ZYXEL 2 Bay powerplus NAS Delivered for £65.96 @ Dabs
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ZYXEL 2 Bay powerplus NAS Delivered for £65.96 @ Dabs

38
Found 13th Dec 2015
2 Bay NAS with 1.6GHZ processor, recommended at this price. No disks included.

38 Comments

Original Poster

On the HUKD App for tablets, so can't update image. Link to Image

Shame this isn't the original version with the serial pins these make great little Linux servers.

very nice starter nas and for a 2-bay as well, it's a great price.

i had the NSA310S before I upgraded to Synology and it really did a nice job. The support wasn't up to much but it certainly did what i wanted it to do and streamed my stuff perfectly fine.

for a two bay - that is a good deal - heat added

Is this much of an upgrade from the NSA320 does anyone know? I have a 310 realised I needed a dual bay because the films racked up quickly (not for RAID though) and bought the 320 - maybe I should have spent a bit more in the first place. Don't have the money for a Synology though!

this is a great bit of kit for things like the download service with RSS, but the fan is noisy as anything.

Had to hide in in a cupboard in the spare room - and it's still loud enough to hear from downstairs!

Don't forget Quidco - rates do vary though.

The fan can be replaced, though I read that is is a slim 20mm thick one. I did see someone had fitted a fan to the rear of the case rather than internally.

sabresonic

Is this much of an upgrade from the NSA320 does anyone know? I have a … Is this much of an upgrade from the NSA320 does anyone know? I have a 310 realised I needed a dual bay because the films racked up quickly (not for RAID though) and bought the 320 - maybe I should have spent a bit more in the first place. Don't have the money for a Synology though!



Main differences are 1.6Ghz processor, the 320 is 1.2Ghz and the 325 has a single USB3 on front (USB2 rear) with the 320 having USB2 front and rear.

vultura

Main differences are 1.6Ghz processor, the 320 is 1.2Ghz and the 325 has … Main differences are 1.6Ghz processor, the 320 is 1.2Ghz and the 325 has a single USB3 on front (USB2 rear) with the 320 having USB2 front and rear.



Great thanks. Good price, paid around this for my NSA320!

adam_holcombe

...but the fan is noisy as anything.



Do you have the V2 version? I have an original NSA325 and agree the fan is noisy, but AFAIK for the V2 they upped the fan size from 60mm to 80mm and reduced the speed. If it's still too noisy then Zyxel have really dropped the ball!
Edited by: "RufusA" 14th Dec 2015

I Have bought 9 month ago not bad device - Similar price maybe cheaper : ) Amazon deal : )
The good points price : ) noise depends what HDD inside , Fan noise not really bother as it is spins low I think more noise come from HDD that the fan
Speed Im getting 70 - 80 MB Read and write 40 MB on giga lan
The are on the market dual cores NAS have not tested them but when read the write speeds are similar so whats the point dual core ?
Memory I think on this one 512 MB when looking memory load it is minimal for me max 200 MB so lot of spare memory floating for other task

If you need more speed say 100-120 MB on giga lan then needs proper server like Windows Home Server - then cost as well licence windows , hardware, maintenance etc.
I have one, but keeping just for HDD encryption otherwise will be running everything from NAS



Can this be setup as a plex media server?

iceberg

Can this be setup as a plex media server?


Yes, once you install FFP then you can install Plex. This device also has its own built in media serving software so you can set it to share music, videos, pictures etc over your network, then you just need to get a dlna/upnp app on your phone or other devices and it will find them automatically. It also has an itunes server.

I use Transmission to download torrents straight to the NSA, and it can do this while streaming a 1080p movie to my computer and music to another device.

Edited by: "backupguy" 14th Dec 2015

Great price for a dual bay NAS.
I'm happy with my single bay Zyxel NAS - which is solidly made and has reliable software.
There are conflicting comments on the web for NSA325 fan noise. I changed the fan on my single bay Zyxel NAS and it wasn't difficult. I'd be tempted to buy an NSA325 and change the fan only if needed.

