.9kg
  • Super lightweight double butted and profiled aluminium frame with road-specific geometry
  • Signature Wiggins reverse 'curved' aluminium fork
  • 16 speed Shimano Claris gears with combined Shimano Claris brake and gear levers
  • Tektro dual pivot caliper brakes for responsive stopping power
  • Components designed to ensure they are perfectly sized, including; saddle, handlebars, stem, crank lengths and pedals
  • 700c x 23 Kenda road tyres on lightweight alloy rims
  • Quick release front and rear wheels
  • Also includes flat pedals with removable toe clips and water bottle bosses

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You can also save a further 3% using HSBC visa card to purchase (HSBC Visa Offers)

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Top comments
chocci24/07/2019 07:56

Tell that to my aunt who was knocked over on the pavement by a 12 year …Tell that to my aunt who was knocked over on the pavement by a 12 year old. Broke her leg and spent 3 days in hospital and on crutches for 3 months.


I appreciate that this is very unfortunate for your aunt, who I hope has made a full recovery, but I'm afraid that over 18,000 cyclists are injured on the roads every year, with 3,500 being seriously injured or killed, and the vast majority of these involve a vehicle of some description. The number of pedestrians killed and injured by cyclists is almost miniscule by comparison, so while there may be an element of risk involved in allowing cyclists on pavements, a cold view of the statistics suggests that it would make a material improvement to overall road casualties.
comes with a british cycling approved inhaler.
Avatar
deleted2115508
chocci24/07/2019 07:56

Tell that to my aunt who was knocked over on the pavement by a 12 year …Tell that to my aunt who was knocked over on the pavement by a 12 year old. Broke her leg and spent 3 days in hospital and on crutches for 3 months.


Plenty of kids ride on the road to and from school here. I'd far rather they rode on the pavement as cars and buses completely ignore parkjng and road regulations, parking on double yellow and zig zag lines, and sometimes block the road- it would be much safer for them to use the pavement.

Sorry for your aunt but the facts just don't stack up
chocci24/07/2019 05:29

Isn't kids and "Road" bikes an oxymoron? They all seem to ride on the …Isn't kids and "Road" bikes an oxymoron? They all seem to ride on the pavement around my way.


Plenty of cycle clubs and junior circuit racing going on for kids. Bikes like this are an excellent entry-level step into this world and, from my experience, once kids have had a go at it, they very quickly get the bug and want to do more!

Also, is it really so bad if kids ride on the pavements from time to time? Surely better than them being in with the traffic, especially when not with adults.
41 Comments
Avatar
deleted2115508
Great prices, but don't you have to trade in an old bike to get it for another 10% off with the code?
Wow, great deals
Room for a jiffy bag?

Only joking. Heat added.
Great value, first road bikes for kids. Heated!
Great spot, may take my step lad down to our local branch and have a look
Great price..
comes with a british cycling approved inhaler.
mcrobbj23/07/2019 14:57

comes with a british cycling approved inhaler.


Delivered in very discrete packaging...
Am around 165cm and thinking of getting this esp as it has 700cc wheels
RedAnnette23/07/2019 18:52

Am around 165cm and thinking of getting this esp as it has 700cc wheels


They're not cubed wheels
Unfitguy23/07/2019 14:48

Great spot, may take my step lad down to our local branch and have a look


When you trade him in for a bike...

Make sure to use the code TRADEIN10
Isn't kids and "Road" bikes an oxymoron? They all seem to ride on the pavement around my way.
chocci24/07/2019 05:29

Isn't kids and "Road" bikes an oxymoron? They all seem to ride on the …Isn't kids and "Road" bikes an oxymoron? They all seem to ride on the pavement around my way.


Plenty of cycle clubs and junior circuit racing going on for kids. Bikes like this are an excellent entry-level step into this world and, from my experience, once kids have had a go at it, they very quickly get the bug and want to do more!

Also, is it really so bad if kids ride on the pavements from time to time? Surely better than them being in with the traffic, especially when not with adults.
daern24/07/2019 07:49

is it really so bad if kids ride on the pavements from time to time? …is it really so bad if kids ride on the pavements from time to time? Surely better than them being in with the traffic, especially when not with adults.


