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Zhumell Z114 114mm Reflector Dobsonian Telescope - £94.89 Delivered @ Costco
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Zhumell Z114 114mm Reflector Dobsonian Telescope - £94.89 Delivered @ Costco

£94.89£139.8932% Free P&P FreeCostco Deals
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Deal editor
Posted 10th Apr

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Looks awesome for having a peep at the moon As it says it's "portable" it's worth looking at the other images, to give you a rough idea of the size. I've not seen the 114mm model cheaper than this and reviews on Amazon are pretty decent too. Might be ideal for some of you.

Note: "Your estimated delivery time will be 7 business days from the time of order. Postcode Restrictions may apply. Find out more in the Delivery & Returns Tab below."

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Stunning Views With a Parabolic Mirror
The Zhumell Z114 Portable Reflector Telescope features a 114mm parabolic primary mirror, a high-end feature not usually found in telescopes of this size. The parabolic mirror removes visual defects like spherical aberration, providing noticeably sharper views. The primary mirror and all other optical surfaces are coated with Zhumell’s high-reflectivity coatings. You can count on more than 90 percent light transmission, for brighter views of even dim objects like nebulae.

You’ll also get two fully coated eyepieces: a 1.25” 17mm eyepiece for wide field views giving 26x and a 1.25” 10mm eyepiece for higher magnification giving 45x.

The Dobsonian That Goes Everywhere
The Z114’s mechanical design is simple and streamlined. A durable, sturdy construction means your Zhumell will stand up to years of use and travel. Thanks to its compact size and weight, you can confidently pack it along for camping trips, vacations, and more.

When you arrive at your observing site, the telescope comes together in seconds. Once you’re set up, swing the scope on its lazy susan-style mount toward your desired object. Center your target in the Red Dot Finderscope, you’re ready to view it through the eyepiece. Then, make small adjustments to smoothly track objects as they drift across the sky.

Whether you’re an experienced amateur astronomer or a brand new stargazer, the Zhumell Z114 is the perfect portable telescope.


Key Specifications
  • 114mm Reflector type telescope
  • Dobsonian type mount
  • Focal Length: 450mm
  • Focal Ratio: f/3.95
  • Parabolic Primary Mirror
  • 17mm Eyepiece 1.25” (26x)
  • 10mm Eyepiece 1.25” (45x)
  • Red Dot Finder included

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Top comments
ackbar12/04/2020 15:24

What would we realistically be able to see with this?


I've got the Skywatcher version with the same size aperture. With the addition of a higher powered eyepiece (£30 ish) and a cheap barlow lens (another £30) you should be able to get this up to around 160x magnification giving views similar to the attached pic taken via a smartphone adapter. The rings of saturn are clearly visible - but the planet is tiny in the eyepiece. Similarly, several ofJupiter's moons can be seen and on a *good day* you can make out the bands across the surface and *very* occasionally clearly enough to identify the great red spot. It will happily give good views of the moon as shown below.

This is the minimum level of scope I think most people would find satisfactory, but a significant increase in view requires and equally significant increase in budget. To see something noticeably better you're looking at £300+.

40392132-Uoyyq.jpg40392132-Qae4M.jpg
I keep looking at the Skywatcher 130p Flextube for instant gratification and travel use. More expensive than this mind but gets rave reviews.

The smaller (but comparable by the look of it - f/4 vs f/3.95) Heritage 100p is often around the £100 mark, so I'm not sure I'd be rushing out to get one without some comparison research.
Edited by: "tenohfive" 10th Apr
ackbar12/04/2020 15:24

What would we realistically be able to see with this?


The trouble with astronomy is you're always left wanting more and it gets very very expensive. This is why I gave the hobby up. Personally If you want to get into this you're best off spending a bit more and getting a scope that satisfies. For that reason a Skyquest XT8 I think is the perfect scope. It's around £250 on a good day second hand, and you'll be able to see things from Jupiter's moons, the band's around Saturn, deep space nebula and more. They are huge though about the size of an ironing board, but they'll blow your mind.
Edited by: "pelaquin" 12th Apr
39 Comments
Good price, I love these little dob's. I need to pick up something smaller, my 10" dob kills my back.
£140 on Amazon. Here's one of the many 5 star reviews:

Zhumell ZHUS002-1 Z114 Portable Altazimuth Reflector Telescope

The telescope.
This is a basic reflector telescope with a 4-inch mirror. It is mounted on a simple Altazimuth mount and comes with two eye pieces, object finder, screw driver and a mirror cover.

