24" monitor

14
Found 9th JulEdited by:"DUNOEboutTENG"
Looking for some advice
I've got this laptop
msi.com/Lap…tor

Notably it has a 1060 6GB, 7th gen i7

I'm in the market for a external monitor to connect it to when at my home desk, and decided 1080p will probably be my limit which I'm fine with.
I'll typically be playing games on it, although not so much AAA's due to hardware limitations at the moment

But is it worth me spending the extra to get something with 100Hz+?
Or just stick with 60Hz and get a good quality product?

I would like to build another desktop someday (maybe next year or something) with a bit more grunt than my laptop, so wondering if it's worth spending the extra now or would it be wasteful

(I do regret getting this laptop over building a desktop, but at the time of purchase I thought I'd be between addresses)
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A 60Hz IPS monitor should be fine unless you're an esports player. 100Hz might come in handy if you're running 50Hz emulation but its not a deal breaker.
kester7633 m ago

A 60Hz IPS monitor should be fine unless you're an esports player. 100Hz …A 60Hz IPS monitor should be fine unless you're an esports player. 100Hz might come in handy if you're running 50Hz emulation but its not a deal breaker.


Thanks for the advice, I’m not too educated on monitors but there seems to be some reasonable 1080p 60Hz screens about. What about the 21:9 monitors? They look cool but unsure what effect it could have on performance and usability

And does 60Hz mean it’d be able to display a maximum of 60fps? I mean that sounds fine to me as doubt I’d be able to notice more than that anyways
The single most worthy feature is Freesync, even though you can't use it now it's well worth getting for the future as it's smoothness improvement with no performance cost and minimal financial cost.

How much does motion quality matter to you? Your powerful graphics card will easily run less demanding games at 100fps or more so a high frame rate display is certainly an option, if you do go down that route you probably want to get one with BFI as well. 60hz does mean it can only show 60fps, a higher framerate and BFI mean smoother motion.

Performance scales almost with the number of pixels. Both horizontal and vertical resolution counts, which is why using TV notation for monitors doesn't work very well. So a 1920x1080 screen at 2.07 million pixels is around 30% more demanding than a 2560x1080 screen with 2.76 million pixels.

You have to allow for the physical extra width too, although the equivalent diagonal measurements are misleading because they're a different shape. So a 29" 2560x1080 that's the 21:9 version of a 24" 16:9 screen is a fair bit smaller than a 29" 16:9 screen would be.


What sort of price range would you be looking at? From the options you're eyeing up I'm guessing it's the sort of £150-250 mark?
EndlessWaves17 m ago

The single most worthy feature is Freesync, even though you can't use it …The single most worthy feature is Freesync, even though you can't use it now it's well worth getting for the future as it's smoothness improvement with no performance cost and minimal financial cost.How much does motion quality matter to you? Your powerful graphics card will easily run less demanding games at 100fps or more so a high frame rate display is certainly an option, if you do go down that route you probably want to get one with BFI as well. 60hz does mean it can only show 60fps, a higher framerate and BFI mean smoother motion. Performance scales almost with the number of pixels. Both horizontal and vertical resolution counts, which is why using TV notation for monitors doesn't work very well. So a 1920x1080 screen at 2.07 million pixels is around 30% more demanding than a 2560x1080 screen with 2.76 million pixels.You have to allow for the physical extra width too, although the equivalent diagonal measurements are misleading because they're a different shape. So a 29" 2560x1080 that's the 21:9 version of a 24" 16:9 screen is a fair bit smaller than a 29" 16:9 screen would be.What sort of price range would you be looking at? From the options you're eyeing up I'm guessing it's the sort of £150-250 mark?


I have always been nvidia when it comes to cards and I think Freesync only works with AMD?
It's definitely something to consider though
Apologies for the ignorance here but what is BFI?
I would like as smooth as possible. I played Skyrim on 30fps briefly the other day and it was horrible. 60fps feels so much better so can imagine it being even smoother if I go up to 75/100, however I've never played on anything above 60

Would you recommend just sticking with normal 16:9 ration then?
I mean going from a 15" laptop screen to the 24" will be a massive upgrade in itself (at work I use a 19" 4:3 dell), and thinking about desk space 21:9 monitor + the laptop will be a squeeze

Anything sub £200 is perfect, but I get that is being optimistic with my requirements. It's another reason I decided to stick to 1080p, as not only would anything higher start affecting performance, some of them 4K monitors are way above my budget

Thanks very much for the help btw, I've been out of the computer scene for a number of years now haha
Edited by: "DUNOEboutTENG" 9th Jul
BFI is black frame insertion, also known as Backlight Strobing. It works by only displaying the imagine on screen for short periods of time like CRTs did, which reduces perceived motion blur. It's mostly in the higher end monitors at the moment though, I'm not sure how far down the range it's reached.

