Zero emmission contract hire - cheaper than you might think £8700 3yrs via What Car Magazine
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Zero emmission contract hire - cheaper than you might think £8700 3yrs via What Car Magazine

252
Found 1st Feb 2014
Right, I've just done the maths and ordered a Nissan Leaf from WKB Nissan. We're a two car family, this is for the school run, taking the kids to Cubs, swimming lessons, the supermarket, and general pottering about. The other car will be used for visiting neighbouring counties.

Vote cold by all means if you think this deal doesn't offer good value. Please don't vote cold if you're thinking "that's no good to me" purely because it's impractical for your own personal circumstances.

I posted a similar deal before, and it went icily cold, but this deal is cheaper than that was.

Right, the gist of the deal is this. It's a 6 + 35 contract hire deal, based on monthly payments of £176.83 pcm (plus VAT).

So, £1061 in month 1 (£1273 inc VAT), then £177 (or £212 inc) for the next 35. The total including VAT over the 3yr term is £8700. That's for an allowed mileage of 10,000 per annum, but additional miles are charged at just 3p.

A charge costs £2, and should realistically give 80 miles.

So, 15,000 miles motoring per annum will cost 200 charges @ £2 plus £180 (inc) for additional miles, so £580.

A conventionally fuelled car would have to deliver 160+ miles to the gallon to offer that sort of value. A diesel car delievering 50 mpg would cost £1780p.a., so £100 per month more on fuel.

Based on that 15,000 miles per year, and factoring in all costs except servicing and insurance, I reckon I'm looking a VAT inclusive running cost of 23p per mile from a new car.

252 Comments

Original Poster

http://www.fovargue.com/leafdeal.jpg

Is the monthly battery hire included in the price or is it extra?

How far can you travel before the battery needs recharging?
Are there sufficient charging stations / points to travel a decent distance.
I'm not too sure they are ready yet. Probably ok for a local runaround.

No doubt in the right environment these kinda of cars would work out really well. For the right person this could be a good option.

Don't you have to rent the batteries also at around £70 a month?

Damage

Is the monthly battery hire included in the price or is it extra?



Nissan Leaf comes in 2 forms, rental battery or up front payment. It doesn't appear to be clear but it doesn't mention additional charges on WhatCars website.

The saloon variant from Renault only offers battery rental.
Edited by: "groenleader" 1st Feb 2014

Would a Renault Fluence or whatever it's called be better - plenty used ones around

see if a car club is better , if it works out cheaper than leasing/insuring/maintaining/parking a 2nd car

I applaud your intentions but it annoys me when manufacturers claim zero emmisions, where's that electricity come from? The only other question is what happens in 3 to 5 years when the batteries pack up, as it's contract hire do they pay for replacement or maybe the cost won't exceed the savings as battery technology improves and becomes cheaper.
Rant over, it seems like a good deal for this car.

Have three of these at work. We use to get 90 miles on average out of then now your lucky if you get half that. Only done 5000 miles each

My organisation runs a few of these cars - 80 miles? On the flat with no heater or lights or radio or fan etc etc.

When I drove one I had the lights and heater on and it estimated 48 mile range, I'm sure.

Original Poster

I imagine it's the wintry weather / heaters being on eating into the batteries performance rather that wear.

Given the value of in that P11D column it's safe to say the batteries are included. To be honest I've not asked, but I'll be cancelling if they're not.

Realistically, if we average 60 miles a day that'll be more than enough. I ordered knowing it's unlikely we'll ever be more than 10 miles from home in it, and that's fine for us. I fully understand it's not for everyone.

FWIW I've ordered a free home charging socket from here:
chargemasterplc.com/

That gives a full charge in 8hrs from home. If you plug into a regular socket it takes 12.

Good deal for the all-in motoring costs if you only intend having it for 3 years and hand it back to avoid ageing battery complications, and if electric cars are still very much in obscurity on the roads then there are a fair few electric car only parking spots with free charging. Pretty useless as the primary household car due to limited range, but as a second car for commute it's fine.

Won't save the planet though - making the batteries from start to finish is one of the filthiest, most polluting and most energetic industrial processes going that still relies on fossil fuelled power stations to charge.

arronc

Have three of these at work. We use to get 90 miles on average out of … Have three of these at work. We use to get 90 miles on average out of then now your lucky if you get half that. Only done 5000 miles each



I'm sorry but that's complete nonsense, I've done 20,000 miles in my Leaf over the past year and there has been no discernible change in the battery capacity.