Build quality.
It is well made and finished and should last years.

Set up.
Being a portable telescope with a simple mount there is no setting up needed. You move the telescope manually to track objects in the night sky. It is not designed for photography or serious observation but it is the sort of telescope to give to a child to fire up and interest in astronomy.
I positioned it on a gate post and it was fine as the post was solid.

What can you see?
The moon looks great through it and you can see many craters on it. Mars, Saturn and Jupiter are in the sky at the moment and you can see how red Mars looks. The rings of Saturn are just visible and you can see banding on Jupiter. Deep sky objects like galaxies may be a bit more difficult but not impossible to see.

Overall.
A great portable beginners’ astronomy telescope. Everything you need is here to start enjoying the night sky.
Are these a good choice for a beginner, or could I do better?
These mini Dobsonian scopes are a fantastic choice for a beginner, quick and easy to set up and good as a 'grab and go' scope. Much simpler to use than a tripod with a fine adjustment mount, just make sure that you have a stable platform like a garden table to use it on.

I have been very pleased with the 100 mm version, that I got from Amazon for a very good price, however this one has the advantage of a bigger aperture and the ability to collimate the main mirror (although I didn't have any problems with my 100 mm scope). The red dot is ideal for initial pointing and use it with an astronomy app. on your smartphone to locate other targets than the moon and planets.
I keep looking at the Skywatcher 130p Flextube for instant gratification and travel use. More expensive than this mind but gets rave reviews.

The smaller (but comparable by the look of it - f/4 vs f/3.95) Heritage 100p is often around the £100 mark, so I'm not sure I'd be rushing out to get one without some comparison research.
Edited by: "tenohfive" 10th Apr
I usually recommend the Heritage 100P as the minimum for beginners, which is around £100. This is an equivalent but next-model-up, so at this price it is a great buy. Only drawback is that It has a bit less useful eyepieces - they went for a 10mm and a 17mm (both Kellners), which is a bit too close to each other. The 10mm + 25mm combo that skywatcher does, makes more sense.
What would we realistically be able to see with this?
ackbar12/04/2020 15:24

What would we realistically be able to see with this?


Planets in some/good detail.
ackbar12/04/2020 15:24

What would we realistically be able to see with this?


The trouble with astronomy is you're always left wanting more and it gets very very expensive. This is why I gave the hobby up. Personally If you want to get into this you're best off spending a bit more and getting a scope that satisfies. For that reason a Skyquest XT8 I think is the perfect scope. It's around £250 on a good day second hand, and you'll be able to see things from Jupiter's moons, the band's around Saturn, deep space nebula and more. They are huge though about the size of an ironing board, but they'll blow your mind.
Edited by: "pelaquin" 12th Apr
ackbar12/04/2020 15:24

What would we realistically be able to see with this?


I've got the Skywatcher version with the same size aperture. With the addition of a higher powered eyepiece (£30 ish) and a cheap barlow lens (another £30) you should be able to get this up to around 160x magnification giving views similar to the attached pic taken via a smartphone adapter. The rings of saturn are clearly visible - but the planet is tiny in the eyepiece. Similarly, several ofJupiter's moons can be seen and on a *good day* you can make out the bands across the surface and *very* occasionally clearly enough to identify the great red spot. It will happily give good views of the moon as shown below.

This is the minimum level of scope I think most people would find satisfactory, but a significant increase in view requires and equally significant increase in budget. To see something noticeably better you're looking at £300+.

40392132-Uoyyq.jpg40392132-Qae4M.jpg
Very generally speaking these little Dobsonian telescopes are the first step on the 'proper' telescope ladder.

