Advice Please - Router with Gigabit Ethernet

17
Found 8th Jan
Can anyone recommend me a good value gigabit ethernet router for my ADSL internet connection?

I've got a 100 Base-T router which is fine for everything except streaming large video files from NAS, it will drop frames when streaming higher bitrate videos. A minimum of 4 ethernet ports is essential.
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17 Comments
Don't you mean a gigabit switch, routers suck at doing local network work or do you mean gigabit ethernet to WIFI.
As far as I know, a standard Bluray disk is 50mb/s, so half the data throughput 100mb/s your current router can achieve, so I don't think the bottleneck is your router.
andymagic1 h, 0 m ago

As far as I know, a standard Bluray disk is 50mb/s, so half the data …As far as I know, a standard Bluray disk is 50mb/s, so half the data throughput 100mb/s your current router can achieve, so I don't think the bottleneck is your router.


Ah, that may well be the case. I'd estimate my video files go to about 20gb maximum for a 2 hr film, and down to 700mb. The smaller files play fine but larger ones drop frames and will give spooky image until the next keyframe (or whatever you call it) so this suggested it is a bottleneck with the router.

NAS is connected via ethernet to router, both green and orange lights on the NAS ethernet socket are lit, with the green one flickering. I then either use UPnP on VLC on mac player to watch (Mac connected to router via wifi, using DHCP, the NAS has fixed IP on local network), or can mount NAD with afp (or smb or nfs) and open the files with VLC.

If the video files are on the Mac's internal drive, or an external via USB 3.0, they run fine. It's just the larger files on NAS will drop frames. I also made sure nothing else is using up Wifi bandwidth just in case that affected playing video files.

Any ideas where I should start to diagnose?
kester7619 h, 27 m ago

Don't you mean a gigabit switch, routers suck at doing local network work …Don't you mean a gigabit switch, routers suck at doing local network work or do you mean gigabit ethernet to WIFI.


I might well be thinking of a switch, sorry I'm not a great one for technical terms! See ray reply above for more info on my issue - any suggestions/corrections welcome!
Frankly the router isnt going to be the issue.

Your mac is connecting with wifi - that would be my first port of call. Try plugging in a cable and see if the problem goes away.

If you want gigabit anyway then you can pick up the netgear unmanaged switches cheaply enough if you dont need poe.
I'd just get a gigabit switch for under £10 will work fine other than the single 100mbps connection to the router/Internet but if your Internet is slower than they it should be an issue.

The only other possible slowdown would be gigs it device on a switch to a wifi device would be capped at 100mbps, again generally not an issue though.
Edited by: "dcx_badass" 9th Jan
mas9941 m ago

Frankly the router isnt going to be the issue.Your mac is connecting with …Frankly the router isnt going to be the issue.Your mac is connecting with wifi - that would be my first port of call. Try plugging in a cable and see if the problem goes away.If you want gigabit anyway then you can pick up the netgear unmanaged switches cheaply enough if you dont need poe.


Unfortunately my mac doesn't have ethernet and I don't have an adaptor, so I can't test that at the moment. Can you explain where I'd put the netgear unmanaged switch in the path? Assuming there is a chance that my existing router is the bottleneck then wouldn't there still be a bottleneck as the router's wifi is essential? Assuming the data-to-display route is NAS --> Netgear --> Router --> Wifi --> Mac (then HDMI and toslink --> Receiver --> TV and speakers). Or is there some way the Netgear switch also broadcasts via wifi??

Again, apologies if I've got the wrong idea due to my lack of understanding the processes and terminology involved.
dcx_badass29 m ago

I'd just get a gigabit switch for under £10 will work fine other than the …I'd just get a gigabit switch for under £10 will work fine other than the single 100mbps connection to the router/Internet but if your Internet is slower than they it should be an issue.The only other possible slowdown would be gigs it device on a switch to a wifi device would be capped at 100mbps, again generally not an issue though.


