Advice on fitting 18mm Solid Wood Flooring

      9
      Posted 2nd Dec
      I am just finishing off a kitchen extension it is just over 30m2 and I’ve got 18mm solid oak, which I’m looking to fit. My chippy is due this weekend to fit the flooring and I’m just in the process of getting materials ready for him.

      Firstly, all my research has suggested that the solid wood needs to be GLUED to my concrete floor? I have also read something about floating it on combi underlayment. Has anyone experience of the latter and is it suitable for a 30m2 area?

      Secondly, if gluing the floor is the preffered option then I’m looking at using either:

      Sikabond 54
      Lecol 5500
      Rawmar MS Polmer
      Or Bostik Laybond





      I can the Bostik Laybond cheapish £46 for 15kg the others are closer to £90+ for 15Kg. I’d imagine I will need 2-3 tubs so looking at what is going to be best in terms of cost but also drying/laying and long term. Has anyone used these glues? Are the other three worth paying more for?.

      Thanks in advance.
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      Ask your joiner?.
      ScubaDudes02/12/2019 11:57

      Ask your joiner?.


      he's a carpenter by trade, doesn't do much floor fitting to be knowledgeable about the different products. He's done all my doors, arc's and skirting and i'm happy for him to fit the flooring albeit with the materials i supply
      Recently had the flooring done in the living room and ended up going with engineered flooring.

      As such, most of my research was geared towards that type of flooring but I believe a lot of it could be applied to solid oak flooring as well.

      Personally, I would install the floor as a floating floor as solid wood flooring is more susceptible to expanding/contracting due to temperature/moisture variations.

      A floating floor with a decent expansion gap around the edges would be more forgiving of this natural movement. If you fix the floor, then this natural movement is more likely to lead to cupping leading to an un-even floor.

      Also, you make no mention of any underlay which is a must for any type of wood flooring. Don't scrimp on underlay as it will make the world of difference on how your floor feels as well as the temperature and sound absorption in the room.

      I will post a link to the underlay I used which was the cheapest I could find of this particular one.

      Also, make sure your installer has the relevant items to install the flooring (clamps, spacers etc). Where are you based as I"m selling off my installation items which may be of interest if you are local.
      I'm on my mobile and for some reason I can't post a link to the product - eBay keeps defaulting to my previous purchase of the product rather than the current listing.

      However, do a search for Wood Plus 5mm TimberTech2 underlay from Leader Stores.

      An 8m sq roll is £40 delivered.

      A few months ago it was £36 a roll so might be worth doing a Google search to see if the £40 is still the cheapest delivered price.
      does the floor have bare concrete or bitumen on it?
      bitumen was / is a basic moisture barrier.

      If bitumen will the sealing glue mix well with bitumen?
      parquet flooring was traditionally laid with / to bitumen.
      IF you have any issues with damp / or are built on heavy clay, with less than perfect drainage & water removal you may encounter swelling & lift in the future, so look, lay, address these issues as part of ongoing maintainence. of your property.

      Drainage cut into slab concrete (exterior) is pretty easy for a professional builder (metre sections with multiple mouldings for joins / adding to pre-existing drainage.

      Slab can shift / crack over time (such as adjoining your house from a laid path / slab for car parking in the 70's with weighty Suv's on it now, as well as natural degradation, if that happens & it shifts water to your brick outer & slab infill for your foundations then it will affect the slab having absorbed water one way or the other at contact points (yup even with DPM)
      plastic trays & galv steel tops in essence.
      HTH
      Edited by: "Mr_Gus" 2nd Dec
      HappyShopper02/12/2019 12:40

      Recently had the flooring done in the living room and ended up going with …Recently had the flooring done in the living room and ended up going with engineered flooring.As such, most of my research was geared towards that type of flooring but I believe a lot of it could be applied to solid oak flooring as well.Personally, I would install the floor as a floating floor as solid wood flooring is more susceptible to expanding/contracting due to temperature/moisture variations.A floating floor with a decent expansion gap around the edges would be more forgiving of this natural movement. If you fix the floor, then this natural movement is more likely to lead to cupping leading to an un-even floor.Also, you make no mention of any underlay which is a must for any type of wood flooring. Don't scrimp on underlay as it will make the world of difference on how your floor feels as well as the temperature and sound absorption in the room.I will post a link to the underlay I used which was the cheapest I could find of this particular one.Also, make sure your installer has the relevant items to install the flooring (clamps, spacers etc). Where are you based as I"m selling off my installation items which may be of interest if you are local.



