Wood fired pizza oven BBQ £89.99 @ B&M bargains (found Exeter, should be nationwide)
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Wood fired pizza oven BBQ £89.99 @ B&M bargains (found Exeter, should be nationwide)

17
Found 18th Jul 2017
Saw this as the Exeter branch, but seen on their website that it's the price all over.
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Does it take wood only or can you put coal?
sydney871

Does it take wood only or can you put coal?



Not sure if you are being serious, or not, but to get it hot enough, you need to use wood, kindling size sticks work best. Coal would probably both not be hot enough and would probably make your pizzas taste yuk. I have tried charcoal, restaurant grade, in my similar one, but it was way too low in temperature.
Why would you?
My friend has one of these, it works but it is far from satisfactory neopolitan pizza. The way a pizza oven is supposed to work is that the majority of the heat comes from the top, with the base where the pizza actually sits getting hot but nowhere near as hot as the dome of the oven. In a proper pizza oven this is facilitated by the use of thick ceramic walls and layers of insulation to keep the dome temperature very very high, such that it radiates on the top of the pizza, and usually by having the hot gases exhaust towards the front drawing them over the pizza. Pizzas can cook in as little as 90 s.

On these cheap metal ovens the base is hotter than the dome, so they have a tendency to burn on the bottom before the top is done, and the dome temperature is rather cool, so it takes ages. I have cooked pizza in my Weber kettle several times, it works but suffers the same issue as this oven, thin uninsulated metal walls lose too much heat, it is hard to drive heat from the top without scorching the bottom.

All in you'll get just as good pizza in a normal charcoal BBQ with a pizza stone. More versatile and as we approach end of season, not much more expensive for a quality Weber BBQ.
DonnyBrago

My friend has one of these, it works but it is far from satisfactory … My friend has one of these, it works but it is far from satisfactory neopolitan pizza. The way a pizza oven is supposed to work is that the majority of the heat comes from the top, with the base where the pizza actually sits getting hot but nowhere near as hot as the dome of the oven. In a proper pizza oven this is facilitated by the use of thick ceramic walls and layers of insulation to keep the dome temperature very very high, such that it radiates on the top of the pizza, and usually by having the hot gases exhaust towards the front drawing them over the pizza. Pizzas can cook in as little as 90 s. On these cheap metal ovens the base is hotter than the dome, so they have a tendency to burn on the bottom before the top is done, and the dome temperature is rather cool, so it takes ages. I have cooked pizza in my Weber kettle several times, it works but suffers the same issue as this oven, thin uninsulated metal walls lose too much heat, it is hard to drive heat from the top without scorching the bottom.All in you'll get just as good pizza in a normal charcoal BBQ with a pizza stone. More versatile and as we approach end of season, not much more expensive for a quality Weber BBQ.



They're are not too bad if you get a good "flamey" fire going. If you try and do it with a big ember fire it doesn't work well because the heat is below the stone. Obviously if you want the best wood cooked pizza, you need a proper pizza oven, but they cost hundreds of spondoolics more. You can get good results with one of these, but you need a fair deal of "balancing" skill, and not everyone can manage that, which combined with the enthusiasm for alcohol, which often accompanies the average British outdoor cooking endeavour, makes it tricky. It can be done though, we've had a few incineration failures, but we have had far more delicious pizzas too - now I have it sussed. If you are up for really thinking what you are doing when you cook, you can get these to work. If you struggle with a microwave, it might not be for you.

Edited by: "VDisillusioned" 19th Jul 2017
VDisillusioned1 h, 49 m ago

They're are not too bad if you get a good "flamey" fire going. If you try …They're are not too bad if you get a good "flamey" fire going. If you try and do it with a big ember fire it doesn't work well because the heat is below the stone. Obviously if you want the best wood cooked pizza, you need a proper pizza oven, but they cost hundreds of spondoolics more. You can get good results with one of these, but you need a fair deal of "balancing" skill, and not everyone can manage that, which combined with the enthusiasm for alcohol, which often accompanies the average British outdoor cooking endeavour, makes it tricky. It can be done though, we've had a few incineration failures, but we have had far more delicious pizzas too - now I have it sussed. If you are up for really thinking what you are doing when you cook, you can get these to work. If you struggle with a microwave, it might not be for you.

