Am having a new boiler fitted, should I have a power flush?

25
Found 21st Jan 2015
Advice please? Should I have a power flush, or is filling with inhibitor enough?
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AskBoiler
25 Comments
I will probably get flamed here .... but in general ..... NO

but first - how old is your current system?

have you always had inhibitor in it?

do you have any kind of magnetic cleaner in the heating circuit?

what new boiler are you getting?

who is fitting new boiler

EliTom
Edited by: "elitom" 21st Jan 2015
.If the boiler is being fitted new then Id expect it to be part of the service.
All depends on how old is your system and how dirty and sludgy the water is inside the rads and if u had inhibitor in the radiators before. It always a good idea to have it done as it will prolong the life of the boiler. How much are you being charged for a power flush normally there around £250 - £300.
I would really get the water in the system checked first and if it needed doing have it done before the new boiler is fitted. Also be wary as any person you call will probably insists its done just to make money.
Also it takes around 6 - 8 hours for a decent power flush, dont let anyone do it in 2 hours then ask for full payment. The longer its connected the more it will remove.
Looking at a vallant Eco tec plus 831 to be fitted with a magnetic cleaner. This would replace our existing boiler which does not have a magnetic filter currently fitted. The boiler is as old as the house, 15 years old
hartlyhare

Looking at a vallant Eco tec plus 831 to be fitted with a magnetic … Looking at a vallant Eco tec plus 831 to be fitted with a magnetic cleaner. This would replace our existing boiler which does not have a magnetic filter currently fitted. The boiler is as old as the house, 15 years old



Ok so thsi is my take ..., and that of teh installer who fitted my boiler

15 years old is not so old. Have you always had inhibitor in the system? If yes then the following would suffice and meet the requirements of teh boilers warranty.

drain the system and fill with 2 litres Sentinel x800 jetflo.run the system for at least a few days if not a week with the jetflo. Then run the system for 2 hours at full temp and then drain teh system and flush out with several cycles of normal water. This will clear the system and will be almost as good as powerflushing but without the high cost and other associated risks of causing small leaks.

EliTom
But ... I guess it depends on what your installer has quoted / wants to do / what warranty he is offering and if such warranty depends on a powerflush

EliTom
I had my boiler replaced last year after it had been in use for 12 years. I would recommend you having it flushed the crap that came out of mine was unbelievable. I had a Worcester 38cdi with magnetic thing fitted to stop crap getting to the new boiler.
Power flush not essential (for Vaillant warranty) - chemical flush adequate if then has mag filter and inhibitor added. If they only charged £200 -£300 for a power flush I'd get that done too . British Gas quote for powerflush for my 3 bed semi £650 ! Needless to say they didnt get to fit my new boiler .
Word of caution, inhibitor won't work if you have plastic pipes without an internal barrier. It's a waste of money really unless your system is pretty much air sealed. Boiler still going strong after 25 years, had to replace pretty much every radiator in the house due to rusting.
By air sealed I mean Barrier vs Non Barrier piping and not if it's a vented system or not.
Edited by: "kester76" 21st Jan 2015
Powerflush ought to be completed prior to fitting a new boiler. My installer powerflushed mine and only charged the cost of the hire of the unit from Turner Hire (£50.00).
Get the job done properly - meaning a thorough powerflush. You can not get it done properly for under £200, and it will take a minimum of 4 hours on a tiny system, more likely a whole day. If they are at all professional they will test water quality before and after and be able to show you the results.