Sorry, I don't follow. I assume you mean a similar switch as mentioned above, can you explain where it fits in the data-to-display route, or if it replaces something in my existing route? And could you clarify what you said about capping, and is there a way I can find and disable the cap?
ElBuc57 m ago

Unfortunately my mac doesn't have ethernet and I don't have an adaptor, so …Unfortunately my mac doesn't have ethernet and I don't have an adaptor, so I can't test that at the moment. Can you explain where I'd put the netgear unmanaged switch in the path? Assuming there is a chance that my existing router is the bottleneck then wouldn't there still be a bottleneck as the router's wifi is essential? Assuming the data-to-display route is NAS --> Netgear --> Router --> Wifi --> Mac (then HDMI and toslink --> Receiver --> TV and speakers). Or is there some way the Netgear switch also broadcasts via wifi??Again, apologies if I've got the wrong idea due to my lack of understanding the processes and terminology involved.


If you dont have ethernet then...
Still most likely to be the wifi that is slowing things - wifi throughput is always going to be lower than wired connection.

Although you have just thrown in that you arent watching on the mac but using it to stream to a tv - does the tv have ethernet?

options otherwise would be usb-c -> ethernet adapter or improve the wifi. What router do you have - what wireless modes does it support? is it n or ac? ac should be easily fast enough.
ElBuc3 h, 35 m ago

Ah, that may well be the case. I'd estimate my video files go to about …Ah, that may well be the case. I'd estimate my video files go to about 20gb maximum for a 2 hr film, and down to 700mb. The smaller files play fine but larger ones drop frames and will give spooky image until the next keyframe (or whatever you call it) so this suggested it is a bottleneck with the router.NAS is connected via ethernet to router, both green and orange lights on the NAS ethernet socket are lit, with the green one flickering. I then either use UPnP on VLC on mac player to watch (Mac connected to router via wifi, using DHCP, the NAS has fixed IP on local network), or can mount NAD with afp (or smb or nfs) and open the files with VLC. If the video files are on the Mac's internal drive, or an external via USB 3.0, they run fine. It's just the larger files on NAS will drop frames. I also made sure nothing else is using up Wifi bandwidth just in case that affected playing video files.Any ideas where I should start to diagnose?



I've noticed on my setups in the past that Samba/SMB running on a NAS is never as fast as NFS when run on the same hardware, I ditched Samba a good while back due to no Windows machines....... I seems to remember getting 30 ish MB/s over Samba, but high 90's MB/s via NFS.

My current setup has the NAS in an outbuilding, connected via cheapo ethernet-over-mains boxes (temporarily) running down a 40 meter extension lead from the house (A big no-no for bandwidth) but have no problems watching large MKV's (38GB MKV watched over the weekend)

As a test I would try copying some files from the NAS to the Mac using Samba and see what sort of throughput you get, likewise, if possible set an NFS export and try connecting the Mac and repeat the tests.
It may also be worth analysing Wi-Fi and seeing if your channel selection is in use by neighbours and moving to a free channel if possible, on a Mac you can 'option' key and click on the Wi-fi menu to get more information, or run something like 'Kismac'.
mas996 h, 33 m ago

If you dont have ethernet then...Still most likely to be the wifi that is …If you dont have ethernet then...Still most likely to be the wifi that is slowing things - wifi throughput is always going to be lower than wired connection.Although you have just thrown in that you arent watching on the mac but using it to stream to a tv - does the tv have ethernet?options otherwise would be usb-c -> ethernet adapter or improve the wifi. What router do you have - what wireless modes does it support? is it n or ac? ac should be easily fast enough.


Thanks again for taking the time.

I'm not at the forefront of modern technology, my TV has no networking or USB, I use HDMI input for video only from the receiver. I like VLC as it's flexible with subtitles and audio delay to sync files that need it.

I don't have USB-c either, but I imagine there is a lightning/thunder (whatever it's called) version, so thanks, that is definitely an option especially if I can find a third party one which doesn't fleece me for adaptors like Apple do!