RufusA

Do you have the V2 version? I have an original NSA325 and agree the fan … Do you have the V2 version? I have an original NSA325 and agree the fan is noisy, but AFAIK for the V2 they upped the fan size from 60mm to 80mm and reduced the speed. If it's still too noisy then Zyxel have really dropped the ball!



My v2 isn't "noisy" as such, but you can hear it pulsing/thrumming.at times. Fan speed doesn't seem to go below 1,000 or above 1200.

Incognitoso

If you need more speed say 100-120 MB on giga lan then needs proper … If you need more speed say 100-120 MB on giga lan then needs proper server like Windows Home Server - then cost as well licence windows , hardware, maintenance etc. I have one, but keeping just for HDD encryption otherwise will be running everything from NAS



Windows Server? For a NAS? lol. There's lots of much better options without resorting to Windows Home Server or spending extra on software. e.g. NAS4Free. x86/x64 32/64-bit, and there's even an ARM version for the Pi .

nas4free.org/

Stick it on any old (or new, low power) PC and you are good to go. You can build your own NAS out of anything from Xeon server down to Raspberry Pi. Been toying with the idea of building myself a low-power AMD APU based NAS, mainly due to having no size storage restrictions and more SATA 3 ports available vs off-the-shelf NAS, but also an APU will have far better performance than your average off-the-shelf NAS devices.

But, IF I went off the shelf then this looks fine for home use.

Edited by: "conscience" 14th Dec 2015

Great that you can run plex on this. Is it powerful enough to transcode video?
Anyone know what the running cost of this works out to be, per day, in terms of electricity?
I presume this is a device which you don't shut down? You switch it on, and it runs non-stop, for a couple of years?

In my albeit brief experience with Zyxel NAS boxes, they're about as reliable as a we paper bag.

iceberg

Great that you can run plex on this. Is it powerful enough to transcode … Great that you can run plex on this. Is it powerful enough to transcode video? Anyone know what the running cost of this works out to be, per day, in terms of electricity? I presume this is a device which you don't shut down? You switch it on, and it runs non-stop, for a couple of years?



as far as i understand, they're not powerful enough and are unable to transcode video.

iceberg

Anyone know what the running cost of this works out to be, per day, in … Anyone know what the running cost of this works out to be, per day, in terms of electricity? I presume this is a device which you don't shut down? You switch it on, and it runs non-stop, for a couple of years?



According to Zyxel it uses 27 watts of electric when drives drives are being accessed. Have seen 7 watts quoted as figure for idle consumption.

adam_holcombe

this is a great bit of kit for things like the download service with RSS, … this is a great bit of kit for things like the download service with RSS, but the fan is noisy as anything. Had to hide in in a cupboard in the spare room - and it's still loud enough to hear from downstairs!



I'd wager that restrictive exhaust vent is to blame, I'd be taking a dremel to that and warranty be damned.

This is cheaper at ebuyer.

conscience

Windows Server? For a NAS? lol. There's lots of much better options … Windows Server? For a NAS? lol. There's lots of much better options without resorting to Windows Home Server or spending extra on software. e.g. NAS4Free. x86/x64 32/64-bit, and there's even an ARM version for the Pi .http://www.nas4free.org/Stick it on any old (or new, low power) PC and you are good to go. You can build your own NAS out of anything from Xeon server down to Raspberry Pi. Been toying with the idea of building myself a low-power AMD APU based NAS, mainly due to having no size storage restrictions and more SATA 3 ports available vs off-the-shelf NAS, but also an APU will have far better performance than your average off-the-shelf NAS devices. But, IF I went off the shelf then this looks fine for home use.



The pi is a bit clunky when it comes to building a NAS for reasons that are explained well on a quick google search but yes you don't need Windows.
Edited by: "definition" 14th Dec 2015

definition

The pi is a bit clunky when it comes to building a NAS for reasons that … The pi is a bit clunky when it comes to building a NAS for reasons that are explained well on a quick google search but yes you don't need Windows.