OP - heat from me. Thanks for pointing out the deal - you've started the thought/idea so if anyone is seriously interested they can investigate further & do their own sums - you don't have to answer every question the negative viewers come off with. Deal gets even better for me as I can charge it as a spare car during the day from the solar panels for free, so in effect reducing my cost/mile even further

I have had a Nissan Leaf since 2011 when they came out. We generally use it for school runs and Shopping trips. The early model would show 90 miles range, but with the heaters running, wipers on you would be lucky to get 50 miles. We have since bought the new model in December and it is far better with the heating on, roughly only a 4 mile drop in range. Also, now Nissan give every new Leaf owner access to a petrol car for longer trips of upto 14 days.

liamf12

I applaud your intentions but it annoys me when manufacturers claim zero … I applaud your intentions but it annoys me when manufacturers claim zero emmisions, where's that electricity come from? The only other question is what happens in 3 to 5 years when the batteries pack up, as it's contract hire do they pay for replacement or maybe the cost won't exceed the savings as battery technology improves and becomes cheaper.Rant over, it seems like a good deal for this car.



The batteries are warrantied for 5 years with an expected life of ten years, after which they'll still be valuable and recyclable.

liamf12

I applaud your intentions but it annoys me when manufacturers claim zero … I applaud your intentions but it annoys me when manufacturers claim zero emmisions, where's that electricity come from? The only other question is what happens in 3 to 5 years when the batteries pack up, as it's contract hire do they pay for replacement or maybe the cost won't exceed the savings as battery technology improves and becomes cheaper.Rant over, it seems like a good deal for this car.


after 3 years you're handing it back, so who cares if the batteries are knackered

If you save £1200 a year in fule than you are really paying £5000 for three years

Which is about 1600 a year, not a bad deal if you want to see what a new electric car is like

rlengthorn

I'm sorry but that's complete nonsense, I've done 20,000 miles in my Leaf … I'm sorry but that's complete nonsense, I've done 20,000 miles in my Leaf over the past year and there has been no discernible change in the battery capacity.



I read that driving and charging styles have a significant effect on battery life. Doesn't surprise knowing how temperamental lithium batteries can be.

I think a lot of people can be quite dismissive of these but if they recorded all their car trips they would see that a 60 mile range would be fine, I quite like to go visit places at the weekend and visit relatives, this is where it starts to fall down as you are limited in where you can go, not sure 14 days petrol covers it..

the Vauxhall ampera was on top gear and they thrashed it getting 99 mpg. the average driver will get between 150 to 200 mpg buy second hand for £20000 better deal

Could quite fancy giving this deal a go but contract hire makes me nervous - I've had loads of dings in my current car from the car park at work (mostly idiots parking too close and then opening their car door into the side of my car but also the little dears lobbing half bricks about for fun).

Hot from me for the deal but paying for all that paintwork repair before handing it back... or making insurance claims and seeing my premiums sky rocket and my no claims disappear... probably not.

winchman

I think a lot of people can be quite dismissive of these but if they … I think a lot of people can be quite dismissive of these but if they recorded all their car trips they would see that a 60 mile range would be fine, I quite like to go visit places at the weekend and visit relatives, this is where it starts to fall down as you are limited in where you can go, not sure 14 days petrol covers it..



Even 100 range would mean I would need a second car as well, then the green savings become questionable as how much pollution does it cause to build the second car. I can see that for some these could be great but for me the tech is still needs alot more development.

Original Poster

gizmo67

the Vauxhall ampera was on top gear and they thrashed it getting 99 mpg. … the Vauxhall ampera was on top gear and they thrashed it getting 99 mpg. the average driver will get between 150 to 200 mpg buy second hand for £20000 better deal



I've realised though that having cash tied up in cars is unwise. They're certain to depreciate horribly.

Invest your money cleverly and you might make enough to pay the rent. That's the reasonsing that made me open my eyes to contract hire.

I was thinking about the ice caps too, of course.

The only problem is that most town people can't park on their own property to charge the battery.:(

55derek

The only problem is that most town people can't park on their own … The only problem is that most town people can't park on their own property to charge the battery.:(



And so many new properties only have one parking space so the second car for running around is not an option.

rlengthorn

I'm sorry but that's complete nonsense, I've done 20,000 miles in my Leaf … I'm sorry but that's complete nonsense, I've done 20,000 miles in my Leaf over the past year and there has been no discernible change in the battery capacity.



Seems I'm not the only one from the comments above do I wouldn't call it nonsense. I actually like the car, fast quiet and very comfy seats it's just the battery life doesn't seem great.

