Unfortunately, this deal is no longer available
Windows 10 Professional £39.99, Home £29.99 from PC Pro Software Store
-180° Expired

Windows 10 Professional £39.99, Home £29.99 from PC Pro Software Store

£39.99PC Pro Magazine Deals
30
-180° Expired
Windows 10 Professional £39.99, Home £29.99 from PC Pro Software Store
Posted 15th Sep 2020

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Buy Windows 10 Professional 1-PC retail license for £39.99 here, or Windows 10 Home 1-PC retail license for £29.99 here. Same deal, previously posted on here, has expired - website currently states that offer is available until 30th September 2020.

Yes, you can get pirated or grey licenses cheaper, no you don't need to point that out in the comments. This is still a good price for what appears to be a reputable source.
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Oh boy, here we go.
Got my code for £3 on eBay.
“Yes, you can get pirated or grey licenses cheaper, no you don't need to point that out in the comments.“


I’d bet my product key that these are sourced from exactly the same place.


Luckily if I’m wrong it only cost £3 so I’m not out of pocket much.
30 Comments
Got my code for £3 on eBay.
Oh boy, here we go.
Ah just what I need on a day like this to cool me off!
“Yes, you can get pirated or grey licenses cheaper, no you don't need to point that out in the comments.“


I’d bet my product key that these are sourced from exactly the same place.


Luckily if I’m wrong it only cost £3 so I’m not out of pocket much.
Sorry OP - posted to death but will always go cold - everyone likes their pirated software instead.
MThommmo15/09/2020 12:31

Got my code for £3 on eBay.


Bought 2 pirated keys from eBay never worked
People get "pirated" and OEM mixed up all the time.

Unlike in the days of windows 95 very, very few "pirated" copies of windows exist anymore, simply because Microsoft can very easily remotely deactivate them. OEM software is abundant and entirely legal - resale may possibly breaking user T&C's which is why it is sometimes refereed to as "grey" but Microsoft have elected not to enforce this.

OEM software is typically provided with a machine (typically bulk enterprise, dell etc..) and the main difference to retail is that it is "one hit", it cannot be re-registered once used, retail licenses can be transferred. The big advantage of OEM is that only costs a couple of quid and depsite what people may claim, perfectly legal.
Edited by: "Tyranicus66" 15th Sep
Tyranicus6615/09/2020 14:00

People get "pirated" and OEM mixed up all the time. Unlike in the days of …People get "pirated" and OEM mixed up all the time. Unlike in the days of windows 95 very, very few "pirated" copies of windows exist anymore, simply because Microsoft can very easily remotely deactivate them. OEM software is abundant and entirely legal - resale may possibly breaking user T&C's which is why it is sometimes refereed to as "grey" but Microsoft have elected not to enforce this. OEM software is typically provided with a machine (typically bulk enterprise, dell etc..) and the main difference to retail is that it is "one hit", it cannot be re-registered once used, retail licenses can be transferred. The big advantage of OEM is that only costs a couple of quid and depsite what people may claim, perfectly legal.


No - not at all. Any non-legitimate key can be considered pirate.

The keys available on Ebay are a mixture of volume license keys (which cannot be sold) and OEM keys (which in 99% of cases cannot be sold).The OEM keys are tied to the original hardware they were installed on, in addition, may organisations combine the OEM keys with their own volume licensing. So for example the OEM key on the hardware is no longer considered valid as the organisation are instead using a volume key for ease of management.

You seem to be getting confused between what is legitimate and what can be activated.
In the same way that if I were to be banned from driving and my license was revoked, should I get into a car it will indeed start and I will indeed be able to drive down the road - just because the key activates does not suddenly make it legitimate.

OEM licenses do not "cost a couple of quid" at all. OEM is around £110 for Professional and £70 for Home - your £3 keys are certainly not legitimate, never before used OEM keys.
Stoofa15/09/2020 14:22

No - not at all. Any non-legitimate key can be considered pirate.The keys …No - not at all. Any non-legitimate key can be considered pirate.The keys available on Ebay are a mixture of volume license keys (which cannot be sold) and OEM keys (which in 99% of cases cannot be sold).The OEM keys are tied to the original hardware they were installed on, in addition, may organisations combine the OEM keys with their own volume licensing. So for example the OEM key on the hardware is no longer considered valid as the organisation are instead using a volume key for ease of management.You seem to be getting confused between what is legitimate and what can be activated.In the same way that if I were to be banned from driving and my license was revoked, should I get into a car it will indeed start and I will indeed be able to drive down the road - just because the key activates does not suddenly make it legitimate.OEM licenses do not "cost a couple of quid" at all. OEM is around £110 for Professional and £70 for Home - your £3 keys are certainly not legitimate, never before used OEM keys.