Hey don't knock unless you've tried it - it works better than you might think! The Pi can be had from just £4 so what do you expect performance wise? Depends on your level of requirements, but I find the Pi is fine for solo file server/video player, even streaming etc. The downsides are few, mainly a lack of bandwidth and it lacks a SATA port obviously, but the same software will work on any old PC + hard drive, you don't have to go with a bargain basement Pi to avoid paying for any Windows licences. For many people who aren't in a rush e.g. most home users, waiting a few seconds for a Pi beats paying out lots of cash on faster alternatives any day.

For those who do want/need more speed, building your own makes most sense considering the price of your average NAS device which are too expensive imo. Like I said, I'm just debating which AMD APU to build my own NAS around and picking myself a motherboard with as many SATA3 6Gb/sec ports as possible so it'll hold a lot of storage without any artificial restriction you get with a commercial NAS. For a custom NAS build I'll be looking at spending under £200 (without drives), and for that price think gold rated Seasonic PSU, 8GB DDR3 RAM, 4 core/4 thread AMD APU with built in graphics + video encode/decode and hardware audio support etc. Once it's built, combine it with some trusty HGST drives and that's NAS heaven imo. A home build would thrash any these more expensive NAS devices I've seen with their weedy ARM/dual core Atom processors and cost less - what's not to like?

Original Poster

conscience

Hey don't knock unless you've tried it - it works better than you might … Hey don't knock unless you've tried it - it works better than you might think! The Pi can be had from just £4 so what do you expect performance wise? Depends on your level of requirements, but I find the Pi is fine for solo file server/video player, even streaming etc. The downsides are few, mainly a lack of bandwidth and it lacks a SATA port obviously, but the same software will work on any old PC + hard drive, you don't have to go with a bargain basement Pi to avoid paying for any Windows licences. For many people who aren't in a rush e.g. most home users, waiting a few seconds for a Pi beats paying out lots of cash on faster alternatives any day.For those who do want/need more speed, building your own makes most sense considering the price of your average NAS device which are too expensive imo. Like I said, I'm just debating which AMD APU to build my own NAS around and picking myself a motherboard with as many SATA3 6Gb/sec ports as possible so it'll hold a lot of storage without any artificial restriction you get with a commercial NAS. For a custom NAS build I'll be looking at spending under £200 (without drives), and for that price think gold rated Seasonic PSU, 8GB DDR3 RAM, 4 core/4 thread AMD APU with built in graphics + video encode/decode and hardware audio support etc. Once it's built, combine it with some trusty HGST drives and that's NAS heaven imo. A home build would thrash any these more expensive NAS devices I've seen with their weedy ARM/dual core Atom processors and cost less - what's not to like?



Hmmm... good... but too expensive... too much hassle and return is negligible (for a home/media server) - I'd stick with this...

conscience

Hey don't knock unless you've tried it - it works better than you might … Hey don't knock unless you've tried it - it works better than you might think! The Pi can be had from just £4 so what do you expect performance wise? Depends on your level of requirements, but I find the Pi is fine for solo file server/video player, even streaming etc. The downsides are few, mainly a lack of bandwidth and it lacks a SATA port obviously, but the same software will work on any old PC + hard drive, you don't have to go with a bargain basement Pi to avoid paying for any Windows licences. For many people who aren't in a rush e.g. most home users, waiting a few seconds for a Pi beats paying out lots of cash on faster alternatives any day.For those who do want/need more speed, building your own makes most sense considering the price of your average NAS device which are too expensive imo. Like I said, I'm just debating which AMD APU to build my own NAS around and picking myself a motherboard with as many SATA3 6Gb/sec ports as possible so it'll hold a lot of storage without any artificial restriction you get with a commercial NAS. For a custom NAS build I'll be looking at spending under £200 (without drives), and for that price think gold rated Seasonic PSU, 8GB DDR3 RAM, 4 core/4 thread AMD APU with built in graphics + video encode/decode and hardware audio support etc. Once it's built, combine it with some trusty HGST drives and that's NAS heaven imo. A home build would thrash any these more expensive NAS devices I've seen with their weedy ARM/dual core Atom processors and cost less - what's not to like?