Decent second hand car for £2000 incl or less, will work out far cheaper and greener . regardless. Contract hire waste of money.
Edited by: "wendy07" 1st Feb 2014

Fogg1969

I've realised though that having cash tied up in cars is unwise. They're … I've realised though that having cash tied up in cars is unwise. They're certain to depreciate horribly. Invest your money cleverly and you might make enough to pay the rent. That's the reasonsing that made me open my eyes to contract hire.I was thinking about the ice caps too, of course.


It does nothing for the ice caps - the idea that this is zero emissions is absolutely wrong - the emissions are from a power station rather than an exhaust pipe - and until the eco loons stop opposing nuclear power there will always be emissions in power generation, wherever its done (with the exception of inefficient windmills that only work some of the time).

With the price of fuel, need to do some sums!

Ajibee

It does nothing for the ice caps - the idea that this is zero emissions … It does nothing for the ice caps - the idea that this is zero emissions is absolutely wrong - the emissions are from a power station rather than an exhaust pipe - and until the eco loons stop opposing nuclear power there will always be emissions in power generation, wherever its done (with the exception of inefficient windmills that only work some of the time).



There are many cities that will benefit from less pollution, including noise pollution. Some cities in Europe will and have banned cars altogether due to their pollution.

Ajibee

It does nothing for the ice caps - the idea that this is zero emissions … It does nothing for the ice caps - the idea that this is zero emissions is absolutely wrong - the emissions are from a power station rather than an exhaust pipe - and until the eco loons stop opposing nuclear power there will always be emissions in power generation, wherever its done (with the exception of inefficient windmills that only work some of the time).


Chernobyl.

arronc

Have three of these at work. We use to get 90 miles on average out of … Have three of these at work. We use to get 90 miles on average out of then now your lucky if you get half that. Only done 5000 miles each



lol. I've done > 5000 miles in 3 months and still get 100% battery capacity. I'd suggest you see the Nissan garage as they will replace the battery FOC if you get less than 70% charge before 50,000 miles or 5 years.

Look at the forums on leaftalk.co.uk. There are people who have done ~100K miles with minimal capacity loss.

arronc

Seems I'm not the only one from the comments above do I wouldn't call it … Seems I'm not the only one from the comments above do I wouldn't call it nonsense. I actually like the car, fast quiet and very comfy seats it's just the battery life doesn't seem great.



We love our Leaf. We do have a ICE second car but we usually use the leaf, especially if there's a rapid charger on route. I'm more than happy to take a 20-30 min break to charge the battery.

We've only had the car 3 months but we have saved over £1000 in fuel. We also have an Adsa around the corner and mostly charge for free

pepperlic

Chernobyl.



If you charge at a Ecotricity Rapid charger all their electricity is 100% renewable, i.e Solar and Wind.

stuellis

Even 100 range would mean I would need a second car as well, then the … Even 100 range would mean I would need a second car as well, then the green savings become questionable as how much pollution does it cause to build the second car. I can see that for some these could be great but for me the tech is still needs alot more development.



The second car will last at least twice a long though, meaning less second cars need to be produced. The majority of negatives that the naysayers come up with are usually overcome. It can be quite complex to defend or promote these cars. Lets face though the UK is a car snob country and very few people weigh up the economies or the environmental impact, why stop at cars?
There's no reason why you can't just treat yourself to an electric car, just because you like it. To hell with the depreciation, don't sell it, run it into the ground.
Edited by: "parabolica" 1st Feb 2014

Zero emissions my ****....the car might not kick CO2 from the tail-pipe, but the bloomin grate power-station that charged to would be as they are far from being carbon neutral.
I'm starting to get racked off with these false claims.....petrol, diesel or electric, they all require the same power to move mass A to B, just depends on where the waste from that power generation is 'expelled'.

Won't vote cold though as its a good deal for a car, regardless.

wendy07

Decent second hand car for £2000 incl or less, will work out far cheaper … Decent second hand car for £2000 incl or less, will work out far cheaper and greener . regardless.



Of course it will. I didn't think anyone other than companies, bought new cars any more! 40-50% depreciation in the first year! And the only reason companies buy them is because they get a 40% discount anyway!

So, the true comparison is against a 9-month old 40% discounted non-electric car, which has a residual value after the three years. Try factoring that into the equation and see what the result is!

All the quibbling about whether the electric car really has zero emissions ..

When a petrol/diesel car has a quoted carbon emissions rating this is the emissions from the vehicle and not inc. the production of the petrol or diesel so in the exact same way, the electric car does have zero emissions because likewise they dont calculate the carbon emissions to produce the electric car's method of propulsion - electric ... Therefore its a fair comparison. Of course technically the electric car does have a carbon footprint .. But then again a bicycle does, a pencil does, someone running to work does ...
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