WORX WX390 20V 3-in-1 H3 Max Lithium-Ion Rotary Hammer £54.99 @ Amazon
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WORX WX390 20V 3-in-1 H3 Max Lithium-Ion Rotary Hammer £54.99 @ Amazon

81
Found 3rd May 2016
This is a great combo drill/driver/hammer sds to have in the house, will tackle most jobs you can throw at it and doesn't drop its charge like those nicd drills.

Best price I've seen for this with 20v 2.0ah battery included.
Currently selling for £79.99 at argos without the battery.
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81 Comments
not half bad
just ordered cheers already have to brushless drill and multi tool brilliant make
Ordered one, thanks for posting.

Don't forget to register the drill on the Worx website, to receive the free 3 years warranty (main body only, battery/accessories are excluded).
Edited by: "SUMMONER" 3rd May 2016
Fantastic price, ordered!
Thank you, been looking for a decent replacement for my really heavy SDS drill that I've had for years... just for some lighter jobs and some screwdriving mainly, this will do nicely
How would you compare this to the Bosch PSB 1800 from the EuroCarParts deal ?
This or a Stanley Fatmax?
Looks good, purchased, thanks scootch.
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KiretoX

How would you compare this to the Bosch PSB 1800 from the EuroCarParts … How would you compare this to the Bosch PSB 1800 from the EuroCarParts deal ?


The worx is more versatile, thisbBosch won't utilise the beauty of SDS drill bits, you may appreciate it once drilling in concrete.

bettz1

This or a Stanley Fatmax?



If you get Stanley with good chuck you will be happy with it. No comparison once drilling in concrete or stone though, SDS is far better then
Edited by: "7777777" 4th May 2016
so it's a drill ?
Thanks, OP. Ordered. Really did need a good cordless drill and more powerful driver. This fits the bill nicely.
knowitall5

so it's a drill ?


Aye, that's a drill but also a driver and a hammer drill so as described by the OP it is combo :). Still don't believe you will get precise results whilst using 2mm bit but you can't have everything. The extra element must add some flex to the system.
Edited by: "7777777" 4th May 2016
Cracking deal.
Looking at the pictures, I don't think this has a rotor stop hammer only function.
Nice find! Thanks!
if your not in a hurry for it..."usually despatched in 1-3 weeks". usually is bit vague. voted hot though re price. cheers
jp007_uk

Can you use normal drill bits with this?


Yes, the blurb on the Amazon site says that it accepts all SDS+ and round shank bits
Couldn't find any details about torque or variable speed settings?
Thanks, ordered to replace my failing bosch 18v where the batteries cost more than the drill
it may accept SDS but I highly down it'll survive when used on concrete
*doubt
Does this have variable torque as can't see it in the specs?

Edited by: "Bal" 4th May 2016
I bought a worx drill last year. Used the battery charger for the 2nd or 3rd time and it did not work. I rang worx customer services as it was still under warranty but they did not have any chargers in stock. they told me I'd have to wait 4-6 weeks. As I had just moved house and needed the drill I had to buy a new one.
I found a charger seller on Amazon, although he didn't have the one I needed in stock he told me he sells loads of worx battery chargers. Cheap rubbish. Avoid at all cost!!!
jp007_uk

Couldn't find any details about torque or variable speed settings?


No load speed given as 0-900 rpm nothingelse listed on the Worx website or within the downloadable user manual, perhaps that says something. Still an excellent price though.
Ordered, thanks
manual is here for those interested:
https://images.worx.com/multi-lang-manuals/ne-5l-wx390wx390.1wx390.9-141125.pdf

Key stats really are the weight (1.6 kg) and the impact energy (1.2 J). The impact energy is a little low for tools of this class (18V Makita's and the like will be generating in the order of 2 joules, which will speed up drilling a lot - but starting at 4 times the price). The weight is very low though - which should mean it's good to use on off a ladder etc. The loss of rotation stop isn't really a big deal either - 1.2 J is really too low to try and do any chiseling anyway.

I've ordered one as it appears to be a steal at this price. I'll probably also pick up a second small battery too - apparently the Erbauer ones from Screwfix fit, and the 2 Ah is only 20 quid there (http://www.screwfix.com/p/erbauer-eri621bat-18v-2-0ah-li-ion-battery/8352g). I'm hoping it'll fill the gap between my 10.8v drill/drivers (which are amazing but start to struggle above 8mm in brick) and my corded SDS beast (which is very heavy and overpowered for many uses).
Good masonry drill although only a 2Ah battery. There seems to be a general trend to fit SDS chucks into fairly low power tools. I guess the benefit here is you can fit a screwdriver bit to the standard chuck and quickly swop between drilling the hole and then driving the screw in by removing and refitting the chuck adapter. It looks like one of those tools that could frustrate with its low power and small capacity battery.
KiretoX

How would you compare this to the Bosch PSB 1800 from the EuroCarParts … How would you compare this to the Bosch PSB 1800 from the EuroCarParts deal ?



depends what you want it for... bare in mind that an SDS chuck is engineered to have more play in it than a standard chuck so is not as precise
bettz1

This or a Stanley Fatmax?



see above
CrazyBob

Looking at the pictures, I don't think this has a rotor stop hammer only … Looking at the pictures, I don't think this has a rotor stop hammer only function.



