Advice on a House Style

12
Posted 27th JunEdited by:"shnp"
Hi there,

I am interested in a particular area that is made up of 70's semi-detached and detached houses. Some of the semi-detached are in, I believe, what's referred to as a 'chalet' style (like this but without the chimney).

A colleague of mine warned against this style of house, saying the design is bad and his relative had repeated issues with the roof.

I was wondering if any HUKD members live in this sort of style of house, and if so, if it's robust?

This one here is closer to this style, again the one I'm looking at has no chimney.

Many thanks for your input!
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I know of somebody who lives in this style of property and has done for 30 odd years, no major roof problems what so ever
I have viewed/been involved in lots of these style of chalet houses by various house builders all made in the 60s & 70s and no one has ever mentioned roof issues to me. There are so many built around the country if there was an issue appearing over time then there would be national news stories and investigations conducted I would suppose.

The only issue i ever came across was people saying the upstairs is baking in summer and can be freezing in winter if the insulation hasn’t been done correct.

Also, extending them and making the extension ‘fit’ the look could be more difficult.

Might be worth knocking on a few neighbours and asking if they’ve had issues. Things tend to fail around the same time if built the same time.
ArcadeAssassin27/06/2020 21:27

I have viewed/been involved in lots of these style of chalet houses by …I have viewed/been involved in lots of these style of chalet houses by various house builders all made in the 60s & 70s and no one has ever mentioned roof issues to me. There are so many built around the country if there was an issue appearing over time then there would be national news stories and investigations conducted I would suppose. The only issue i ever came across was people saying the upstairs is baking in summer and can be freezing in winter if the insulation hasn’t been done correct. Also, extending them and making the extension ‘fit’ the look could be more difficult. Might be worth knocking on a few neighbours and asking if they’ve had issues. Things tend to fail around the same time if built the same time.


Thank you - the home report mentions that the roof had condensation, but I hear this is common.
shnp27/06/2020 21:30

Thank you - the home report mentions that the roof had condensation, but I …Thank you - the home report mentions that the roof had condensation, but I hear this is common.


Yeah mine has some condensation but with insulation being what it is now and the amount you have in houses, very little heat gets to the roof to dry it all out like it used to.

You can over come this by fitting roof tile vents or roof ridge vents. Any good roofer will do this and its quite and easy job. I mean, plan to do it within a year or two if it gets bad but its not something that should stop you buying the house or worry about immediately.

Unless of course its a lake up there in which case move on lol.
Curious, have you cosidered self-build?
Rugrats27/06/2020 22:06

Curious, have you cosidered self-build?


No, I don’t have the biggest deposit - and the journey of a house build would stress me out to no end .
I thought they were called dormer bungalows.

Aside from the flat roof issues, if it is rendered/pebble dashed it will need redoing every 10-30 years if you want to keep it looking tidy (I would never touch a rendered house).
My wife wanted us to move into one of those houses but I gave it a wide berth due to the flat roof and the terrible insulation as the insulation is from 40-50 year ago so rubbish and the roofs do need checked every year if it’s not been recently done
I'm pretty sure the first house you linked to was 3 doors down from where i used to live (see picture - has a porch and cladding put on since).
I lived in one for 16 years. My thoughts are as follows.
1. I had both roofs re-felted during that time because of a leak, so did my next door neighbour.
2. The construction of the flat roof doesn't allow for (hardly) any insulation.
3. The walls around the windows are just plasterboard and tiles - again no (real) insulation.
4. Because of 2 & 3 above, the house was freezing in the winter and boiling in the winter. When I say freezing, I really can't believe how cold it was. Also when it rains its really loud. You could hear birds bouncing along the roof as well as cats walking around on it at night.
5. The guttering can't cope with the amount of water thrown at it as most of the water runs of the top roof onto the flat roof and along to the narrow strip down the side and then down into the gutter, often over running it.
6. Don't forget that the 2 end rooms (1 front and 1 back) have big chunks cut out from them and they aren't insulated either.