AMD was the first to support Freesync and pushed to get it included into the DisplayPort etc. standards but it's not an AMD exclusive technology. Microsoft added support for it to the Xbox earlier this year and Intel have said they'll be supporting it. Intel also plan to launch discrete graphics cards within the next couple of years, so may well be an alternative for your next system.

Nvidia will support it eventually if it continues to rise in popularity, although they may well drag their feet and be the last to do so. Both graphics card manufacturers have been good in the past about eventually supporting whichever technology gains ascendancy.

My next screen will be an ultra-wide because I'm pretty sure it'll suit me, but the size isn't an issue for me. If you think the 29" Wide FHD model would be too big then a 24" FHD is probably your best choice.
EndlessWaves2 h, 34 m ago

BFI is black frame insertion, also known as Backlight Strobing. It works …BFI is black frame insertion, also known as Backlight Strobing. It works by only displaying the imagine on screen for short periods of time like CRTs did, which reduces perceived motion blur. It's mostly in the higher end monitors at the moment though, I'm not sure how far down the range it's reached. AMD was the first to support Freesync and pushed to get it included into the DisplayPort etc. standards but it's not an AMD exclusive technology. Microsoft added support for it to the Xbox earlier this year and Intel have said they'll be supporting it. Intel also plan to launch discrete graphics cards within the next couple of years, so may well be an alternative for your next system.Nvidia will support it eventually if it continues to rise in popularity, although they may well drag their feet and be the last to do so. Both graphics card manufacturers have been good in the past about eventually supporting whichever technology gains ascendancy.My next screen will be an ultra-wide because I'm pretty sure it'll suit me, but the size isn't an issue for me. If you think the 29" Wide FHD model would be too big then a 24" FHD is probably your best choice.



Whoa too technical, easier just to say it turns off and on the backlight to reduce persistance of vision ( which is just a fancy way of reducing ghosting on a display ). A lot like a strobe in a night club, the trick is doing it without reducing your brightness.
EndlessWaves2 h, 56 m ago

BFI is black frame insertion, also known as Backlight Strobing. It works …BFI is black frame insertion, also known as Backlight Strobing. It works by only displaying the imagine on screen for short periods of time like CRTs did, which reduces perceived motion blur. It's mostly in the higher end monitors at the moment though, I'm not sure how far down the range it's reached. AMD was the first to support Freesync and pushed to get it included into the DisplayPort etc. standards but it's not an AMD exclusive technology. Microsoft added support for it to the Xbox earlier this year and Intel have said they'll be supporting it. Intel also plan to launch discrete graphics cards within the next couple of years, so may well be an alternative for your next system.Nvidia will support it eventually if it continues to rise in popularity, although they may well drag their feet and be the last to do so. Both graphics card manufacturers have been good in the past about eventually supporting whichever technology gains ascendancy.My next screen will be an ultra-wide because I'm pretty sure it'll suit me, but the size isn't an issue for me. If you think the 29" Wide FHD model would be too big then a 24" FHD is probably your best choice.


Thanks for this
I’ll look into the BFI and see what budget they’re around

As for the freesync I was under the impression freesync was AMD’s and G-Sync was nvidias, but if freesync will be the norm might as well grab it now

Think I’ll stick with 24” FHD then, have found a couple 144Hz monitors around the £200 mark which is decent
One last question, would running a 144Hz monitor at 100Hz (if my laptop couldn’t handle the 144fps) have any downsides?