You seem to be getting confused by what can be legally sold and what is a breach of T&C's to activate. It is perfectly legal to sell an OEM key that you own, although it may breach the software companies terms - that does not make it illegal - hence the "grey".
I got a copy of Office 2016 from Amazon for £16 a few years back. Cleaned my PC out and it says it is no longer a valid key.
If you buy grey, you may possibly only be able to use it once.
Anyone purchased one of these keys from PC Pro Magazine Deals, does say retail licence, just wonder if anyone got a none working key?
Really interest in one myself because i may be building a new 10700k pc soon, not sure how soon seeing the offer runs out end of this month.
Raja_Akhter15/09/2020 13:06

Bought 2 pirated keys from eBay never worked


What was the error? I've bought 3 or so keys and 2/3 worked fine but the 3rd I had to activate via phone activation.

iceburglettuce15/09/2020 15:13

I got a copy of Office 2016 from Amazon for £16 a few years back. Cleaned …I got a copy of Office 2016 from Amazon for £16 a few years back. Cleaned my PC out and it says it is no longer a valid key.If you buy grey, you may possibly only be able to use it once.


Bought Office 365 around 2 - 4 years ago and my account is still going strong - maybe look into 365.
M0nk3h15/09/2020 21:04

What was the error? I've bought 3 or so keys and 2/3 worked fine but the …What was the error? I've bought 3 or so keys and 2/3 worked fine but the 3rd I had to activate via phone activation.Bought Office 365 around 2 - 4 years ago and my account is still going strong - maybe look into 365.


It said invalid key or something
M0nk3h15/09/2020 21:04

What was the error? I've bought 3 or so keys and 2/3 worked fine but the …What was the error? I've bought 3 or so keys and 2/3 worked fine but the 3rd I had to activate via phone activation.Bought Office 365 around 2 - 4 years ago and my account is still going strong - maybe look into 365.


It worked fine until I tried to reinstall it.
It was clearly a non-official key.
I took the “risk” at the time knowing this was likely even though it was through Amazon.
Don’t need now as have a license through my company scheme.
Hi thanks for sharing your first deal @Lipod The previous listing for this offer went hot, link below for further reviews from members

hotukdeals.com/dea…576
Tyranicus6615/09/2020 14:24

You seem to be getting confused by what can be legally sold and what is a …You seem to be getting confused by what can be legally sold and what is a breach of T&C's to activate. It is perfectly legal to sell an OEM key that you own, although it may breach the software companies terms - that does not make it illegal - hence the "grey".


True, but:
(i) there's no right for that OEM key to work
(ii) it's VERY likely that key wasn't obtained through a legal sale, ie. whoever provided it wasn't the actual owner
(iii) a key isn't a valid licence to use. Separate things, usually confused. These cheap deals will be the former, not latter.
adam.mt16/09/2020 20:31

True, but:(i) there's no right for that OEM key to work(ii) it's VERY …True, but:(i) there's no right for that OEM key to work(ii) it's VERY likely that key wasn't obtained through a legal sale, ie. whoever provided it wasn't the actual owner(iii) a key isn't a valid licence to use. Separate things, usually confused. These cheap deals will be the former, not latter.


1) false - The original licence is sold under what has been deemed as a perpetual licence then adding limitations on resale (terms changed in the last decade) is an infringement on your consumer rights and such terms have changed after being found to infringe our consumer rights - twice.

2) Pure speculation

3) Debatable - CAL's are instantiated via keys and are synonymous when collating them under a volume licence agreements
Edited by: "vileda_the_best" 17th Sep
1) The OEM licence lives and dies with the first computer it is applied to. Selling it on doesn't magically unexpire it

2) Yes, but based on the evidence

3) Debatable sure, but it's correct
Edited by: "adam.mt" 17th Sep
adam.mt17/09/2020 15:11

1) The OEM key lives and dies with it's first use. Just because it's been …1) The OEM key lives and dies with it's first use. Just because it's been sold on doesn't mean Microsoft have to re-enable.2) Yes, but based on the evidence3) Debatable sure, but true


If wishing to be precise there is no such thing as an OEM key there is a product key that comes supplied via an OEM.

The product key persists and can be used over and over again with no limitations just as it would be on a motherboard failure.

Was challenged and the terms in place that claimed copyright infringement needed rewriting as they were found to be unlawful. The court explicitly stated what is deemed a perpetual licence with an interesting analogy for a product key supplied by an OEM to that of a car stereo. If Microsoft were not to re enable such, they have been warned, faces the biggest fine ever placed on them to encroach on consumer rights as per your example.