Tell that to my aunt who was knocked over on the pavement by a 12 year old. Broke her leg and spent 3 days in hospital and on crutches for 3 months.
Edited by: "chocci" 24th Jul 2019
chocci24/07/2019 07:56

Tell that to my aunt who was knocked over on the pavement by a 12 year …Tell that to my aunt who was knocked over on the pavement by a 12 year old. Broke her leg and spent 3 days in hospital and on crutches for 3 months.


I appreciate that this is very unfortunate for your aunt, who I hope has made a full recovery, but I'm afraid that over 18,000 cyclists are injured on the roads every year, with 3,500 being seriously injured or killed, and the vast majority of these involve a vehicle of some description. The number of pedestrians killed and injured by cyclists is almost miniscule by comparison, so while there may be an element of risk involved in allowing cyclists on pavements, a cold view of the statistics suggests that it would make a material improvement to overall road casualties.
RedAnnette23/07/2019 18:52

Am around 165cm and thinking of getting this esp as it has 700cc wheels


Border line I'd say. It's probably about right for you, but will depend on your proportions and how you like your bike set up. For example, I have my seat at a height that means my leg is almost straight when at the bottom of the pedal turn, but I do see people who have their seats set lower so their legs are always bent (I don't think this is as efficient though).
Probably best to go and have a look in store to be sure.
RedAnnette23/07/2019 18:52

Am around 165cm and thinking of getting this esp as it has 700cc wheels


One thing to watch is that, as a junior bike, it is setup accordingly - short reach stem, bars and short (155mm) cranks. You may well fit it, but it will depend on your own body proportions (i.e. do you have short legs, short torso or a bit of both?), but 155mm cranks are pretty short for any adult riders - my long-legged 10yo son rides 155mm cranks on MTB and 165mm on road.

As someone above suggested, best go give it a try first.
Avatar
deleted2115508
chocci24/07/2019 07:56

Tell that to my aunt who was knocked over on the pavement by a 12 year …Tell that to my aunt who was knocked over on the pavement by a 12 year old. Broke her leg and spent 3 days in hospital and on crutches for 3 months.


Plenty of kids ride on the road to and from school here. I'd far rather they rode on the pavement as cars and buses completely ignore parkjng and road regulations, parking on double yellow and zig zag lines, and sometimes block the road- it would be much safer for them to use the pavement.

Sorry for your aunt but the facts just don't stack up
daern24/07/2019 08:08

I appreciate that this is very unfortunate for your aunt, who I hope has …I appreciate that this is very unfortunate for your aunt, who I hope has made a full recovery, but I'm afraid that over 18,000 cyclists are injured on the roads every year, with 3,500 being seriously injured or killed, and the vast majority of these involve a vehicle of some description. The number of pedestrians killed and injured by cyclists is almost miniscule by comparison, so while there may be an element of risk involved in allowing cyclists on pavements, a cold view of the statistics suggests that it would make a material improvement to overall road casualties.


Thanks. She's good now. I just wish the law would either be enforced or amended rather than the current situation.
Also further 10% off with aa discount
daern24/07/2019 08:08

I appreciate that this is very unfortunate for your aunt, who I hope has …I appreciate that this is very unfortunate for your aunt, who I hope has made a full recovery, but I'm afraid that over 18,000 cyclists are injured on the roads every year, with 3,500 being seriously injured or killed, and the vast majority of these involve a vehicle of some description. The number of pedestrians killed and injured by cyclists is almost miniscule by comparison, so while there may be an element of risk involved in allowing cyclists on pavements, a cold view of the statistics suggests that it would make a material improvement to overall road casualties.



I agree with what you say, but I wish we had a decent cycling infrastructure that kept vehicles, pedestrians and bikes apart.
chocci24/07/2019 05:29

Isn't kids and "Road" bikes an oxymoron? They all seem to ride on the …Isn't kids and "Road" bikes an oxymoron? They all seem to ride on the pavement around my way.


Kids can't ride on the pavements where I live. They are all blocked by parked cars.
simon.skidmore24/07/2019 10:47

I agree with what you say, but I wish we had a decent cycling …I agree with what you say, but I wish we had a decent cycling infrastructure that kept vehicles, pedestrians and bikes apart.