Thank you both for your inputs
DUNOEboutTENG17 h, 10 m ago

Thanks for thisI’ll look into the BFI and see what budget they’re aroundAs …Thanks for thisI’ll look into the BFI and see what budget they’re aroundAs for the freesync I was under the impression freesync was AMD’s and G-Sync was nvidias, but if freesync will be the norm might as well grab it nowThink I’ll stick with 24” FHD then, have found a couple 144Hz monitors around the £200 mark which is decentOne last question, would running a 144Hz monitor at 100Hz (if my laptop couldn’t handle the 144fps) have any downsides?Thank you both for your inputs


You're right Nvidia doesn't support Free sync unfortunately. 144Hz would depend on what you were playing, the GPU will do it fine but increasing graphical settings will hit framerates.

I would be looking at a 75Hz 24" ips monitor. Gsync on average is £100 on top of the monitor price so isn't worth it imo.
kester764 h, 14 m ago

You're right Nvidia doesn't support Free sync unfortunately. 144Hz would …You're right Nvidia doesn't support Free sync unfortunately. 144Hz would depend on what you were playing, the GPU will do it fine but increasing graphical settings will hit framerates. I would be looking at a 75Hz 24" ips monitor. Gsync on average is £100 on top of the monitor price so isn't worth it imo.


I see, suppose they'd want to push their own technology G-Sync as well rather than adopting Freesync. Maybe going 120/144Hz is optimistic on my current laptop, as I still like my games to look good (especially single player games)

Having a quick look there's no 75Hz monitors with G-Sync anyways, but there's some decent looking TN panels with Freesync as low as £110
cclonline.com/pro…57/
cclonline.com/pro…23/

Why would you recommend IPS over TN? IPS response times seem to be a bit higher at 4/5ms, the viewing angle advantage doesn't really matter to me because I'd only be at my desk using it anyway
cclonline.com/pro…29/
DUNOEboutTENG2 h, 2 m ago

I see, suppose they'd want to push their own technology G-Sync as well …I see, suppose they'd want to push their own technology G-Sync as well rather than adopting Freesync. Maybe going 120/144Hz is optimistic on my current laptop, as I still like my games to look good (especially single player games)Having a quick look there's no 75Hz monitors with G-Sync anyways, but there's some decent looking TN panels with Freesync as low as £110https://www.cclonline.com/product/249946/G2590VXQ/Monitors/AOC-G2590VXQ-25-inch-Gaming-Monitor-1000-1-1920x1080-1ms-DisplayPort-HDMI-VGA-Black-/MON4857/https://www.cclonline.com/product/248688/UM-KX1EE-002/Monitors/Acer-KG251Qbmiix-24-5-inch-Full-HD-TN-LED-Backlit-ZeroFrame-Gaming-Monitor-with-FreeSync-Speakers-VGA-and-2x-HDMI-Inputs-Black-/MON4823/Why would you recommend IPS over TN? IPS response times seem to be a bit higher at 4/5ms, the viewing angle advantage doesn't really matter to me because I'd only be at my desk using it anywayhttps://www.cclonline.com/product/254492/VG2448/Monitors/ViewSonic-VG2448-24-inch-1920-x-1080-LED-Monitor-/MON4929/



TN has a faster transission speed but lower viewing angles and worse colour space than IPS. Go for an IPS monitor with quicker GTG.
kester7614 h, 3 m ago

TN has a faster transission speed but lower viewing angles and worse …TN has a faster transission speed but lower viewing angles and worse colour space than IPS. Go for an IPS monitor with quicker GTG.


Okay thanks
Do you think this seems a good product based on spec?
overclockers.co.uk/lg-…tml
DUNOEboutTENG9 h, 12 m ago

Okay thanksDo you think this seems a good product based on …Okay thanksDo you think this seems a good product based on spec?https://www.overclockers.co.uk/lg-24mp59g-24-1920x1080-ips-1ms-75hz-freesync-widescreen-led-gaming-monitor-mo-14e-lg.html


Not sure but the specs indicate that the real refresh rate is 5ms GTG and motion blur reduction tech makes it appear as 1ms. I'd recommend reading some reviews on the monitor to see if this motion blur reduction tech is any good.
kester7613 h, 16 m ago

Not sure but the specs indicate that the real refresh rate is 5ms GTG and …Not sure but the specs indicate that the real refresh rate is 5ms GTG and motion blur reduction tech makes it appear as 1ms. I'd recommend reading some reviews on the monitor to see if this motion blur reduction tech is any good.


Oh yeah, I see that now, probably why its so cheap
I'll do some more research
Thank you
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