The subsequent change in MS terms were:
"Transfer to a Third Party. The provisions of this section do not apply if you acquired the software in the European Economic Area (EEA) and only transfer it to another person or entity within the EEA, in which case any transfer of the software and the right to use it must comply with applicable law.
"
Which evidence is that you refer to? Those releasing those assets whilst having volume licencing in place was fairly apparent on a number of major outsourcing firms following the above ruling in their year end reporting.

As to if true that would make Microsoft's term of a "Volume Licencing Key" an oxymoron no?
Edited by: "vileda_the_best" 17th Sep
"The product keys persists and can be used over and over again with no limitations" - is this your statement or a ruling; if the latter, do you have a source?

Or at least something to help me locate because that statement has HUGE implications. Eg. a consumer can reuse phone credit or a gift card as many times as they wish, the supplier (as per your argument) can't limit them to one use.

Your later direct quote is not under dispute. I clearly stated that licences could be legally resold.
Edited by: "adam.mt" 17th Sep
adam.mt17/09/2020 17:31

"The product keys persists and can be used over and over again with no …"The product keys persists and can be used over and over again with no limitations" - is this your statement or a ruling; if the latter, do you have a source?Or at least something to help me locate because that statement has HUGE implications. Eg. a consumer can reuse phone credit or a gift card as many times as they wish, the supplier (as per your argument) can't limit them to one use.Your later direct quote is not under dispute. I clearly stated that licences could be legally resold.


with an example of context included in there of a motherboard failing.

Phone credit and gift cards is as silly an analogy as you could go as those are not perpetual goods but rather transient sums.

tbh you seem to be struggling that a product key and a digital licence both technically enable the certifying of the software for your use. How they achieve that is the difference in process.

To quote Microsoft:
"If you don't have a digital license, you'll use a product key to activate."

Feel free to explain how a digital licence can be resold yet not a product key? Also could you also tell me how, if you have a right to resell licences from your machine that you no longer intend to use how you would go about it precisely and what would it be you handed over to someone?

The rulings were in 2012 and 2016 in defining what was perpetual and where Oracles and MS terms were unlawful and centre around Microsoft's pursuit of Soft Home.
vileda_the_best17/09/2020 19:03

with an example of context included in there of a motherboard …with an example of context included in there of a motherboard failing.Phone credit and gift cards is as silly an analogy as you could go as those are not perpetual goods but rather transient sums.tbh you seem to be struggling that a product key and a digital licence both technically enable the certifying of the software for your use. How they achieve that is the difference in process.To quote Microsoft:"If you don't have a digital license, you'll use a product key to activate."Feel free to explain how a digital licence can be resold yet not a product key? Also could you also tell me how, if you have a right to resell licences from your machine that you no longer intend to use how you would go about it precisely and what would it be you handed over to someone?The rulings were in 2012 and 2016 in defining what was perpetual and where Oracles and MS terms were unlawful and centre around Microsoft's pursuit of Soft Home.


Why the straw man arguments?

I've just researched the rulings and they don't appear to contradict my statements. I recommend you read them.

Admittedly phone credit and gift cards usually have expiry dates (transient as you say) and so are bad examples. But what about those that don't (eg. xbox gift cards) or console/Steam/Origin/other electronic redemption keys after they've been used? You've said they can be (sold and) reused but clearly in the majority of cases they cant. Just like Windows OEM licences; only unused may be legitimately sold and used. Unless, of course, you have actual proof of otherwise?
Edited by: "adam.mt" 17th Sep
Paying for Windows... Hahaha it's like paying for winrar!
adam.mt17/09/2020 19:38

Why the straw man argument? Leave the goalposts where they are. Who …Why the straw man argument? Leave the goalposts where they are. Who mentioned digital licences!?I've just researched the rulings and they don't appear to contradict my statements. I recommend you read them.Admittedly phone credit and gift cards usually have expiry dates and so are bad examples. But what about those that don't or Xbox/Steam/other electronic redemption keys after they've been used? You've said they can be (sold and) reused but clearly they cant. Just like Windows OEM licences; only unused may be legitimately sold and used. Unless, of course, you have actual proof of otherwise?


the goal post and your false statements were these two:
"(i) there's no right for that OEM key to work"
followed by
"1) The OEM licence lives and dies with the first computer it is applied to. "

Microsofts own site confirming this be false:
"JUDGMENT OF THE COURT (Grand Chamber)