Even in places where there is seperation i.e footpath, bike lane, road (checkout Southend seafront on Google maps) I find I'm regularly having to shout look out to dozy pedestrians as they meander across without looking.

I've only just recently started cycling regularly for health reasons but I'm quickly understanding why cyclists seem angry all the time.
Can this code only be used online or in-store too??

I can also use British Cycling club 10% off voucher but that voucher can only be used instore
I bought the hybrid one for my daughter last year. Very nice bike.
stainless7724/07/2019 15:16

Can this code only be used online or in-store too??I can also use British …Can this code only be used online or in-store too??I can also use British Cycling club 10% off voucher but that voucher can only be used instore


Get it ordered for click and collect and go through Quidco while you're at it. Reduced gift cards through edenred if your employer is in their scheme.
Hmmm what's the frame size?

Doesn't say anything about age/height range/sizing

Am confused, I need one 5"2 boy for his birthday, which one do i buy and which size?
Edited by: "Norseg" 24th Jul 2019
daern24/07/2019 08:08

I appreciate that this is very unfortunate for your aunt, who I hope has …I appreciate that this is very unfortunate for your aunt, who I hope has made a full recovery, but I'm afraid that over 18,000 cyclists are injured on the roads every year, with 3,500 being seriously injured or killed, and the vast majority of these involve a vehicle of some description. The number of pedestrians killed and injured by cyclists is almost miniscule by comparison, so while there may be an element of risk involved in allowing cyclists on pavements, a cold view of the statistics suggests that it would make a material improvement to overall road casualties.


Exactly I think the government should rethink, someone getting hit by a bike on a pavement will unlikely kill them but if any age gets hit by a vehicle on a road whilst riding a bike than theyll be seriously injured, good chance of death and permanent life changing injury

Safer for people (Inc adults) to ride on the pavement instead of riding on a road
I wouldn't say a bike is roadworthy, theirs some streets where of course you shouldn't ride on pavements but all roads are dangerous for bikes especially when it comes to cities and roundabouts/4 way streets
In some countries they allow Bikes on Pavements
Edited by: "Norseg" 24th Jul 2019
Norseg24/07/2019 18:48

Exactly I think the government should rethink, someone getting hit by a …Exactly I think the government should rethink, someone getting hit by a bike on a pavement will unlikely kill them but if any age gets hit by a vehicle on a road whilst riding a bike than theyll be seriously injured, good chance of death and permanent life changing injurySafer for people (Inc adults) to ride on the pavement instead of riding on a roadI wouldn't say a bike is roadworthy, theirs some streets where of course you shouldn't ride on pavements but all roads are dangerous for bikes especially when it comes to cities and roundabouts/4 way streetsIn some countries they allow Bikes on Pavements


Except if you read the highway code which is law it's illegal to ride on the pavement ...end of chat !!
harrerdarren24/07/2019 22:02

Except if you read the highway code which is law it's illegal to ride on …Except if you read the highway code which is law it's illegal to ride on the pavement ...end of chat !!


I never said it isn't, I said it shouldn't be illega
I would argue that bikes on roads are more dangerous than a bike being on a path
Edited by: "Norseg" 24th Jul 2019
Shame this is not for adults....
harrerdarren24/07/2019 22:02

Except if you read the highway code which is law it's illegal to ride on …Except if you read the highway code which is law it's illegal to ride on the pavement ...end of chat !!


Sorry, but beg to differ. The highway code is not law and has several elements within it that may or may not be stipulated within law that the highway code isn't.

E.g. Road Traffic Act is law and where stipulated as law the highway code uses the language "Must". It also uses language "Should".

Anyway it is not illegal to drive on pavements completely - if the pavement is not next to a highway for a start this is not stipulated that you must not, there are also plenty of other examples such as shared routes.

