4K Monitor for PS4 Pro?

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Found 26th Aug 2017
I've not seen any 4K HDR monitor yet. I am getting PS4 Pro on September 6th (Destiny 2 bundle).

This is the only monitor that fits my budget;
eu.aoc.com/en/…1ug
4ms is nice as I like the competitive gaming FPS, Fighting etc.

Will I be missing out on anything major without HDR?

At the moment I have an ASUS VX239H-W monitor.
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You would probably see more of a difference from HDR than from the 4K resolution at least on a monitor, you know how small the increased amount of detail 4k offers would be on a 27 inch screen.
I personally don't think you'd be missing out on much. The win for the pro is better frame rates IMO. If your desperate I love my X34A and would recommend the Asus PG27UQ.
4Real20161 h, 30 m ago

You would probably see more of a difference from HDR than from the 4K …You would probably see more of a difference from HDR than from the 4K resolution at least on a monitor, you know how small the increased amount of detail 4k offers would be on a 27 inch screen.


More than on a TV. A 27" screen fills more of your field of vision and has pixels of a larger apparent size at typical monitor viewing distances than a 65" screen does at typical TV viewing distances.

HDR is a bundle of display technologies not just a single thing like the 4K resolution bump. The technology it's named after, High Dynamic Range, is essentially more contrast in normal LCD terms. Except that instead of making blacker blacks it goes the other way and boosts the brightness of the highlights so things like light sources and glints off metal are more realistic. Average picture brightness shouldn't change.

High Dynamic Range on an LCD requires a technology called local dimming though, which is pretty expensive to do well. TVs with a reasonable implementation start at about £1000 (at 50") and they're a few generations in. The early adopters on the monitor side could potentially be asked to shell out £1500-2000, although I don't know if any of them have actually had price tags attached yet.

Some of the supporting technologies that enable High Dynamic Range to function that such as the new gamma function (perceptual quantization) and metadata formats (HDR10, Dolby Vision) can potentially be harness to improved existing features like dynamic contrast but that's strongly implementation dependant and going by the TV world some screens will treat it as just a lurid mode. Fortunately they have been very good about providing the option to turn it off and run with the normal good picture quality.

The other technology that's getting included into the HDR push is wide colour gamut which is an ancient technology that's been available in monitors for at least 15 years. It's never gotten much traction outside of the image editing world due to poor software support though. The majority of programs just assume the standard sRGB colour space so if you connect a normal wide gamut screen the shades are wrong, typically reddish skin tones and neon green grass.

I'm guessing the HDR monitors will assume any non-HDR signal is sRGB and solve the issue that way. That has the obvious downside of not working with image editing and other programs that are colour aware though.

Both the local dimming and wide gamut elements can be supported to widely varying degrees. The marketing in the TV world has been a train wreck with no clear indication of what technologies are supported or to what degree, and very little attempt to even explain the breadth and diversity of the technology.

Unfortunately judging from the initial posts on tech sites it looks like the computer journalists won't be holding the monitor manufacturers to a higher standard.


Is it worth it? A reasonably full implementation does seem like it'll be a good improvement but we may not see such at thing at £600 for a year or two.

p.s. I'm not familiar with the 27" 4K market, but often you can grab the same monitor without the nVidia-specific G-sync for cheaper.
EndlessWaves1 h, 33 m ago

More than on a TV. A 27" screen fills more of your field of vision and has …More than on a TV. A 27" screen fills more of your field of vision and has pixels of a larger apparent size at typical monitor viewing distances than a 65" screen does at typical TV viewing distances.


If you say so, viewing distance should be adjusted accordingly for a 4K screen running 4K content.

EndlessWaves1 h, 33 m ago

HDR is a bundle of display technologies not just a single thing like the …HDR is a bundle of display technologies not just a single thing like the 4K resolution bump.


HDR has nothing to do with resolution, and I never stated otherwise.

I'm sure you post will be very informative for someone.
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