nope... however most small sds systems don't.
lilbeastie

manual is here for those … manual is here for those interested:https://images.worx.com/multi-lang-manuals/ne-5l-wx390wx390.1wx390.9-141125.pdfKey stats really are the weight (1.6 kg) and the impact energy (1.2 J). The impact energy is a little low for tools of this class (18V Makita's and the like will be generating in the order of 2 joules, which will speed up drilling a lot - but starting at 4 times the price). The weight is very low though - which should mean it's good to use on off a ladder etc. The loss of rotation stop isn't really a big deal either - 1.2 J is really too low to try and do any chiseling anyway.I've ordered one as it appears to be a steal at this price. I'll probably also pick up a second small battery too - apparently the Erbauer ones from Screwfix fit, and the 2 Ah is only 20 quid there (http://www.screwfix.com/p/erbauer-eri621bat-18v-2-0ah-li-ion-battery/8352g). I'm hoping it'll fill the gap between my 10.8v drill/drivers (which are amazing but start to struggle above 8mm in brick) and my corded SDS beast (which is very heavy and overpowered for many uses).



the impact joules is less important as its doesn't have a rotary stop function
jimmyt11

depends what you want it for... bare in mind that an SDS chuck is … depends what you want it for... bare in mind that an SDS chuck is engineered to have more play in it than a standard chuck so is not as precise



What he said.

An SDS is for banging holes into bricks and concrete, and not a lot else. I wouldn't bother with trying to use it as a (non-hammer) drill or a driver - a £20 job from Aldi will likely give you a better result.

If you can only justify one tool then a combi makes most sense - you can do pretty much everything you need to around the house with it. If you have a need to drill either larger or a lot of holes into concrete then an SDS is a worthwhile addition, although a cheaper corded model may be better than this as it'll have a load more power and (usually) will allow you to stop the rotary action and chisel too. For lots of screwdriving an impact driver is the next one on the list - but you need to be doing a lot of driving to get the benefits over just using the combi as for most driving tasks the benefit of an impact driver is the lower user fatigue.

In my opinion this is more suited to fill a gap in your tool collection than be the only drill you own (and this is the reason I've bought one). I already have a decent set of drill/driver, combi and impact driver in 10.8v that handle all the non-masonry and smaller (<8mm ish) masonry drilling, and then I have a big corded SDS hammer that will punch holes in pretty much anything with no subtlety whatsoever. This will (hopefully) slot in nicely for holes that the 10.8v combi struggles with but that it's not worth setting up the big SDS for. For most DIY-ers this SDS may be a jack-of-all-trades-but-master-of-none that isn't really the right tool to get though, and the FatMax will probably be the better choice if you're trying to choose between them.
jimmyt11

the impact joules is less important as its doesn't have a rotary stop … the impact joules is less important as its doesn't have a rotary stop function



the impact joule rating is what stands an SDS aside from a combi drill for masonry drilling - it's a key stat to look for in an SDS even if you never turn the rotary off, and it's more important than the speed or torque from the drill for both drilling and chiseling (notice you rarely if ever see a torque value on an SDS spec sheet but every decent tool lists the impact energy?)
I just bought a Stanley FatMax, should I return that to Homebase and get this (assuming there will be no issues returning it)?

FatMax vs Worx
1.3AH vs 2.0AH
2 batteries vs 1 battery
No Hammer vs Hammer
£65 vs £55

Just need for general DIYing. I feel 2nd battery is not essential as these are fast charge units. Which is better deal?
mubashar

I just bought a Stanley FatMax, should I return that to Homebase and get … I just bought a Stanley FatMax, should I return that to Homebase and get this (assuming there will be no issues returning it)?FatMax vs Worx1.3AH vs 2.0AH2 batteries vs 1 batteryNo Hammer vs Hammer£65 vs £55Just need for general DIYing. I feel 2nd battery is not essential as these are fast charge units. Which is better deal?



if your general DIYing is putting furniture together then stick with the FatMax. If you want to put up shelves etc (ie drill small holes into brick walls) then the Stanley will struggle with no hammer action - there's usually a reasonable deal on a combi drill around though. Combi's can do screwdriving and have a hammer setting, so they're the best 'all-round' drills.

If you only want to drill holes in brick or concrete then this would be good. It says it'll act like a screwdriver too, but I doubt it'll be much good for this really.

A combi sounds like the best bet for you really - ie neither the Stanley nor this Worx is really suited.
lilbeastie

if your general DIYing is putting furniture together then stick with the … if your general DIYing is putting furniture together then stick with the FatMax. If you want to put up shelves etc (ie drill small holes into brick walls) then the Stanley will struggle with no hammer action - there's usually a reasonable deal on a combi drill around though. Combi's can do screwdriving and have a hammer setting, so they're the best 'all-round' drills.If you only want to drill holes in brick or concrete then this would be good. It says it'll act like a screwdriver too, but I doubt it'll be much good for this really.A combi sounds like the best bet for you really - ie neither the Stanley nor this Worx is really suited.



So with the Stanley there were other options but I wanted to less rather than more as for very occasional use but would also want it to do holes through bricks.

Stanley drill + 1.3ah + 2nd battery = £65
Stanley drill + hammer + 1.3ah + 2nd battery = £75
Stanley drill + hammer + 2.0ah + 2nd battery = £85

Compared to:

Worx drill + hammer + 2.0ah = £55 (Can obtain 2nd non-branded battery if needed for £20 from screwfix)

If using the standard chuck in the worx, is it not accurate with drilling? Is it not seen as versatile as a regular cordless?
If you want to drill concrete you might be better with one of these:

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/cBOntsvCdbs/hqdefault.jpg

Edited by: "getmeone" 4th May 2016
only 1 battery and its only 2ah pay the extra and get a makita- worx tools are pap X)
ayaz51

it may accept SDS but I highly down it'll survive when used on concrete



​why? utter tosh. that would depend on the drill bits used......
I'd be very tempted but I have a decent cordless and a corded SDS so can't justify one
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