It also comes down to common sense which can be lacking by all users at times.
Edited by: "Bertz99" 25th Jul 2019
The amount of abuse I get from motorist, for riding my bike on the road...... Go figure
Norseg24/07/2019 18:48

Exactly I think the government should rethink, someone getting hit by a …Exactly I think the government should rethink, someone getting hit by a bike on a pavement will unlikely kill them but if any age gets hit by a vehicle on a road whilst riding a bike than theyll be seriously injured, good chance of death and permanent life changing injurySafer for people (Inc adults) to ride on the pavement instead of riding on a roadI wouldn't say a bike is roadworthy, theirs some streets where of course you shouldn't ride on pavements but all roads are dangerous for bikes especially when it comes to cities and roundabouts/4 way streetsIn some countries they allow Bikes on Pavements


Where I live there is a circular walkway and there is quite often a cyclist travelling too fast for the mix of adults, children and dogs. Majority are fine however but not sure how to handle the few that are dangerous. This is replicated on pavements. Maybe we are back to requiring bikes to have insurance.
afroylnt26/07/2019 08:14

Where I live there is a circular walkway and there is quite often a …Where I live there is a circular walkway and there is quite often a cyclist travelling too fast for the mix of adults, children and dogs. Majority are fine however but not sure how to handle the few that are dangerous. This is replicated on pavements. Maybe we are back to requiring bikes to have insurance.


Oi oi m8 have you got a license for that bicycle.
johnsquire334:

Even in places where there is seperation i.e footpath, bike lane, road (checkout Southend seafront on Google maps) I find I'm regularly having to shout look out to dozy pedestrians as they meander across without looking.

I've only just recently started cycling regularly for health reasons but I'm quickly understanding why cyclists seem angry all the time.

This is where both cycling infrastructure and culture is needed, as in the Netherlands and Germany. Pedestrians and motorists are aware of and behave accordingly, even where there is not the usual excellent separation infrastructurea, since they usually also cycle. Likewise cyclists here need to also be aware of behaviour that does not help the cause, such as, dare I say it, ignoring red traffic lights (Disclaimer: I cycle to work every day but also drive other times).
afroylnt26/07/2019 08:14

Where I live there is a circular walkway and there is quite often a …Where I live there is a circular walkway and there is quite often a cyclist travelling too fast for the mix of adults, children and dogs. Majority are fine however but not sure how to handle the few that are dangerous. This is replicated on pavements. Maybe we are back to requiring bikes to have insurance.


Oi oi m8 have you got a license for that bicycle.
Also you can get insurance, it just isn't mandatory and it shouldn't be
Even car insurance
Edited by: "Norseg" 26th Jul 2019
Bertz9925/07/2019 17:33

Sorry, but beg to differ. The highway code is not law and has several …Sorry, but beg to differ. The highway code is not law and has several elements within it that may or may not be stipulated within law that the highway code isn't.E.g. Road Traffic Act is law and where stipulated as law the highway code uses the language "Must". It also uses language "Should".Anyway it is not illegal to drive on pavements completely - if the pavement is not next to a highway for a start this is not stipulated that you must not, there are also plenty of other examples such as shared routes.It also comes down to common sense which can be lacking by all users at times.


Forgive me, but as a cyclist you are both correct, and wrong. Yes, the Highway Code does differentiate between SHOULD and MUST, with the latter typically being backed up by law to apply legal penalties for a failure to adhere.

A good example is that cyclists SHOULD "never ride more than two abreast, and ride in single file on narrow or busy roads and when riding round bends". This does not mean that cyclists should ride in single file (very far from it, in fact!), and applies guidelines for when a group of riders may choose to file out, but these are just that - guidelines - and this cyclist will take great care before relinquishing his primary position on a narrow road to allow a motorist to overtake, only doing so when it's absolutely safe for the car to pass and this will be MY decision, not theirs!

But for those elements that are backed with MUST, there is strong legal backing to support it. The particular case you mentioned is pavements, for which the Highway Code is quite unambiguous:

Rule 64
You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement.
Laws HA 1835 sect 72 & R(S)A sect 129

Yes, there are separate considerations made for a "pavement" not attached to a road, but this is more commonly covered by local laws and rules, or those covering rights of way, rather than the road traffic act - e.g. in public parks, or shared spaces. No consideration of "common sense" applies here - for the typical definition of a pavement (i.e. the walkway next to a road), unless it is specifically marked as shared use, or dedicated for cycling, then you cannot cycle on it regardless of your own feelings on the matter.