But that lack of bandwidth is a major issue with a nas if you want to stream anything larger than an mp3 over the network. The situation is even worse with a zero as it doesn't even have an Ethernet port at all. You should know tbis means it will be complete and utter ****.

The work around for the other models is quite ugly and cumbersome, difficult for most people to get their head around and adds extra cost and complexity to the device. Unfortunately you can't get away from these issues, it's better to go for something like an odroid instead bit then the cost starts to add up as it does with the Pi anyway. I'd much rather buy a device that's designed to work as a nas than buy one that's basically crippled from the outset.
Edited by: "definition" 15th Dec 2015

conscience

Windows Server? For a NAS? lol. There's lots of much better options … Windows Server? For a NAS? lol. There's lots of much better options without resorting to Windows Home Server or spending extra on software. e.g. NAS4Free. x86/x64 32/64-bit, and there's even an ARM version for the Pi .http://www.nas4free.org/Stick it on any old (or new, low power) PC and you are good to go. You can build your own NAS out of anything from Xeon server down to Raspberry Pi. Been toying with the idea of building myself a low-power AMD APU based NAS, mainly due to having no size storage restrictions and more SATA 3 ports available vs off-the-shelf NAS, but also an APU will have far better performance than your average off-the-shelf NAS devices. But, IF I went off the shelf then this looks fine for home use.


I replaced zyxel NSA 325 with amd zacate if recall correctly. It was anything but quick or energy efficient. Sorry amd. I'll stick to Intel for another decade.

Bizness

In my albeit brief experience with Zyxel NAS boxes, they're about as … In my albeit brief experience with Zyxel NAS boxes, they're about as reliable as a we paper bag.



In my 17 months' experience of a Zyxel NSA325 V2, it hasn't missed a beat. The fan is barely audible, the disks spin down when idle and the device is unobtrusive except when you're thrashing the disks, when you can hear the heads moving around. Can't comment on the reliability of paper bags.

Is Polkast still free with ZyXEL NAS' does anybody know? Any recommendations for alternatives to try?

sabresonic

Is Polkast still free with ZyXEL NAS' does anybody know? Any … Is Polkast still free with ZyXEL NAS' does anybody know? Any recommendations for alternatives to try?



It doesn't look like it is free on the 325 v2, see page 46 of the following PDF - ftp://ftp.zyxel.com/NSA…pdf

mpmc1987

Shame this isn't the original version with the serial pins these make … Shame this isn't the original version with the serial pins these make great little Linux servers.


How can you tell? I bought one from dabs the last time they were on sale and it has serial pins. Is there a model number or similar to check?
These things are great, with WD green disks mine seem very quiet :-)

mpmc1987

Shame this isn't the original version with the serial pins these make … Shame this isn't the original version with the serial pins these make great little Linux servers.


How can you tell? I bought one from dabs the last time they were on sale and it has serial pins. Is there a model number or similar to check?
These things are great, with WD green disks mine seem very quiet :-)

no_Sunshine

Hmmm... good... but too expensive... too much hassle and return is … Hmmm... good... but too expensive... too much hassle and return is negligible (for a home/media server) - I'd stick with this...



Depends what you intend to do with it, and I have other uses in mind for my NAS that justify the extra cost.

I agree this deal is better value just for some extra storage for your PC. It's much better deal than you usually see with these multi-drive bay enclosures.

definition

But that lack of bandwidth is a major issue with a nas if you want to … But that lack of bandwidth is a major issue with a nas if you want to stream anything larger than an mp3 over the network. The situation is even worse with a zero as it doesn't even have an Ethernet port at all. You should know tbis means it will be complete and utter ****.The work around for the other models is quite ugly and cumbersome, difficult for most people to get their head around and adds extra cost and complexity to the device. Unfortunately you can't get away from these issues, it's better to go for something like an odroid instead bit then the cost starts to add up as it does with the Pi anyway. I'd much rather buy a device that's designed to work as a nas than buy one that's basically crippled from the outset.



