Amazon fire phone for €199 on amazon.de

Hi just came across that amazon.de (Germany) has slashed their price of Firephone to€199 (£156) from €399 (this is available for $199 (£125) in US.

But in UK its still £399 how is it fair?

17 Comments

It's the fire phone. I wouldn't worry about.

Amazon can charge whatever they want for it. A turd is still a turd, no matter what the exchange rate

doncoop

It's the fire phone. I wouldn't worry about.Amazon can charge whatever … It's the fire phone. I wouldn't worry about.Amazon can charge whatever they want for it. A turd is still a turd, no matter what the exchange rate



LOL

amazon still trying to sell these thought they had ditched it already

Different markets. Most prices are different. U can take adv of weak euro n buy from germany if u really want to.

Original Poster

espirit77

Different markets. Most prices are different. U can take adv of weak euro … Different markets. Most prices are different. U can take adv of weak euro n buy from germany if u really want to.



i cant unless i have to ask someone in Germany to collect it for me and than post it also it is locked to T-mobile.

Original Poster

espirit77

Different markets. Most prices are different. U can take adv of weak euro … Different markets. Most prices are different. U can take adv of weak euro n buy from germany if u really want to.



i think corporates think British people are loaded.

humadoon

i cant unless i have to ask someone in Germany to collect it for me and … i cant unless i have to ask someone in Germany to collect it for me and than post it also it is locked to T-mobile.



it didnt let you ship to a UK address?

just tried, it won't let me send to UK either
i can understand US items not being sent here but aren't there free trade laws that prevent something from one market being sold in another? isn't that one of the cornerstones of EU membership? I may have this wrong (I'm basing it on the cheap parallel imports of medicines from EU and what I heard regarding that law)

i am more suprised there is somone who actually want to buy this pos

DennisG

just tried, it won't let me send to UK eitheri can understand US items … just tried, it won't let me send to UK eitheri can understand US items not being sent here but aren't there free trade laws that prevent something from one market being sold in another? isn't that one of the cornerstones of EU membership? I may have this wrong (I'm basing it on the cheap parallel imports of medicines from EU and what I heard regarding that law)



i noticed this on Amazon.es the other day, when i tried to order a phone that wasn't available on amazon.co.uk, however, i was still able to order phones fro amazon.fr and amazon.it

i agree, that unless amazon has a very good reason for not sending phones, this must be flouting some free trade Eu laws. who we would report this to though, I don't know.
Edited by: "espirit77" 9th Jan 2015

technically, all Amazon's EU operations are run by a guy in a small closet in Papua New Guinea and are therefore beyond the scope of any commerce and tax law except the law of the cupboard (they choose the cupboard with the softest laws).

what really got me was the arrogance with which they complained about VAT.
at the time all their VAT was going to luxembourg which at 15% or whatever was less than the UK's 20% so allowed them to be competitive but with bigger revenue. the UK lost all that VAT revenue.
then on Kindle book sales pages, it will have the price and straight after say 'includes VAT' with a disclaimer two lines below saying Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.
they're trying to get you to get annoyed at the taxman for taking extra money from you when in reality, the rate was only 3%. obviously their political aim is to get ebooks treated same as books (0%) as they have a huge vested interest in this.
i think a law change has forced them to charge UK VAT now and ebooks will go up to std rated (20%) so they're getting their comeuppance, but I thought it was rich for a company that dodges so much tax in so many ways to kick up a fuss and imply to their customers that they're getting ripped off

Original Poster

espirit77

i noticed this on Amazon.es the other day, when i tried to order a phone … i noticed this on Amazon.es the other day, when i tried to order a phone that wasn't available on amazon.co.uk, however, i was still able to order phones fro amazon.fr and amazon.iti agree, that unless amazon has a very good reason for not sending phones, this must be flouting some free trade Eu laws. who we would report this to though, I don't know.