They're also ideal for those with kids, easy to use, and not too big. Perfect beginners scope.

I have no experience of the Zhumell but the established and most recommended brand in the astronomical community for these is Sky-Watcher.

For those on a tighter budget, Sky-Watcher makes a smaller one called the Heritage 76 for about £60 delivered.

firstlightoptics.com/beg…tml
amazon.co.uk/Sky…TF8

Roughly equivalent to the Zhumell is the Sky-Watcher Heritage 100 costing £106 delivered from FLO (highly respected specialised store). Aside from being the safe-bet brand name, it has a wider-view eyepiece, and the magnification can be doubled used the included barlow lens.
firstlightoptics.com/beg…tml

(I've avoided all the needlessly tedious details to preserve the sanity of beginners)
Edited by: "Jules.Tohpipi" 12th Apr
I've been looking at a telescope for a few weeks now. I was set on what most consider to be the ultimate beginners scope, the 200p! Can anyone tell me if this would be a better alternative? Any help much appreciated
Wombl312/04/2020 19:24

I was set on what most consider to be the ultimate beginners scope, the …I was set on what most consider to be the ultimate beginners scope, the 200p! Can anyone tell me if this would be a better alternative? Any help much appreciated


200p is a big step up from this - in both capability and price. If we're talking about the Dobsonian version the only caveat is the bulk of it for moving/storage. If we're talking about the Newtonian version on a tripod mount the caveat us that equatorial mounts can be intimidating for beginners. The best scope is the one you use - and for some this smaller dob would get more use as it's less effort to literally pick up and go but in general terms there's no comparison. If you can afford, move and store a 200p Dobsonian it would be a brilliant scope for years to come.
Is it possible to buy on Costco site without a membership?
Wombl312/04/2020 19:24

I've been looking at a telescope for a few weeks now. I was set on what …I've been looking at a telescope for a few weeks now. I was set on what most consider to be the ultimate beginners scope, the 200p! Can anyone tell me if this would be a better alternative? Any help much appreciated


Yes, absolutely the Sky-Watcher 200p is the better alternative if you have the budget and the room. Actually, when stored its footprint is quite small - but it's tall obviously.

I loved the 200p when I had it. Minimal set-up you just plonk it outside. I could see the bands of Jupiter and the red spot. I enjoyed watching shadow transits of Jupiter's moons. Basically the shadows of Jupiter's moons crossing its surface. There's free apps for predicting when the red spot is visible and when the transits occur. This cannot be achieved on the entry-level telescopes.

It's an excellent no fuss, quick set-up, big light bucket for great views of planets and some of the deep sky objects.

Expect to update the eyepieces at some point to get the best out of it.

I upgraded to the 250px GOTO because with our local light pollution I was struggling to find some of the faint galaxies. However, the light pollution means I can hardly see them anyway. Doh! Wished I'd kept the 200p.
Edited by: "Jules.Tohpipi" 12th Apr
Mike_HUKD12/04/2020 20:39

Sorry for the mass quote! Would this scope be compatible with a T mount (I …Sorry for the mass quote! Would this scope be compatible with a T mount (I think!) to use with a mirrorless camera? Thanks!


Pretty sure it would be able to physically attach a t-ring and brand specific camera adapter, but whether it would then be able to reach focus is a very different question. I think many reflector telescopes don't have enough "travel" or movement in the focus tube to allow the camera to reach a focus point on the image. Not sure how easy that is to calculate or find out in advance unless you come across someone on a forum who has this exact scope.
girders12/04/2020 20:56

Pretty sure it would be able to physically attach a t-ring and brand …Pretty sure it would be able to physically attach a t-ring and brand specific camera adapter, but whether it would then be able to reach focus is a very different question. I think many reflector telescopes don't have enough "travel" or movement in the focus tube to allow the camera to reach a focus point on the image. Not sure how easy that is to calculate or find out in advance unless you come across someone on a forum who has this exact scope.