When I moved house, I had to buy all new duvets, as the ones I used in my old house were far too hot for a normal house. 41229798-wBsRt.jpg
My folks had a similar style house with the dormer windows in the roof, for a few years. As others have said they can be quite toasty in summer/nippy in the winter upstairs, otherwise they did have a couple of issues with the roof leaking - not the flat bit itself but around the joints to the pitched part - but nothing that couldn't be sorted relatively easily. Also look out for whatever cladding is used on the outside of the dormer, there was wooden strips on theirs which they had changed to PVC due to rotting. If the house is otherwise sound I don't think it'd put me off.
ArcadeAssassin27/06/2020 21:47

Yeah mine has some condensation but with insulation being what it is now …Yeah mine has some condensation but with insulation being what it is now and the amount you have in houses, very little heat gets to the roof to dry it all out like it used to. You can over come this by fitting roof tile vents or roof ridge vents. Any good roofer will do this and its quite and easy job. I mean, plan to do it within a year or two if it gets bad but its not something that should stop you buying the house or worry about immediately. Unless of course its a lake up there in which case move on lol.



CatsWithThumbs28/06/2020 00:03

My folks had a similar style house with the dormer windows in the roof, …My folks had a similar style house with the dormer windows in the roof, for a few years. As others have said they can be quite toasty in summer/nippy in the winter upstairs, otherwise they did have a couple of issues with the roof leaking - not the flat bit itself but around the joints to the pitched part - but nothing that couldn't be sorted relatively easily. Also look out for whatever cladding is used on the outside of the dormer, there was wooden strips on theirs which they had changed to PVC due to rotting. If the house is otherwise sound I don't think it'd put me off.



Pandamansays27/06/2020 23:50

I'm pretty sure the first house you linked to was 3 doors down from where …I'm pretty sure the first house you linked to was 3 doors down from where i used to live (see picture - has a porch and cladding put on since).I lived in one for 16 years. My thoughts are as follows.1. I had both roofs re-felted during that time because of a leak, so did my next door neighbour.2. The construction of the flat roof doesn't allow for (hardly) any insulation.3. The walls around the windows are just plasterboard and tiles - again no (real) insulation.4. Because of 2 & 3 above, the house was freezing in the winter and boiling in the winter. When I say freezing, I really can't believe how cold it was. Also when it rains its really loud. You could hear birds bouncing along the roof as well as cats walking around on it at night.5. The guttering can't cope with the amount of water thrown at it as most of the water runs of the top roof onto the flat roof and along to the narrow strip down the side and then down into the gutter, often over running it. 6. Don't forget that the 2 end rooms (1 front and 1 back) have big chunks cut out from them and they aren't insulated either.When I moved house, I had to buy all new duvets, as the ones I used in my old house were far too hot for a normal house. [Image]



Scotland131427/06/2020 22:51

My wife wanted us to move into one of those houses but I gave it a wide …My wife wanted us to move into one of those houses but I gave it a wide berth due to the flat roof and the terrible insulation as the insulation is from 40-50 year ago so rubbish and the roofs do need checked every year if it’s not been recently done



themorgatron27/06/2020 22:46

I thought they were called dormer bungalows.Aside from the flat roof …I thought they were called dormer bungalows.Aside from the flat roof issues, if it is rendered/pebble dashed it will need redoing every 10-30 years if you want to keep it looking tidy (I would never touch a rendered house).


Wow thank you to everyone who commented. The estate is made up of these chalet style semi-detached and this style which I actually prefer. I have heard good things about these houses, but they were built in the 70s too. Would one of them be a good buy?
themorgatron27/06/2020 22:46

I thought they were called dormer bungalows.Aside from the flat roof …I thought they were called dormer bungalows.Aside from the flat roof issues, if it is rendered/pebble dashed it will need redoing every 10-30 years if you want to keep it looking tidy (I would never touch a rendered house).


They are indeed. I lived in one for 15 years. Some of them in the street were not converted into the dormer style. Had recurrent problems with flat roof until we had it fibre-glassed.
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