      HappyShopper02/12/2019 12:53

      I'm on my mobile and for some reason I can't post a link to the product - …I'm on my mobile and for some reason I can't post a link to the product - eBay keeps defaulting to my previous purchase of the product rather than the current listing.However, do a search for Wood Plus 5mm TimberTech2 underlay from Leader Stores.An 8m sq roll is £40 delivered.A few months ago it was £36 a roll so might be worth doing a Google search to see if the £40 is still the cheapest delivered price.


      Thanks for the info.Did you fit your engineered on top of wooden floorboards or a concrete floor?

      I'm a bit concerned about using underlay and solid wood. There's more movement in solid wood than engineered so i dont want to see the floor buckling upwards after a few months. I've got two large radiators in the room as well so i'll be expanding/ contracting a fair bit i think.
      Mr_Gus02/12/2019 12:58

      does the floor have bare concrete or bitumen on it?bitumen was / is a …does the floor have bare concrete or bitumen on it?bitumen was / is a basic moisture barrier.If bitumen will the sealing glue mix well with bitumen?parquet flooring was traditionally laid with / to bitumen. IF you have any issues with damp / or are built on heavy clay, with less than perfect drainage & water removal you may encounter swelling & lift in the future, so look, lay, address these issues as part of ongoing maintainence. of your property.Drainage cut into slab concrete (exterior) is pretty easy for a professional builder (metre sections with multiple mouldings for joins / adding to pre-existing drainage.Slab can shift / crack over time (such as adjoining your house from a laid path / slab for car parking in the 70's with weighty Suv's on it now, as well as natural degradation, if that happens & it shifts water to your brick outer & slab infill for your foundations then it will affect the slab having absorbed water one way or the other at contact points (yup even with DPM)plastic trays & galv steel tops in essence.HTH


      The floor is new as in its a new extension so there's celotex and dpm. Have screed on top and have used self levelling. no bitumen or anything like that

      i have got acco drains running on the outside wall. Not finished yet but looking to slab up to level with acco's. Should hopefully deal with any excess water
      glad you laid celotex slab ..presumably the fibreglass reinforced variety?
      Think you will be fine, but likely if you wanted to take the extra precaution of finding out the bonding adhesive compatability with bitumen you might want to lay that as an extra measure.

      how "new" is the floor?
      Please check in via @ navitron forum & speak to renovation experts plus "biff" the builder
      Ash_patel123202/12/2019 13:13

      Thanks for the info.Did you fit your engineered on top of wooden …Thanks for the info.Did you fit your engineered on top of wooden floorboards or a concrete floor? I'm a bit concerned about using underlay and solid wood. There's more movement in solid wood than engineered so i dont want to see the floor buckling upwards after a few months. I've got two large radiators in the room as well so i'll be expanding/ contracting a fair bit i think.


      Both - Two thirds of the room is the original house with wooden floorboards - one third extension with concrete.

      Underlay used to even out imperfections, in and across floors, sound deadening, dpm (concrete section of room) and sound insulation as well as aiding performance/feel of flooring.

      With regards your comments about movement, they are exactly what I said earlier - you will get this movement (expanding/contracting) regardless of whether you have underlay or not - if, as you suggest, fixing the floor, where will this movement go?

      As I said earlier, a floating floor with a decent expansion gap around the edges will be more forgiving of this movement.

      Also, any flooring type, installed as fixed or floating will gain from the above mentioned benefits of underlay.

      Regardless, best of luck with whatever you decide.
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