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Advice about leaving work

Avatardeleted242636618
Posted 26th Jan
So I just started this new job company A and have had two shifts already and I just got a call from another company B offering me employment. I have told them I will get back to them on that. I would definitely prefer working for company B as I get more hours and the work is easier. I want to leave Company A but I don’t know how to go about it. I feel bad because I have just started and have several pairs of uniform which will have cost them. How do I tell Company A in the correct way?
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Talk to your boss and tell him how you feel
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deleted2426366
Arto26/01/2020 17:29

Talk to your boss and tell him how you feel


That’s the bit I’m going to struggle with 🙃
deleted242636626/01/2020 17:31

That’s the bit I’m going to struggle with 🙃


Have you been wanting “job b” for a while? If so just tell your boss and say that you have wanted it for years and you have finally been given the opportunity
Be honest and up front... Its much worse for a company to get a replacement if someone just walks out as they have no staff to cover you until they find a replacement or...
Maybe they will offer you more cash, a different role unlikely but you never know as the country is close to "full employment"
Are you on any sort of probation period? Some jobs allow either party to give a weeks notice (or thereabouts) if it’s not working out during the probation period.
Just have a polite conversation. Remember that most companies won't hesitate to tell you to leave if it suits them.
email your manager to give him a heads up. say it's important you speak to him as soon as possible. you need to think about yourself. your manager will replace you eventually so don't worry about the cost. also if they bought you uniform with their own money i'm sure they are rich! maybe you can leave a £20 note on your manager's table on your last day and tell him to put it in the petty cash lol
Be honest and upfront, trying to be nice and hence not having the conversation is even worse. You would realise its a small world and you can potentially end up bumping into either Company A or your boss/colleagues from Company A at some point in your career so leaving on good amicable terms is always the best thing to do.
They will have other people
Lined up , you are not committed in any way to stay with them as you have worked there for such a short time
Honestly TBH, it's work - not telling someone their partner has died. I left a place after 2 days as I had a better offer on the table. You can be truthful but that runs the added risk of them trying to get you to stay or asking you awkward questions as to why you want to leave. I would simply go to the Manager and say that you have already worked out that this position is just not for you and it wasn't quite what you thought it would be.

As a sweetener, I told the employer that I did not need paying for the days I worked as I classed them as 'experience' days which I was very grateful for. They were absolutely fine as I knew they had others they can contact. It's better to leave sooner rather than later as it gives them an immediate chance to contact the next hopeful candidate. As for the uniform - up to you. I'm guessing you haven't worn it ALL yet so it will probably fit another employee of your size who needs some fresh kit. Other than that, offer to pay and hope they don't take you up on it!

Good luck making your move and also on your future employment. Lets hope it's a choice for the better...

Regards, Phsy.
Edited by: "Phsycronix" 26th Jan
Trust me they don't care bout your feelings, your just another number, another employee to them...you don't have to give a reason, but if you want to just say you've had a better offer and leave, .. our place have people start for a week or two then they don't bother turning up again, no phone call, letter or anything..
Secure the other job, speak to your current and explain the reasons is my opinion. Look out for yourself, yet to work for a company that actually cares...just a number. Leave respectfully and all is good.
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deleted2426366
Thanks everyone. I really appreciate all your advice.
Employment is a simple transaction, you are providing labour in exchange for payment. If at any point it doesn't suit you don't do it anymore, apart from any contractual obligations you owe them nothing. As others have said tell them straight away and be honest. Do not offer to wave any wages or pay for uniforms, that is just plain stupid.
Azwipe26/01/2020 20:02

Employment is a simple transaction, you are providing labour in exchange …Employment is a simple transaction, you are providing labour in exchange for payment. If at any point it doesn't suit you don't do it anymore, apart from any contractual obligations you owe them nothing. As others have said tell them straight away and be honest. Do not offer to wave any wages or pay for uniforms, that is just plain stupid.



Sorry Azwipe. I just felt I had to say it's not stupid - it's being courteous. I was offering my experience and showing a way you can leave on very good ground. My particular employer offered to pay me for the days but I refused as; quite simply; I didn't need the money. Also, it would be a ruthless employer who charges you for (unused) issued uniform but the gesture is usually appreciated by them nonetheless.

It saddens me a little that you think that is "stupid" but acknowledge your opinion.

Regards, Phsy.
a job is a business transaction so don't let guilt get in the way. only problem will be that if you leave so soon after joining, you won't be able to come back and work there in the future as they will black list you. but if you think job B is better for you then go to job B. you have to put your own interest first.

if it was me, i would just tell them the truth and say you got offered a job that give you more hours and the work is easier. they will understand why you are leaving. something that i always remember, 'no one is indispensable at work' and there is very little point in being loyal to a company.
Phsycronix26/01/2020 20:19

Sorry Azwipe. I just felt I had to say it's not stupid - it's being …Sorry Azwipe. I just felt I had to say it's not stupid - it's being courteous. I was offering my experience and showing a way you can leave on very good ground. My particular employer offered to pay me for the days but I refused as; quite simply; I didn't need the money. Also, it would be a ruthless employer who charges you for (unused) issued uniform but the gesture is usually appreciated by them nonetheless.It saddens me a little that you think that is "stupid" but acknowledge your opinion.Regards, Phsy.


Why does it sadden you? You are providing your labour, why should the employer not pay for it as agreed? Why should he pay for the companies uniform? It doesn't make any sense to me.
mutley126/01/2020 20:51

a job is a business transaction so don't let guilt get in the way. only …a job is a business transaction so don't let guilt get in the way. only problem will be that if you leave so soon after joining, you won't be able to come back and work there in the future as they will black list you. but if you think job B is better for you then go to job B. you have to put your own interest first.if it was me, i would just tell them the truth and say you got offered a job that give you more hours and the work is easier. they will understand why you are leaving. something that i always remember, 'no one is indispensable at work' and there is very little point in being loyal to a company.


Exactly - i wish people would see employment for what it is. You don't owe your employer anything beyond what is agreed and expected in your contract, the same goes the other way.
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