they only follow the laws which suit them

DennisG

technically, all Amazon's EU operations are run by a guy in a small … technically, all Amazon's EU operations are run by a guy in a small closet in Papua New Guinea and are therefore beyond the scope of any commerce and tax law except the law of the cupboard (they choose the cupboard with the softest laws).what really got me was the arrogance with which they complained about VAT.at the time all their VAT was going to luxembourg which at 15% or whatever was less than the UK's 20% so allowed them to be competitive but with bigger revenue. the UK lost all that VAT revenue.then on Kindle book sales pages, it will have the price and straight after say 'includes VAT' with a disclaimer two lines below saying Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.they're trying to get you to get annoyed at the taxman for taking extra money from you when in reality, the rate was only 3%. obviously their political aim is to get ebooks treated same as books (0%) as they have a huge vested interest in this.i think a law change has forced them to charge UK VAT now and ebooks will go up to std rated (20%) so they're getting their comeuppance, but I thought it was rich for a company that dodges so much tax in so many ways to kick up a fuss and imply to their customers that they're getting ripped off



actually no, they are subject to UK / EU laws because they operate and have operations here.

I thought it was obvious it was a joke.
Yes of course they follow UK law where they have to e.g. labour laws. It's the finance/tax laws that are most flexible and those that they most manipulate to suit them. All we need is one country to break with convention and sell their soul to high rollers and soon all corporations of a certain size will flock there for the obvious savings.

What amazon have done is shift their entire operations to Luxembourg, a nation whose 'banking secrecy laws, as well as its reputation as a tax haven, led to its being added to a "grey list" of nations with questionable banking arrangements by the G20'
This is a country that intentionally low-balls other EU member states with its exceptionally low tax rates so as to create an economy built on overseas investment that, given its tiny population, outweighs the loss of revenue from citizens.
Similarly Apple chose Ireland, exploiting a corporate tax loophole that arose because most countries require it to pay CT in the country it's HQ'd/based in, whereas Ireland only expects CT in the country in which income arose in, therefore they positioned themselves in this happy (for them) corner outside of the scope of many countries' tax laws.

anyway, the original issue was about refusing to send an item from germany to UK. there's no free trade laws between US and EU like there is intra-EU so whilst they may legitimately stop certain items being sold in overseas markets at the request of the manufacturer, I am surprised that they are able to enforce similar such bars to this particular transaction.

DennisG

I thought it was obvious it was a joke.Yes of course they follow UK law … I thought it was obvious it was a joke.Yes of course they follow UK law where they have to e.g. labour laws. It's the finance/tax laws that are most flexible and those that they most manipulate to suit them. All we need is one country to break with convention and sell their soul to high rollers and soon all corporations of a certain size will flock there for the obvious savings.What amazon have done is shift their entire operations to Luxembourg, a nation whose 'banking secrecy laws, as well as its reputation as a tax haven, led to its being added to a "grey list" of nations with questionable banking arrangements by the G20'This is a country that intentionally low-balls other EU member states with its exceptionally low tax rates so as to create an economy built on overseas investment that, given its tiny population, outweighs the loss of revenue from citizens.Similarly Apple chose Ireland, exploiting a corporate tax loophole that arose because most countries require it to pay CT in the country it's HQ'd/based in, whereas Ireland only expects CT in the country in which income arose in, therefore they positioned themselves in this happy (for them) corner outside of the scope of many countries' tax laws.anyway, the original issue was about refusing to send an item from germany to UK. there's no free trade laws between US and EU like there is intra-EU so whilst they may legitimately stop certain items being sold in overseas markets at the request of the manufacturer, I am surprised that they are able to enforce similar such bars to this particular transaction.



oh ok, i was sitting here scratching my head lol, totally agree but the one positive i can say is that they have revolutionized customer service in this country - making it more american is definitely a good thing.

Phones sell on apps, i looked at this phone and i could not get Halifax so i decided to stick with Android and Apple

Original Poster

ah its 99 quid now... interesting
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