Personally, I think this law is wrong and would like it to be changed and, when riding with my own kids, I will play fast with it, allowing my kids to ride on the pavement where appropriate (go on then, Mr Policeman, exactly what are you going to charge my kids with that your Chief Super won't laugh at you about?), but I am aware of the law and, for myself, will continue to adhere to it until it is changed.
daern26/07/2019 13:15

Forgive me, but as a cyclist you are both correct, and wrong. Yes, the …Forgive me, but as a cyclist you are both correct, and wrong. Yes, the Highway Code does differentiate between SHOULD and MUST, with the latter typically being backed up by law to apply legal penalties for a failure to adhere. A good example is that cyclists SHOULD "never ride more than two abreast, and ride in single file on narrow or busy roads and when riding round bends". This does not mean that cyclists should ride in single file (very far from it, in fact!), and applies guidelines for when a group of riders may choose to file out, but these are just that - guidelines - and this cyclist will take great care before relinquishing his primary position on a narrow road to allow a motorist to overtake, only doing so when it's absolutely safe for the car to pass and this will be MY decision, not theirs!But for those elements that are backed with MUST, there is strong legal backing to support it. The particular case you mentioned is pavements, for which the Highway Code is quite unambiguous:Rule 64You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement.Laws HA 1835 sect 72 & R(S)A sect 129Yes, there are separate considerations made for a "pavement" not attached to a road, but this is more commonly covered by local laws and rules, or those covering rights of way, rather than the road traffic act - e.g. in public parks, or shared spaces. No consideration of "common sense" applies here - for the typical definition of a pavement (i.e. the walkway next to a road), unless it is specifically marked as shared use, or dedicated for cycling, then you cannot cycle on it regardless of your own feelings on the matter.Personally, I think this law is wrong and would like it to be changed and, when riding with my own kids, I will play fast with it, allowing my kids to ride on the pavement where appropriate (go on then, Mr Policeman, exactly what are you going to charge my kids with that your Chief Super won't laugh at you about?), but I am aware of the law and, for myself, will continue to adhere to it until it is changed.

Hi dearn - often I quite like what you quote although you seem to be going off on a tangent here.

The quote I was referencing was "if you read the highway code which is law" whereas there is a distinction between the highway code and the law that it references rather than being it - as you correctly state it is a guide.

I also cycle and yes your road position can be very advantageous to control what permutations are presented to other road users as viable.

In regard to ambiguity there is plenty which is inherent in any natural language - for a start you have had to begin by defining pavement which is not used within the laws quoted yet the highway code does!

As to common sense it most certainly applies nearly every day - you have given above one perfect example of children using pavements, there are plenty of others where consideration is given for real world aspects where Police will make judgement calls they deem appropriate - to name just a couple more you may have the other end of the spectrum from the young such as elderly or then those with their own challenges that do not take what you or I do for granted.
Bertz9926/07/2019 13:55

In regard to ambiguity there is plenty which is inherent in any natural …In regard to ambiguity there is plenty which is inherent in any natural language - for a start you have had to begin by defining pavement which is not used within the laws quoted yet the highway code does!As to common sense it most certainly applies nearly every day - you have given above one perfect example of children using pavements, there are plenty of others where consideration is given for real world aspects where Police will make judgement calls they deem appropriate - to name just a couple more you may have the other end of the spectrum from the young such as elderly or then those with their own challenges that do not take what you or I do for granted.


There's a really good article from Cycling UK here which goes through this (and much more besides!):
cyclinguk.org/art…ike

...the gist of it is that we're probably both right to some extent. The offence is effectively "driving a carriage on the bit of ground next to the road reserved for pedestrians", which includes cyclists. Fixed-penalty notices were introduced for this 20 years ago, but guidance was introduced saying that discretion should be observed when issuing them, which effectively means that it's probably down to whether the police officer in question likes cyclists or not, but if they decide that they really want to issue you with a ticket, I'm not sure you'd have much of a defence against it.

Have a read of the stuff about riding two abreast and you realise that laws like this will always be an uphill battle against a system that assumes that "might is right" and bikes should always be subservient to cars. Terrible really :-/
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