1080p on a 27”

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Posted 23rd Nov
I have a 24” monitor which I want to change to 27”. There are several good monitor deals these days around 100 quid, but all are 1080p. I was wondering is it a good option? I don’t play games. Mostly word and excel, movies or internet browsing.
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1080p is absolutely fine for a monitor of that size.
It will be fine. However consider a 1440p monitor. It will give more columns and rows in Excel, larger viewing pane in Word etc.
The main thing to consider is what your eyesight is like. Stick with 1080p if you’d like larger text.
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deleted1471098
For work it’s fine. For gaming you need 1440p at that size and above. Personally I’d be going for 1440p as you’ll already be half way to buying one.
Edited by: "deleted1471098" 24th Nov
Oneday7724/11/2019 00:36

It will be fine. However consider a 1440p monitor. It will give more …It will be fine. However consider a 1440p monitor. It will give more columns and rows in Excel, larger viewing pane in Word etc. The main thing to consider is what your eyesight is like. Stick with 1080p if you’d like larger text.


How will a 1440p monitor that is the same size as a 1080p monitor give more columns and rows in Excel and a larger viewing pane in Word? They are the same size!
666FU24/11/2019 09:01

How will a 1440p monitor that is the same size as a 1080p monitor give …How will a 1440p monitor that is the same size as a 1080p monitor give more columns and rows in Excel and a larger viewing pane in Word? They are the same size!


In relation to how many pixels it has to resolve the screen. For instance if you set cell height to 12 pixels. A 1080p monitor will have 90 rows while 1440p 120. The cell will he physically smaller but perfectly resolved.
I honestly didn’t think I’d need to explain that.

Saying a larger viewing pane in Word is maybe a bit more ambiguous. However for any given font chosen. There will be more text displayed due to there being more pixels in any given area.
Oneday7724/11/2019 09:06

In relation to how many pixels it has to resolve the screen. For instance …In relation to how many pixels it has to resolve the screen. For instance if you set cell height to 12 pixels. A 1080p monitor will have 90 rows while 1440p 120. The cell will he physically smaller but perfectly resolved. I honestly didn’t think I’d need to explain that. Saying a larger viewing pane in Word is maybe a bit more ambiguous. However for any given font chosen. There will be more text displayed due to there being more pixels in any given area.



So the cell is "perfectly resolved" but smaller? Id rather take a larger cell, doubt my eyes will even tell the difference in how resolved it is.
666FU24/11/2019 11:14

So the cell is "perfectly resolved" but smaller? Id rather take a larger …So the cell is "perfectly resolved" but smaller? Id rather take a larger cell, doubt my eyes will even tell the difference in how resolved it is.


Which is why I mentioned in my first post about eyesight. Some will notice, others will not.
666FU24/11/2019 11:14

So the cell is "perfectly resolved" but smaller? Id rather take a larger …So the cell is "perfectly resolved" but smaller? Id rather take a larger cell, doubt my eyes will even tell the difference in how resolved it is.


Stuff is always drawn identically since they're always using exactly the same pixels. The different resolution/screen size combos change physical size rather than how detailed it is.

In exactly the same way moving the screen closer or further away does. So one of the main reason for different sizes of the same resolution to exist is to give you options to have the same physical size of stuff at different distances. A smaller screen at the same resolution will allow you to have it closer, letting you save space with a shallower desk. While a larger screen can be further away and give you more useful desk space in front of the screen.

This also means declarations of whether a resolution is good/not good for a certain size of screen are not very meaningful without including distance in the discussion.

This is assuming we're talking about FHD/1920x1080 screens. The awkward practice of applying TV-style '1080p' notation for monitors means you always have to clarify this sort of thing, since this and so many other things depend on horizontal pixels as than vertical (and the p is redundant, PCs have always been progressive scan).

A 29" 2560x1080 monitor will have smaller pixels than a 1920x1080 27" monitor, while you'd expect the opposite if you described them as 27" 1080p and 29" 1080p.
Without going into the maths. Only you can determine whether 1080 horizontal pixels or more is right for your actual usage. The extra 3" diagonal gives you some more screen space, about 25% more display area, about 1.5" - 2.0" in length or width.

This is how to determine visually as the pixels and the dimensions are of little help in practice without your personal actual usage as context,

1. Open up your Word, and Excel documents, adjust to the smallest Window pane size that you are comfortable with on your 24" existing screen.
2. Then qualitatively assess if the free spaces around these window panes with the extra gain in 3" diagonal means that you can display more parts of other documents or application screen or overlap the same screens but with a bit more separation. This is where you assess your personal gains in going from 24" to 27" diagonal.
3. The higher pixel screen (1440 horizontal) allows you to display a Windows panel much smaller (whether it is 24" or 27" screen).
splender24/11/2019 14:09

Without going into the maths. Only you can determine whether 1080 …Without going into the maths. Only you can determine whether 1080 horizontal pixels or more is right for your actual usage.


Vertical pixels.
EndlessWaves24/11/2019 14:37

Vertical pixels.


I use horizontal pixels only for illustration. I am not using vertical pixels only, you can if you want to answer in your own way. Why do you use vertical pixels?

I am using 1080 (1440) horizontal pixels as a reference. I am not using 1080p. The horizontal pixel count is a much better reference as the screen sits on a horizontal space (desk). I use horizontal dimension because the monitor is put on a desk.
Edited by: "splender" 24th Nov
EndlessWaves24/11/2019 14:37

Vertical pixels.


Question 2. Why do you write vertical pixels when I write horizontal pixels?
splender24/11/2019 14:59

Question 2. Why do you write vertical pixels when I write horizontal …Question 2. Why do you write vertical pixels when I write horizontal pixels?


Because you used 1080 and 1440 as examples, which are common vertical pixel counts.
EndlessWaves24/11/2019 16:33

Because you used 1080 and 1440 as examples, which are common vertical …Because you used 1080 and 1440 as examples, which are common vertical pixel counts.


Yes, they are indeed common ones used. You made an irrelevant assumption. You assume everyone uses the screen in landscape only. That's why you tried to be corrective due to your ignorance.

I used 1080 pixels horizontal as an illustration. I could of said, y pixels vertical or z pixels diagonal.

Paper size A4 , for Word and PDF documents and page sizes in portrait, I stand , and many office users, my screen with short sides up and down.
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deleted1471098
There’s a 32 inch 1440p aoc IPS monitor for £149.99 deal up on HUKD
Edited by: "deleted1471098" 24th Nov
deleted147109824/11/2019 19:42

There’s a 32 inch 1440p aoc IPS monitor for £149.99 deal up on HUKD


Well I think 32 inch would be too big for word and excel, and being 1440, text would be a bit small. But that’s just my opinion as I haven’t tried a 32 inch, 1440.
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deleted1471098
imransaeed25/11/2019 06:38

Well I think 32 inch would be too big for word and excel, and being 1440, …Well I think 32 inch would be too big for word and excel, and being 1440, text would be a bit small. But that’s just my opinion as I haven’t tried a 32 inch, 1440.


Windows 10 has loads of features for larger screens including increasing text size
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