A properly flushed system with a boiler well fitted is much more important than the brand name on the boiler. Inhibitor is only really needed to tick the box on the benchmark (the rest of Europe doesn't seem to have this fascination with it, it's very rarely used).
[quote=ashopaholic123]I had my boiler replaced last year after it had been in use for 12 years. I would recommend you having it flushed the crap that came out of mine was unbelievable. I had a Worcester 38cdi with magnetic thing fitted to stop crap getting to the new boiler.[/
Exactly the same for ours, so much crap came out, it came as part of the boiler fitting and was, so they said ' included in the price'. If you do have it done make sure they cover your floor with thick plastic sheeting in case the machine drips. I ended up having to replace a carpet because the plumber only put down dust sheets, it cost him £300....
It also was included in the price of fitting my new boiler. It did take all day and I'm on metered water! There was no mess plumber was brilliant machine was outside used a radiator close to the back door.
new boiler will only work efficiently if you have power flush. would definitely do it.
mutley1

new boiler will only work efficiently if you have power flush. would … new boiler will only work efficiently if you have power flush. would definitely do it.



untrue

EliTom
http://www.mulgas.co.uk/the-myth-of-the-powerflush/

EliTom
If you're having a magnetic filter fitted that will stop any crap getting into your boiler. Just keep an eye on it to start with and make sure you clean it regularly to start with. I fitted my new boiler 2 years ago and didn't powerflush. Fitted a magnatech and it took months for with the heating running to get it even close to needing cleaning.

Every system is different though. Can you undo a radiator pipe and get an idea what colour the water is?
elitom

http://www.mulgas.co.uk/the-myth-of-the-powerflush/EliTom



Interesting link, thanks.
I agree with pretty much everything elitom says
elitom

http://www.mulgas.co.uk/the-myth-of-the-powerflush/EliTom



Sorry but that is rubbish. If you understand how small the waterways are in a modern boiler it becomes obvious a thorough powerflush is good practise on all but the most perfect systems - boiler heat exchangers are no longer great big lumps of cast iron. I use a powerflush on all installs, along with a Magnacleanse and radiator 'agitator', that way I can guaranteee a boiler and system that will be trouble free for a long time, and performing at its most efficient.
Plumbers often try the needs power flush to make money... It will run for years. British gas always quote extortionate prices,so think it's essential so pay up.this site is for clever thinkers without money to burn.
themorgatron

Sorry but that is rubbish. If you understand how small the waterways are … Sorry but that is rubbish. If you understand how small the waterways are in a modern boiler it becomes obvious a thorough powerflush is good practise on all but the most perfect systems - boiler heat exchangers are no longer great big lumps of cast iron. I use a powerflush on all installs, along with a Magnacleanse and radiator 'agitator', that way I can guaranteee a boiler and system that will be trouble free for a long time, and performing at its most efficient.



But then again I would never choose a boiler with small waterways ... that is a recipe for disaster!

Then again I would never choose a boiler with a divertor valve of seperste flat plate DHW heat exchanger either!

Basic mechaical engineering! Fluid mechanics and thermodynamics comd into play. When yiu understand those you can make an educated boiler choice!

EliTom
elitom

But then again I would never choose a boiler with small waterways ... … But then again I would never choose a boiler with small waterways ... that is a recipe for disaster!Then again I would never choose a boiler with a divertor valve of seperste flat plate DHW heat exchanger either!Basic mechaical engineering! Fluid mechanics and thermodynamics comd into play. When yiu understand those you can make an educated boiler choice! EliTom



I still do the same procedure when fitting an Intergas
themorgatron

I still do the same procedure when fitting an Intergas



That's what I have !

My installer looked at my old sysrem and said dont even bother with a powerflush ... absolutely no need just more risks.

And I discussed thd instsltion directly with intergas engineers when they were based in Bromsgrove and they had the same opinion .... hence mg comments here .... based on engineering background and industry views

EliTom
elitom

That's what I have !My installer looked at my old sysrem and said dont … That's what I have !My installer looked at my old sysrem and said dont even bother with a powerflush ... absolutely no need just more risks.And I discussed thd instsltion directly with intergas engineers when they were based in Bromsgrove and they had the same opinion .... hence mg comments here .... based on engineering background and industry views EliTom



To be honest Intergas/Atmos are the only boilers where a power flush can be skipped, although I still think its good practise to help safeguard trvs/rads etc. As to the risk - I think a powerflush will only ever highlight a weakpoint that was always going to leak eventually.
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