The router is a Technicolour TG582n from my ISP, had it for ages so an upgrade may have other advantages. It says 'Interface Type: 802.11b/g/n', I think there's a way of changing that setting if necessary, but at the moment the ISP has set permissions so it is fixed. I have a feeling this is all switched on so let me know if it is worth turning any modes off so less compatible with older devices but speeds up the wifi on newer kit - that's just a guess, not based on anything.

Or if a router with ac would do it, then any suggestions on which to go for?
andymagic6 h, 23 m ago

I've noticed on my setups in the past that Samba/SMB running on a NAS is …I've noticed on my setups in the past that Samba/SMB running on a NAS is never as fast as NFS when run on the same hardware, I ditched Samba a good while back due to no Windows machines....... I seems to remember getting 30 ish MB/s over Samba, but high 90's MB/s via NFS.My current setup has the NAS in an outbuilding, connected via cheapo ethernet-over-mains boxes (temporarily) running down a 40 meter extension lead from the house (A big no-no for bandwidth) but have no problems watching large MKV's (38GB MKV watched over the weekend)As a test I would try copying some files from the NAS to the Mac using Samba and see what sort of throughput you get, likewise, if possible set an NFS export and try connecting the Mac and repeat the tests.It may also be worth analysing Wi-Fi and seeing if your channel selection is in use by neighbours and moving to a free channel if possible, on a Mac you can 'option' key and click on the Wi-fi menu to get more information, or run something like 'Kismac'.


Good suggestions, thanks for taking the time.

Woah, didn't know the wifi option key thing. That's gonna be my new best friend! I set the wifi channel to the one with least interference a while back but most other routers are set to automatic by default, so I guess a new router in an adjacent house could upset that quite easily. I will investigate.

I'll try transferring a large file over the various protocols (or whatever you call them) to see if there's a faster one. Is it just a case of making sure there is no other traffic then dragging a fairly large file from the NAS to my mac with stopwatch running to work out the mb/s?
andymagic6 h, 31 m ago

It may also be worth analysing Wi-Fi and seeing if your channel selection …It may also be worth analysing Wi-Fi and seeing if your channel selection is in use by neighbours and moving to a free channel if possible, on a Mac you can 'option' key and click on the Wi-fi menu to get more information


Anything amiss here at first glance? Obviously you can't see other channels, but is there anything glaringly obvious like noise etc? The Tx rate says 130Mbps so that suggests it should be fast enough, in theory?
andymagic6 h, 33 m ago

on a Mac you can 'option' key and click on the Wi-fi menu to get more …on a Mac you can 'option' key and click on the Wi-fi menu to get more information,


Sorry, forgot to attach image33027991-wb2ST.jpg
andymagic7 h, 28 m ago

I've noticed on my setups in the past that Samba/SMB running on a NAS is …I've noticed on my setups in the past that Samba/SMB running on a NAS is never as fast as NFS when run on the same hardware


Just checked and currently I'm using the DLNA Media Server on the NAS (WD MyCloud) to broadcast, watching via UPnP on VLC player. Would this not be the fastest one due to it being for media, or is that not necessarily so?
I would say 130 mb/s should be plenty fast enough, if that's a consistent connection speed.

I don't have a great grasp on DLNA and how it works as I've always just shared directories and accessed files directly, but there could possibly be some transcoding going on at the NAS when it is serving up media, transcoding can eat CPU power.

The easy way to check if DLNA is the cause would be to connect the machine running VLC to the NAS so you can see the files in finder and watch the biggest file you have. If it still stutters then the problem is bandwidth, but if the problem disappears then it's the DLNA part of the setup.

The RSSI and noise numbers look pretty good to me. Copying a file and timing the transfer with a stopwatch will do the job to get MB/s
andymagic8 h, 6 m ago

Copying a file and timing the transfer with a stopwatch will do the job to …Copying a file and timing the transfer with a stopwatch will do the job to get MB/s


Thanks very much - lots to try out before shelling out
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