Amps/watts

10
Posted 31st May
Hi, wonder if someone more knowledgeable than me can advise, as I’m getting confused. Just bought a 13A (3000 watt) surge protected extension, as I want to add a wifi mesh.

I’ve looked at each of the plugs currently in use, and have what appears to be the following: smart TV (5A); Hive smart box (1A); Xbox (5A); and Sky TV box (3A). On top of this, the new wifi mesh appears to be 1.5A; I also have an Nvidia Shield (can’t tell amps from the plug) and a small TP link extension (no idea). So, a total of 15.5A that I know of, without the Shield and TP link extension.

So - this is far too much, or should I be trying to convert to watts? Will all of these things be working at maximum amps if plugged in but not actually in use? (eg I’d be using either a Shield or Xbox, not simultaneously).

Advice gratefully accepted!
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10 Comments
The Amp figure on the plug is when the fuse will blow (basically after a fault)
You need the watt figure from each product. Then take this figure and divide by the voltage for the actual used Amp figure.
GAVINLEWISHUKD31/05/2020 12:40

The Amp figure on the plug is when the fuse will blow (basically after a …The Amp figure on the plug is when the fuse will blow (basically after a fault)You need the watt figure from each product. Then take this figure and divide by the voltage for the actual used Amp figure.


Thanks Gavin - so the watts and voltage should both be on each plug?
Ianaf7231/05/2020 12:42

Thanks Gavin - so the watts and voltage should both be on each plug?


No. They will either be on a sticker on each product or moulded into the plastic on others.
Look on the back of the TV it's usually on a sticker with the model and serial number.
Or if it has a separate power brick it may be on there.
Edited by: "GAVINLEWISHUKD" 31st May
GAVINLEWISHUKD31/05/2020 12:44

No. They will either be on a sticker on each product or moulded into the …No. They will either be on a sticker on each product or moulded into the plastic on others.Look on the back of the TV it's usually on a sticker with the model and serial number.


Lovely, thanks for the replies 🏻
Ianaf7231/05/2020 12:42

Thanks Gavin - so the watts and voltage should both be on each plug?


No, the watts will be on the actual devices specifications label usually attached to the rear or underside of the device.
I highly doubt all the devices you mention will have a combined power usage exceeding 3000w
Edited by: "PaulandPam" 31st May
Amperes are relative to voltage so it's easiest to work in watts as many of those devices will have external transformers (bulky plugs or boxes in the middle of cables) to change to different voltages.

But you're not even going to surpass 1000W there, let alone 3000W. A big TV on a bright HDR scene might draw 300-400W and the Xbox might be 200-250W depending on version. All the other devices only draw tens of watts, maybe single digit watts for some of them.
I had to work this out for my shed, i had pc's, monitor, switch, alexa, laptop, strip light and it all came to something daft like 5amp, you'll just have to do the math if you want piece of mind.
Thanks everyone- I’ll check each item but I’m reassured by the comments!
I think you only really need to worry if you are going to be using more than one heating item like: tongs, kettles or irons; at the same time.

You can find a handy load calculator here.
Edited by: "fablanta" 31st May
Power = Voltage x Current.

Voltage running through UK plugs is usually 230V at 50Hz frequency (but does alter to 240V (and sometimes 60Hz) before a set standardisation in 2003 to 230V, but appliances are able to operate at such a range of voltages and frequencies). European appliances have a standardisation of 220V, and variable frequency of 60Hz, but as stated above they’re fine for use in the UK.

Countries have different voltage standards, for example the USA with 120V, with appliances only operable in the UK with a converter or transformer (a charger or plug), also a good reason why phones nowadays have USB cables available to use detachable from chargers.
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