You can think about it all you like, it cannot hold enough heat above the cooking surface to make a decent neopolitan style pizza.

Yes it cooks pizza, slowly, but so does a standard charcoal bbq with a lid and pizza stone.
Why are you even comparing this to a traditional pizza oven? Anyone who is familiar with how a traditional pizza is cooked knows this won't be comparitive. Take this for what it is. A cheap beginner alternative, not much more than a bit of prestige for the garden. VDillusioned is right, once you get the balance right. The results aren't too bad. I have one
DonnyBrago7 h, 27 m ago

You can think about it all you like, it cannot hold enough heat above the …You can think about it all you like, it cannot hold enough heat above the cooking surface to make a decent neopolitan style pizza.Yes it cooks pizza, slowly, but so does a standard charcoal bbq with a lid and pizza stone.



If you read my previous reply carefully you will understand how to make a pizza oven like this work. If your friend s trying to use it like a traditional oven then no wonder it takes ages with poor results. Used properly you can cook a perfect pizza in a couple of minutes.
VDisillusioned58 m ago

If you read my previous reply carefully you will understand how to make a …If you read my previous reply carefully you will understand how to make a pizza oven like this work. If your friend s trying to use it like a traditional oven then no wonder it takes ages with poor results. Used properly you can cook a perfect pizza in a couple of minutes.


I suspect our interpretation of perfect differs somewhat.
MyNameSucksBad3 h, 0 m ago

Why are you even comparing this to a traditional pizza oven? Anyone who is …Why are you even comparing this to a traditional pizza oven? Anyone who is familiar with how a traditional pizza is cooked knows this won't be comparitive. Take this for what it is. A cheap beginner alternative, not much more than a bit of prestige for the garden. VDillusioned is right, once you get the balance right. The results aren't too bad. I have one


It's being sold as a pizza oven, so it gets judged as a pizza oven. Point I was making is that it is comparable to a BBQ with a pizza stone, which is about the same price and more versatile.
DonnyBrago3 h, 51 m ago

It's being sold as a pizza oven, so it gets judged as a pizza oven. Point …It's being sold as a pizza oven, so it gets judged as a pizza oven. Point I was making is that it is comparable to a BBQ with a pizza stone, which is about the same price and more versatile.



It's quite obvious now that you haven't actually seen one of these ovens in use, and your friend is presumably a figment of your delusion. You have obviously assumed that to cook a pizza in one of these you light a fire underneath the stone and cook the pizza via heat transmitted through it. This is absolutely not what you do and why a pizza stone in a kettle barbecue will not work. These have a chimney for a reason - so that you can get a strong wood fire going and have the very hot gasses, hundreds of degrees hotter than normal barbecue temperatures, flow up and around the sides of the oven and out through the chimney, quickly cooking the top of the pizza as it goes. In a barbecue you might have a tiny vent in the lid but nothing to make a strong "draw" and theheat would stay down underneath the pizza stone resulting in a disgusting disaster. Only someone who hasn't a clue would consider trying to cook a pizza in a kettle barbecue. On an interesting and related note though, you can also use these as a barbecue grill, and even a smoker in a fashion, though obviously not for long slow smokes, very versatile.
VDisillusioned3 h, 44 m ago

It's quite obvious now that you haven't actually seen one of these ovens …It's quite obvious now that you haven't actually seen one of these ovens in use, and your friend is presumably a figment of your delusion. You have obviously assumed that to cook a pizza in one of these you light a fire underneath the stone and cook the pizza via heat transmitted through it. This is absolutely not what you do and why a pizza stone in a kettle barbecue will not work. These have a chimney for a reason - so that you can get a strong wood fire going and have the very hot gasses, hundreds of degrees hotter than normal barbecue temperatures, flow up and around the sides of the oven and out through the chimney, quickly cooking the top of the pizza as it goes. In a barbecue you might have a tiny vent in the lid but nothing to make a strong "draw" and theheat would stay down underneath the pizza stone resulting in a disgusting disaster. Only someone who hasn't a clue would consider trying to cook a pizza in a kettle barbecue. On an interesting and related note though, you can also use these as a barbecue grill, and even a smoker in a fashion, though obviously not for long slow smokes, very versatile.