According to the decision of the European Court (Curia) of Justice on the 3rd of july in 2012, (C-128/11.) the sale of software is permitted even without the physical transport of the medium (CD/DVD/Pendrive). The transfer of the used license activation keys is permitted, furthermore the sale, transfer of the unused software licenses is legal regardless of whether the software license is on a medium or online license activation key. The software company shall not prevent the further sale of its license, and usage of its software, including OEM, DSP and ESD versions. The software company’s copyright is exhausted when its software has been sold for the first time. The individual sale of Volume License and the trading of online transferable licenses are permitted. (C-128/11., EU 2001/29/EG, 28., 2009/24/EK)"


enough proof yet to place your hands up and say you were wrong?
Edited by: "vileda_the_best" 17th Sep
vileda_the_best17/09/2020 19:59

the goal post and your false statements were these two:"(i) there's no …the goal post and your false statements were these two:"(i) there's no right for that OEM key to work"followed by"1) The OEM licence lives and dies with the first computer it is applied to. "Microsofts own site confirming this be false:"JUDGMENT OF THE COURT (Grand Chamber)According to the decision of the European Court (Curia) of Justice on the 3rd of july in 2012, (C-128/11.) the sale of software is permitted even without the physical transport of the medium (CD/DVD/Pendrive). The transfer of the used license activation keys is permitted, furthermore the sale, transfer of the unused software licenses is legal regardless of whether the software license is on a medium or online license activation key. The software company shall not prevent the further sale of its license, and usage of its software, including OEM, DSP and ESD versions. The software company’s copyright is exhausted when its software has been sold for the first time. The individual sale of Volume License and the trading of online transferable licenses are permitted. (C-128/11., EU 2001/29/EG, 28., 2009/24/EK)"enough proof yet to place your hands up and say you were wrong?


No, because it doesn't! I absolutely will admit if shown wrong, I have zero problem with that.

The right to use 'OEM software' is exhausted after it's first use as per Microsoft's T&C that have been agreed to. Whether the licence is resold or not, which this ruling concerns, is irrelevant. There is no right to use the software on a different system.

I believe the ruling doesn't dispute this (I've just looked at it together with some legally qualified opinions); it deals with resale.

If I'm wrong then please explain why Microsoft's OEM terms are as they are. Perhaps you're more legally qualified than them?

"OEM Software may NOT be transferred to another machine.

Even if the original laptop, PC or server is no longer in use, or if the software is removed from the original hardware, the OEM licenses are tied to the device on which the software is first installed.

As long as the license and device remain together, there is no limit to the number of times they may be transferred from one user to another.

When transferring a PC to a new end user, the software media, manuals (if applicable), and Certificate of Authenticity label should be included. It is also advisable to include the original purchase invoice or receipt. The original end user cannot keep any copies of the software.
" source
Edited by: "adam.mt" 17th Sep
Interestingly, the court confirmed that splitting licences, which is what many key sellers do (using MAK keys), is copyright infringement.

Do you have a URL for your quote?
Edited by: "adam.mt" 17th Sep
adam.mt17/09/2020 20:54

Interestingly, the court confirmed that splitting licences, which is what …Interestingly, the court confirmed that splitting licences, which is what many key sellers do (using MAK keys), is copyright infringement.Do you have a URL for your quote?


They did and it is when buying volume licensing or possibly subscription based licencing with MSDN Technet or Visual Studio.

Would be very old hat if you were using MAK keys rather than a key management store with Volume licencing. Further, MAK keys on those subscriptions have changed beyond all recognition in the last 20 years. You can not be talking either the Volume licencing as the installation for that is not openly available.

That is not to be confused with Retail and OEM licencing that is the context here and the installation is freely available to download.

The EU ruling is detailed here:
curia.europa.eu/jcm…pdf

Specifically the nitty gritty is made here:

"Under that directive, the first sale in the EU of a copy of a computer program by the copyright holder or with his consent exhausts the right of distribution of that copy in the EU. A right holder who has marketed a copy in the territory of a Member State of the EU thus loses the right to rely on his monopoly of exploitation in order to oppose the resale of that copy"

"Where the copyright holder makes available to his customer a copy – tangible or intangible – and at the same time concludes, in return form payment of a fee, a licence agreement granting the customer the right to use that copy for an unlimited period, that right holder sells the copy to the customer and thus exhausts his exclusive distribution right. Such a transaction involves a transfer of the right of ownership of the copy. Therefore, even if the licence agreement prohibits a further transfer, the right holder can no longer oppose the resale of that copy."

So the salient points are:
Did the manufacturer agree to its use and take monies for it - yes
Is windows s/w - yes
is it made available freely to download - yes
is the period of time for use limited - no
Can the right holder oppose to that copy being resold - no

At least within the EU and the UK at present.
Can you confirm where that quote you used is from in your previous post?*

I can't find it in the court judgment. What I do read in the judgment doesn't invalidate what I've said.

MAK/KMS - The average end user won't be able to activate Windows/Office with KMS. That's why MAK keys are used by 'grey market' resellers.

(* - The place where I've found it is a post by a random on a Microsoft community forum and it certainly doesn't read like a legal statement)
Edited by: "adam.mt" 2nd Oct
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