I'd say it depended how many users were intending to use it, I find my Pi is surprisingly capable of delivering for low use scenarios e.g. just a couple of users watching the odd movie or listening to some music but unlikely to always be demanding large files at the same time. For more users, where time is an factor and/or more bandwidth intensive tasks then obviously you'd want more something with more bandwidth than the Pi has to offer, but each has their place. I don't think it's too difficult a task to set up either, depends on your level of expertise and experience but there's plenty of tutorials and 'how to' set up guides for anyone capable of following instructions. Point taken though, and I agree that an off the shelf product can be often easier to use for a novice - but there are always exceptions.

I did consider devices like the odroid etc. but as you say it then pushes the cost up to the point where I thought that if I was going that route then I might as well spend a little bit more and basically get a new, low powered cheap PC to do the job, something like a cheap AMD APU, a motherboard with decent audio and plenty of SATA3 ports etc. which would kick ass compared to some of the very overpriced off the shelf NAS devices I've seen, which I think are generally quite bad value for money.

This deal is good though.

definition

But that lack of bandwidth is a major issue with a nas if you want to … But that lack of bandwidth is a major issue with a nas if you want to stream anything larger than an mp3 over the network. The situation is even worse with a zero as it doesn't even have an Ethernet port at all. You should know tbis means it will be complete and utter ****.The work around for the other models is quite ugly and cumbersome, difficult for most people to get their head around and adds extra cost and complexity to the device. Unfortunately you can't get away from these issues, it's better to go for something like an odroid instead bit then the cost starts to add up as it does with the Pi anyway. I'd much rather buy a device that's designed to work as a nas than buy one that's basically crippled from the outset.



I'd say it depended how many users were intending to use it, I find my Pi is surprisingly capable of delivering for low use scenarios e.g. just a couple of users watching the odd movie or listening to some music but unlikely to always be demanding large files at the same time. For more users, where time is an factor and/or more bandwidth intensive tasks then obviously you'd want more something with more bandwidth than the Pi has to offer, but each has their place. I don't think it's too difficult a task to set up either, depends on your level of expertise and experience but there's plenty of tutorials and 'how to' set up guides for anyone capable of following instructions. Point taken though, and I agree that an off the shelf product can be often easier to use for a novice - but there are always exceptions.

I did consider devices like the odroid etc. but as you say it then pushes the cost up to the point where I thought that if I was going that route then I might as well spend a little bit more and basically get a new, low powered cheap PC to do the job, something like a cheap AMD APU, a motherboard with decent audio and plenty of SATA3 ports etc. which would kick butt compared to some of the very overpriced off the shelf NAS devices I've seen, which I think are generally quite bad value for money.

This deal is good though.

Squelch123

How can you tell? I bought one from dabs the last time they were on sale … How can you tell? I bought one from dabs the last time they were on sale and it has serial pins. Is there a model number or similar to check?These things are great, with WD green disks mine seem very quiet :-)



I only have the NSA-310 single bay, I have both the v1 version (without the silver strip over the LEDs) and the newer NSA310v2 (with the silver strip over the LEDs).

The older version has the pins the newer one's have been removed, the board is also completely different.

And from what's been said online (check nas-central forums) the NSA325's are the same. Zyxel have caught on and removed them.

Original Poster

conscience

Depends what you intend to do with it, and I have other uses in mind for … Depends what you intend to do with it, and I have other uses in mind for my NAS that justify the extra cost. I agree this deal is better value just for some extra storage for your PC. It's much better deal than you usually see with these multi-drive bay enclosures.



Extra storage for PC? Nope! For that can use an external harddrive... this is a low-cost, standalone, streaming-media-server... can share all files with all your devices on your home network and even outside of home network... is what an end user like me will want... no hassle file sharing and streaming when needed

I finally got the thing up and running and sadly I'm going to have to claim under the warranty already as it's making this constant whirring sound, it must be the fan because it happens without the hard drive in it, although is louder with a hard drive in it.

It's incredibly irritating. I can't put it into words. The noise goes straight through you. I've had it on for about an hour and it's driving me mad.
Edited by: "definition" 6th Jan 2016
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