OK thanks for your guidance. Out of interest, would the same apply to the 200p Dobsonian you suggested? On a bit of a research kick now
Mike_HUKD12/04/2020 20:59

OK thanks for your guidance. Out of interest, would the same apply to the …OK thanks for your guidance. Out of interest, would the same apply to the 200p Dobsonian you suggested? On a bit of a research kick now


If you are in anyway semi-serious about a growing interest in astro-photography then a Dobsonian is not your tool. Fine for short-exposure shots of the planets. Astro-photography may appear simple at first glance but it quickly becomes a major PITA and is a money pit - unless your expectations are very low. People do some limited photography on the 200p on a Dobsonian mount. For anything more ambitious - nebulae, galaxies - you'll need a motorised equatorial mount and indeed probably a smaller telescope.

Pop into Stargazers Lounge for abundant friendly advice on this.
Edited by: "Jules.Tohpipi" 12th Apr
Mike_HUKD12/04/2020 20:39

Sorry for the mass quote! Would this scope be compatible with a T mount (I …Sorry for the mass quote! Would this scope be compatible with a T mount (I think!) to use with a mirrorless camera? Thanks!


As above, while it can attach, you won't be able to take photos of galaxies or nebula etc, you need a tracking mount for that, ideally EQ but motorised.dobsonian mounts work too - read up about lucky imaging - stack thousands of 3-4s exposures.

What you can do is quick videos of planets as they drift across the sensor, which you then split and stack. A £5 webcam will give very similar results. But really a dobsonian is a visual telescope and they're so damn good. I'm considering one too after this week of perfectly clear nights
Edited by: "MrKrabs" 12th Apr
Jules.Tohpipi12/04/2020 21:11

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MrKrabs12/04/2020 21:41

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Thanks both. Very helpful. I'm tempted to get one especially if they can be had around that £250 mark mentioned previously. I will wait for a decent price to be available - had a look on eBay and the only ones I see are collection only outside my area. In the mean time it sounds like I need to do some research!
I'd be all over this if it wasnt for the £15 fee to join and not knowing shipping cost.
Wubalubadubdub13/04/2020 01:44

I'd be all over this if it wasnt for the £15 fee to join and not knowing …I'd be all over this if it wasnt for the £15 fee to join and not knowing shipping cost.


40395492-6DRGb.jpgWell at least delivery is included in the price
fatbiker13/04/2020 02:24

[Image] Well at least delivery is included in the price


Nah, I'm one of those postcodes that bring surcharges by the looks of it.
Mike_HUKD13/04/2020 00:42

Thanks both. Very helpful. I'm tempted to get one especially if they can …Thanks both. Very helpful. I'm tempted to get one especially if they can be had around that £250 mark mentioned previously. I will wait for a decent price to be available - had a look on eBay and the only ones I see are collection only outside my area. In the mean time it sounds like I need to do some research!




I was just reading a posting from FLO on SGL that Sky-Watcher's UK warehouse is on shutdown due to the virus. Supply will be backed up until that is resolved.
Wubalubadubdub13/04/2020 02:26

Nah, I'm one of those postcodes that bring surcharges by the looks of it.


Sorry about that . It does make it less of a deal adding in postage/membership etc . Then factor in the "extras" that are recommended here too and it's suddenly not such a great deal as it first appeared
tenohfive10/04/2020 15:19

I keep looking at the Skywatcher 130p Flextube for instant gratification …I keep looking at the Skywatcher 130p Flextube for instant gratification and travel use. More expensive than this mind but gets rave reviews. The smaller (but comparable by the look of it - f/4 vs f/3.95) Heritage 100p is often around the £100 mark, so I'm not sure I'd be rushing out to get one without some comparison research.


+1 for the SkyWatcher Heritage 130p flextube. Just look for reviews and forum posts raving about this and the US version Astronomers Without Borders (AWB) OneSky. Both incidentally made by same company who own Celestron.

firstlightoptics.com/beg…tml

For £142 delivered it's worth the extra investment for a much better aperture size and quality mirror.
40395718.jpg
Edited by: "c4llum83" 13th Apr
Mike_HUKD13/04/2020 00:42

Thanks both. Very helpful. I'm tempted to get one especially if they can …Thanks both. Very helpful. I'm tempted to get one especially if they can be had around that £250 mark mentioned previously. I will wait for a decent price to be available - had a look on eBay and the only ones I see are collection only outside my area. In the mean time it sounds like I need to do some research!