I am aware of how the linked pizza oven works, I have eaten from it, it was ok. I described how an actual pizza oven is supposed to work in my first comment, see how they differ? The issue isn't so much the position of the fire as it is the thin steel walls losing too much heat and dome temp being similar to stone temp.

I gave kettle pizza shot because I'd seen others trying it. With the heat source away at the back and the stone propped high into the dome, the results were similar to your oven's. Neither had enough heat from the top for a neopolitan pizza, both took longer than it should because they weren't hot enough. If you think I am wrong, feel free to ask for some opinions on your output on a dedicated pizza making forum.

The oven you bought is not as versatile as a kettle. If you are going to make pizza in the garden badly, you may as well do it on something worth owning.
DonnyBrago

I am aware of how the linked pizza oven works, I have eaten from it, it … I am aware of how the linked pizza oven works, I have eaten from it, it was ok. I described how an actual pizza oven is supposed to work in my first comment, see how they differ? The issue isn't so much the position of the fire as it is the thin steel walls losing too much heat and dome temp being similar to stone temp.I gave kettle pizza shot because I'd seen others trying it. With the heat source away at the back and the stone propped high into the dome, the results were similar to your oven's. Neither had enough heat from the top for a neopolitan pizza, both took longer than it should because they weren't hot enough. If you think I am wrong, feel free to ask for some opinions on your output on a dedicated pizza making forum.The oven you bought is not as versatile as a kettle. If you are going to make pizza in the garden badly, you may as well do it on something worth owning.



I give up. I've tried to tell you how an oven like this works, compared to a traditional oven, and how it is entirely possible to cook very good pizzas in it, but how it is much harder to do than in a traditional oven, and how it's completely different to a kettle barbecue, and how a kettle barbecue couldn't produce results as good as one of these at cooking pizzas, and how you can use one like a barbecue grill, and even how you can use one as a basic smoker. But you haven't used one, so you know best apparently. So stick to your microwave mate, is all I can say to you further.
VDisillusioned3 h, 45 m ago

I give up. I've tried to tell you how an oven like this works, compared to …I give up. I've tried to tell you how an oven like this works, compared to a traditional oven, and how it is entirely possible to cook very good pizzas in it, but how it is much harder to do than in a traditional oven, and how it's completely different to a kettle barbecue, and how a kettle barbecue couldn't produce results as good as one of these at cooking pizzas, and how you can use one like a barbecue grill, and even how you can use one as a basic smoker. But you haven't used one, so you know best apparently. So stick to your microwave mate, is all I can say to you further.


It's junk pal.
DonnyBrago

It's junk pal.



So your imaginary friend apparently told you.
Why are you arguing over whether this makes good pizzas or not? Surely it depends on who is using it? I have no idea on whether either of you are professional chefs, but i do know that i am not. And yet somehow, dispite DonnyBrago telling me that this item is complete junk, i manage to get mine up to 500 degrees and cook a nice wood fired pizza in around 2 to 3 minutes. Im no chef, and im no cooking expert but this thing cooked my pizza to perfection. And i havent had any complaints from the numerous friends who have had pizzas from the oven (around 17 so far). So take from that what you will.

The secret to getting it cokking perfectly, is to start your fire in the middle with a few bits of kindling. This gets the fire going and builds up some temperature in the pizza stone. Then split the fire in to two smaller piles. One on each side of the oven then add more wood. This then gets the heat going around the oven, and not directly under the stone.Front grate half cocked and top vent half cocked. leave until desired temperature is achieved and then close the top vent so only a slight hole is left allowing gases to escape, then do the same with the bottom vent to allow slight heat in. You bottom vent to regulate airflow in order to control temperature.

This is how i do it and it works perfect for me.
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