Also try astrobuysell.com/uk/…php
Great deal @Ken
Heat
Can I get this without paying for Costco membership please?
DarrenMinter13/04/2020 12:38

Can I get this without paying for Costco membership please?


Looks like no. I'm in the same boat but looks like it's not possible. Can't even view how much postage is without a membership (my postcode usually incurs a surcharge).

Shame but I guess that's why its worth having a membership in the first place!
Can someone with telescope expertise explain the difference between this (the Z114) and the Heritage 100p?

And also if it's worth the £50 extra to go for a Heritage 130p over a Heritage 100p?
Wubalubadubdub13/04/2020 14:24

Can someone with telescope expertise explain the difference between this …Can someone with telescope expertise explain the difference between this (the Z114) and the Heritage 100p?And also if it's worth the £50 extra to go for a Heritage 130p over a Heritage 100p?


Main difference is this 114mm aperture, the 100p is 100mm. So this has better light gathering ability. Both have similar focal length. Assuming both have similar quality glass, this is better value.
Wubalubadubdub13/04/2020 14:24

Can someone with telescope expertise explain the difference between this …Can someone with telescope expertise explain the difference between this (the Z114) and the Heritage 100p?And also if it's worth the £50 extra to go for a Heritage 130p over a Heritage 100p?


Whether it's worth the extra £50 is a little subjective, but I'd without question spend the extra. There are a number of people with much bigger, much more expensive scopes with complicated (and expensive) tracking mounts and the like that also own a 130p. It apparently punches well above its weight.
Will I be able to see the rings around Uranus?
girders12/04/2020 17:22

I've got the Skywatcher version with the same size aperture. With the …I've got the Skywatcher version with the same size aperture. With the addition of a higher powered eyepiece (£30 ish) and a cheap barlow lens (another £30) you should be able to get this up to around 160x magnification giving views similar to the attached pic taken via a smartphone adapter. The rings of saturn are clearly visible - but the planet is tiny in the eyepiece. Similarly, several ofJupiter's moons can be seen and on a *good day* you can make out the bands across the surface and *very* occasionally clearly enough to identify the great red spot. It will happily give good views of the moon as shown below. This is the minimum level of scope I think most people would find satisfactory, but a significant increase in view requires and equally significant increase in budget. To see something noticeably better you're looking at £300+.[Image] [Image]


What would a example of a higher powered eyepiece and cheap barlow lens? Thanks
spongefactory14/04/2020 09:15

What would a example of a higher powered eyepiece and cheap barlow lens? …What would a example of a higher powered eyepiece and cheap barlow lens? Thanks


Calculation for magnification is focal length divided by eyepiece size - so here the focal length is 450mm. Your looking to get up to about 150x magnification - so the calculation makes that a 3mm eyepiece. But for various reasons that is pretty much unusable for basic/cheap eyepieces as the eye relief (how far your pupil is from the lens) would be so short it would be uncomfortable. I've got a 4mm eyepiece that is barely useable. Better option is a 6mm eyepiece and a 2 x Barlow (which effectively doubles the magnification. Don't get sucked into a higher powered Barlow as they only really work for astrophotography and used without an eyepiece - not sure of the technical reasons.

Remember that these calculations are for *this scope* only.
Barlow : firstlightoptics.com/bar…tml
6mm eyepiece: https://w…tml
Mine arrived today. It's actually a rebadged Astroscan Millennium scope which was presumably originally made by Zhumell for Scientifics Direct. They have put a sticker over the brand name on the scope but don't seem to have bothered on the Dob mount for some reason. They have also tried to remove a sticky label on the side of the mount which has left a sticky residue behind. It comes in a Zhumell box though and is labeled as a "special edition"... Just be aware if you are planning on buying.
I thought about one for social distancing from my mother in law
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